CJ 3561 Juvenile Justice

341 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
341
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
20
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

CJ 3561 Juvenile Justice

  1. 1. CJ 3561 -- Juvenile Justice Traci Welch Moritz Public Services Librarian / Assistant Professor Heterick Memorial Library Research for group presentation
  2. 2. Goals for Today 1. Remind how to prepare an annotated bibliography 2. Introduce or remind you of RefWorks and how to cite information 3. Research strategies for court cases and specific subjects
  3. 3. How are you going to remember everything you’re told?
  4. 4. • Allows you to see what is out there • Helps you narrow your topic and discard any irrelevant materials • Aids in developing the thesis • Makes you a better scholar Annotated Bibliography
  5. 5. Bibliographic Citation Software REFWORKS
  6. 6. The assignment • The first juvenile court (Chicago 1899) • The “Super Predator” myth • Kent v. United States (1966) • In re Gault (1967) • New Jersey v. T.L.O. (1985) • Roper v. Simmons (2005)
  7. 7. Background Research • Head to Google and then Google Scholar to look for information and clues. • Perfectly acceptable to use these resources at the beginning NOT as the only resources used. • Start plotting your research strategy. • Look for words and phrases to further your research. • What you find now may not be exactly what you are looking for but may lead you there.
  8. 8. Background Research • Look for names dealing with the subject or who wrote about the subject, authorities in the field or those who write a lot about it! • In additional to online resources, use – Encyclopedias – Newspapers – Biographical sources – BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS
  9. 9. Visit the library homepage
  10. 10. POLAR -- search HML and Taggert
  11. 11. Click on search OhioLINK
  12. 12. OhioLINK
  13. 13. References Sources
  14. 14. ONU ID is Library Card Off-campus access to all resources and requesting OhioLINKs will require typing in First and Last Name and all 11 digits of ONU ID.
  15. 15. Databases • Academic Search Complete • MasterFile Premier • Criminal Justice Abstracts • JSTOR • Subject specific databases
  16. 16. Primary v. Secondary Resources • What is a primary source? • The definition of a primary source varies depending upon the academic discipline and the context in which it is used. • In the humanities, a primary source could be defined as something that was created either during the time period being studied or afterward by individuals reflecting on their involvement in the events of that time.
  17. 17. LEXIS-NEXIS
  18. 18. Scholarly v. Popular Periodicals
  19. 19. Academic Search Complete/Masterfile Premier
  20. 20. Criminal Justice Abstracts At the library homepage, click on Databases - Alphabetical & Subject Listing
  21. 21. Click on criminal justice subject link
  22. 22. Click on Criminal Justice Abstracts
  23. 23. Type subject in search box Quick Search
  24. 24. Narrow by date if you choose
  25. 25. Click on the button
  26. 26. JSTOR
  27. 27. Web Resources • See Research Guide for vetted resources • Check with your professor to justify their inclusion • If okay, be sure to cite them correctly
  28. 28. Interlibrary Loan (ILL) • Use when you need a book or article that is not available online, not owned by ONU or available via OhioLINK • No charge/ limit on requests • Most requests take 5-7 days to fill • Use ILL form on library web pages.
  29. 29. Help/Instruction
  30. 30. • Ask at the Front Desk • Phone the Reference Desk – 419-772-2185 (see library page for available hours) • Contact by E-mail reference@onu.edu • t-moritz@onu.edu • Use Chat Help feature or the IM QUESTIONS?

×