Insights From the 2013 Change and Communication ROI Study

	 How the Best Deliver on	 the		
	 Employee Value Proposition		...
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Infographic: Insights from the Towers Watson 2013 Change and Communication ROI Study

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The employee value proposition defines “the give and the get” between the organization and the employee.

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Infographic: Insights from the Towers Watson 2013 Change and Communication ROI Study

  1. 1. Insights From the 2013 Change and Communication ROI Study How the Best Deliver on the Employee Value Proposition The employee value proposition (EVP) defines “the give and the get” between the organization and the employee. EVP Why does your EVP matter? Companies that deliver a differentiated aligns with the business strategy are: and 5X more likely to report their employees are highly engaged, EVP that integrates total rewards and 2X more likely to report achieving financial performance significantly above their peers. (Source: Towers Watson 2012 – 2013 Talent Management and Rewards Study) Yet only 43% of organizations report that their HR and communication team have a long-term plan in place to support the deployment of their EVP. EVPs at the best companies are: Comprehensive and balanced Combining extrinsic motivators and intrinsic factors Primarily intrinsic Primarily extrinsic 49% (including factors such as organization reputation, work environment, teamwork, etc.) (such as base pay, bonuses, health and wellness plans, etc.) of high EVP effectiveness companies are balanced. 24% of low EVP effectiveness companies are balanced. Differentiated Are significantly different and stand out from their competitors Only 18% of low EVP effectiveness companies stand out. 47% (nearly half) of high EVP effectiveness companies stand out. Business-oriented Driving employee behaviors that are most valuable to the organization 51% 59% of low EVP effectiveness companies focus on price. of high EVP effectiveness companies drive employee behavior. Employee-focused Helping employees understand how their individual 57% needs are met 44% of low EVP effectiveness companies focus on features and financial value. of high EVP effectiveness companies focus on individual needs. Organizations with high EVP effectiveness have a clearly defined EVP that is aligned with their brand and understood well enough by employees to explain to others. Organizations with low EVP effectiveness have a poorly defined EVP that is not aligned with their brand and is not well understood by employees. The EVP defines the employment deal, differentiating every aspect of an organization’s employee experience — from its mission and values, to jobs and culture, to the total rewards portfolio. It’s a promise to help employees meet their needs in exchange for their efforts each day. An effective EVP requires an aligned set of total rewards programs, a strong employer brand strategy and communication plan. Consider the following steps to improve your EVP: Develop an EVP implementation road map. Involve senior leaders early in the EVP development. Train and reward managers, and hold them accountable. Measure EVP effectiveness among different employee groups. Want to learn more? Contact your local Towers Watson consultant. towerswatson.com

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