Global Health for Multinationals: Challenges and Prescriptions for Success A OneWorld presentation by Nicole Serfontein an...
Today’s experts  Nicole has worked in New York, London and South Africa, where she was a practicing attorney in the commer...
Today’s discussion  <ul><li>Global health: The significance for global employers </li></ul><ul><li>Employee health program...
Global health continues to grow as an important topic for global employers <ul><li>Offshore workforce strategies continue ...
TW continues to research and build on our database of global health risks, costs and medical intervention programs <ul><li...
Health care trends and issues are transcending local country borders Large Global Employers Demographics Technology Diseas...
About the survey <ul><li>The survey included human resource and health and wellness executives in North America, Europe an...
Employee Health Programs:  Prevalence and Global Reach
Global reach: Operations and employee health programs Number of Countries Where Company Has Significant Business Operation...
Respondents have, on average, 25 employee health programs across their operations <ul><li>Number of  Employee Health Progr...
Most companies have medical programs and pandemic preparedness in virtually all countries of operation <ul><li>Number of C...
Respondents have robust medical programs in virtually all countries of operation <ul><li>Number of Countries Where Medical...
Wellness/health promotion programs have been implemented in some countries <ul><li>Number of Countries Where Wellness/Heal...
A majority of participants have pandemic preparedness programs in most countries Number of Countries Where Pandemic Prepar...
Program Governance towerswatson.com © 2010 Towers Watson. All rights reserved. Proprietary and Confidential. For Towers Wa...
Governance models vary: Global guidance with local decision making is most prevalent <ul><li>How Employee Health Benefits ...
Respondents keep a global watch on the following metrics <ul><li>Workforce Health-Related Metrics Monitored Around the Wor...
Issues and Strategies  towerswatson.com © 2010 Towers Watson. All rights reserved. Proprietary and Confidential. For Tower...
About one in four respondents has an employee health strategy today, with an equal number planning to develop a strategy b...
Stress, aging workforces and chronic conditions are top cost and productivity challenges  <ul><li>Impact of Health Issues ...
Health program costs are a concern for more companies than absenteeism costs <ul><li>How Costs of Employee Absenteeism and...
Implementation challenges still exist, with cost information and service gaps topping the list <ul><li>Difficulties Implem...
Most health strategies aim to address critical talent management issues but fall short of meeting objectives <ul><li>Impor...
Controlling costs, addressing health risks and incenting healthy behaviors are top priorities <ul><li>Top Priorities for E...
Ingredients for Success towerswatson.com © 2010 Towers Watson. All rights reserved. Proprietary and Confidential. For Towe...
Successful companies are more likely to have a global health strategy than less successful ones <ul><li>Documented Employe...
Measurement disciplines are likely to be a key driver of success <ul><li>Workforce Health-Related Metrics Monitored Around...
Successful companies are turning their focus to leading indicators and not responding to cost only  <ul><li>Top Priorities...
The survey’s key findings suggest that: <ul><li>It’s important to have a global strategy  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sponsorshi...
Contact details <ul><li>Francis Coleman </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address]   </li></ul></ul><ul><li>JP Provost </li></u...
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Multinational Workforce Health: Challenges and Prescriptions for Success

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In the face of pressures ranging from global economic turmoil to talent management and productivity issues, a number of multinational companies are revamping their health programs to help control long-term costs and drive performance.

The right global health strategy can strengthen talent management, boost productivity and help alleviate cost and risk pressures.

This Towers Watson presentation explores how companies are looking beyond immediate costs to address population health risks and other challenges.

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  • Changing nature of demographics - Why are ageing populations a concern? FC 1 - general rule of thumb that individuals over the age of 65 use healthcare services three to four times more than individuals younger than 65 combine this with living longer but not healthier and negative or declining birth rates the result is an insufficient working population to fund “pay as you go” healthcare systems 2 - No reserving carried out by G. So they worry about the impact of ageing populations. Want to avoid increasing taxes because of effect on a country competitiveness. The response to increase retirement age has a dual effect: not just retirement but taxes continue to subsidize health, so As retirement age is getting older – the working force will grow older. UN, currently 1 /10 individuals are over the age of 60. By 2050, this statistic is expected to decrease to 1 /5 individuals. Individuals over the age of 80 is the fastest growing segment of populations. Wider definition of healthcare to include - Emotional and mental conditions like depression and stress are on an international basis being diagnosed as clinical and treatable conditions. Consumerism. Well-entrenched concept in US, especially with the prevalence of Consumer Driven Healthcare Plans. Concept is equally recognized and applied in other countries like Singapore and South Africa. Dutch Gvt 2006 overhauled their mostly public healthcare system to a private system only. A key reason for the change was the recognition of the emerging health care consumer who is increasingly sophisticated, educated and demanding in their healthcare products and services. They want more choice and competitive prices and the Dutch government acknowledged that this need could only be met by market driven efficiencies, which supports an integrated approach to healthcare. Globalization: M arkets are opening + e’yers continue to grow and expand internationally - encourages a rise in travel among employees. Along with migration is threat of transmission of communicable diseases, like the Influenza viruses. Governance International Health Regulations: WHO in 2005 Mandate member states to develop plans that effectively respond to public health crises. To tackle this requirement effectively, Governments are likely to involve the private sector and mandate that they are equipped to deal with these types of catastrophic events. Technology Advancements: Developments in gene therapy and molecular biology are making fast progress and are likely to translate into higher healthcare costs in the near future. Obama &amp; stem cell research Another trend?: MEDICAL TOURISM – Dr Chetty specialize in healthcare operations. Objectives is to perform heart surgeries the way that Nikes in China are made – efficiently and in a high volume.
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  • How Success is Defined… NS 1. Respondents were asked to rate the importance of certain objectives for their health programs 2. Respondents were asked to rate the extent to which their programs were meeting the objectives they selected as having moderate, high or critical importance 3. Successful respondents are those who said their programs were meeting six or more of the objectives they designated as important 4. We can couch this in a way that softens the message to say the findings suggest these connections (i.e., we are not claiming cause and effect)
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  • Multinational Workforce Health: Challenges and Prescriptions for Success

    1. 1. Global Health for Multinationals: Challenges and Prescriptions for Success A OneWorld presentation by Nicole Serfontein and Francis Coleman May 26, 2010
    2. 2. Today’s experts Nicole has worked in New York, London and South Africa, where she was a practicing attorney in the commercial and financial services industry. She has consulted on health insurance and related matters for many multinational companies, government and plan trustees, and was appointed in 2003 by the Minister of Finance in South Africa to the South African Financial Services Board to draft and comment on regulations to the Financial Services Advisory Act. Nicole Serfontein is a senior international consultant for Towers Watson, based in Washington, D.C. Associate photo here Francis has more than 20 years of international benefit experience and has served in a number of different management roles and assignments worldwide, including in the U.K., France, Greece, Eastern Europe and the U.S. Francis Coleman is a director in Towers Watson’s International Consulting Group and is based in the company’s Los Angeles office.
    3. 3. Today’s discussion <ul><li>Global health: The significance for global employers </li></ul><ul><li>Employee health programs: Prevalence and global reach </li></ul><ul><li>Program governance </li></ul><ul><li>Issues and strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Ingredients for success </li></ul>
    4. 4. Global health continues to grow as an important topic for global employers <ul><li>Offshore workforce strategies continue to increase </li></ul><ul><li>Public health systems are inadequate in many countries, and high-quality health care benefits and/or services can create a competitive advantage in the war for talent </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership recognizes the value of health and that governance will provide a consistent approach to health care across geographies </li></ul><ul><li>Vendors are starting to globalize their services/products </li></ul><ul><li>Health care regulation is growing in volume and complexity around the globe, forcing large multinationals to react </li></ul>
    5. 5. TW continues to research and build on our database of global health risks, costs and medical intervention programs <ul><li>Global Medical Trends Report </li></ul><ul><li>Country surveys, e.g., Health Care Benefits in India </li></ul><ul><li>Global Health Care Cost Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Global Benefits Benchmarking Database </li></ul>
    6. 6. Health care trends and issues are transcending local country borders Large Global Employers Demographics Technology Disease Changes Globalization Consumerism Definition of Health Care Governance
    7. 7. About the survey <ul><li>The survey included human resource and health and wellness executives in North America, Europe and Asia, and was conducted online between November and December 2009 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Participation was limited to organizations with at least 500 employees and significant business operations in more than one country </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A total of 106 qualified participants completed the survey </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Titles of respondents: director of HR operations; director of global benefits; global benefits manager; global head, human resources; senior director, global compensation and benefits; senior vice president, HR; team lead, health and welfare </li></ul></ul><ul><li>All percentages are based on 106 respondents unless otherwise specified </li></ul>
    8. 8. Employee Health Programs: Prevalence and Global Reach
    9. 9. Global reach: Operations and employee health programs Number of Countries Where Company Has Significant Business Operations Number of Countries Where Employee Health Programs Are Offered Average number of countries where employee health programs are offered: 12 Average number of countries where company has significant business operations: 20 20 countries or more 5-19 countries 2-4 countries One country Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    10. 10. Respondents have, on average, 25 employee health programs across their operations <ul><li>Number of Employee Health Programs Companies Have Around the World </li></ul>Average number of employee health programs: 25 10 or fewer 11-25 26-50 51-100 More than 100 Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    11. 11. Most companies have medical programs and pandemic preparedness in virtually all countries of operation <ul><li>Number of Countries Where Employee Health Programs Are Offered in Lieu of or in Addition to Publicly Provided Programs </li></ul>Pandemic preparedness Medical/health benefits Wellness/health promotion programs Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective All/Most countries Some/Few countries No countries
    12. 12. Respondents have robust medical programs in virtually all countries of operation <ul><li>Number of Countries Where Medical/Health Benefits Are Offered </li></ul>Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective All/Most countries Some/Few countries No countries
    13. 13. Wellness/health promotion programs have been implemented in some countries <ul><li>Number of Countries Where Wellness/Health Promotion Programs Are Offered </li></ul>Vaccinations Health screening Employee assistance program (EAP) Health promotion Behavioral health Health risk assessment Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective All/Most countries Some/Few countries No countries
    14. 14. A majority of participants have pandemic preparedness programs in most countries Number of Countries Where Pandemic Preparedness Programs Are Offered Ready access to medical supplies, hospitals, clinics as required Employee alert systems, communications Evacuation processes Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective All/Most countries Some/Few countries No countries
    15. 15. Program Governance towerswatson.com © 2010 Towers Watson. All rights reserved. Proprietary and Confidential. For Towers Watson and Towers Watson client use only.
    16. 16. Governance models vary: Global guidance with local decision making is most prevalent <ul><li>How Employee Health Benefits Are Managed Within Organizations </li></ul>Completely decentralized; managed purely at the local level Other Corporate/regional guidance, but decisions made at the local level Completely centralized; all decisions made by corporate headquarters Varies by type of health program or by country Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    17. 17. Respondents keep a global watch on the following metrics <ul><li>Workforce Health-Related Metrics Monitored Around the World From Corporate/Regional Headquarters </li></ul>Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    18. 18. Issues and Strategies towerswatson.com © 2010 Towers Watson. All rights reserved. Proprietary and Confidential. For Towers Watson and Towers Watson client use only.
    19. 19. About one in four respondents has an employee health strategy today, with an equal number planning to develop a strategy by 2012 <ul><li>Organizations That Have a Documented Employee Health Strategy </li></ul>Not considering Currently have a documented global strategy Have a global strategy, but not documented Plan to have a global strategy in place by 2012 Considering developing a global strategy Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    20. 20. Stress, aging workforces and chronic conditions are top cost and productivity challenges <ul><li>Impact of Health Issues on Health Care Costs and Workforce Productivity </li></ul>Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective High impact Moderate impact Minor/No impact
    21. 21. Health program costs are a concern for more companies than absenteeism costs <ul><li>How Costs of Employee Absenteeism and Costs to Provide Employee Health Programs Compare With Those of Industry Peers/Competitors </li></ul>Costs of employee absenteeism Costs to provide employee health programs Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective Lower About the same Higher
    22. 22. Implementation challenges still exist, with cost information and service gaps topping the list <ul><li>Difficulties Implementing Employee Health Programs in Countries Where There Are Significant Business Operations </li></ul>Cost information is not available or reliable Health care products/services are not available Desired health care vendors are not present in the marketplace Available health care vendors do not have capacity Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    23. 23. Most health strategies aim to address critical talent management issues but fall short of meeting objectives <ul><li>Importance of Employee Health Strategy Objectives and the Extent to Which Health Programs Meet These Objectives </li></ul>Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective Absolutely critical/High importance Completely/Mostly met objectives
    24. 24. Controlling costs, addressing health risks and incenting healthy behaviors are top priorities <ul><li>Top Priorities for Employee Health and Wellness </li></ul>Controlling costs of employee health programs Other Addressing emerging health risks Providing incentive programs to improve employee health/wellness Improving pandemic preparedness Expanding health coverage to more/all employees Increasing quality of health care Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective
    25. 25. Ingredients for Success towerswatson.com © 2010 Towers Watson. All rights reserved. Proprietary and Confidential. For Towers Watson and Towers Watson client use only.
    26. 26. Successful companies are more likely to have a global health strategy than less successful ones <ul><li>Documented Employee Health Strategy — Successful vs. Less Successful Companies </li></ul>Currently have a documented global strategy Not considering Have a global strategy, but not documented Plan to have a global strategy in place by 2012 Considering developing a global strategy Successful companies have health benefit programs that are meeting six or more of the health strategy objectives they consider important. Less successful companies have health benefit programs that are meeting two or fewer health strategy objectives. Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective Successful companies Less successful companies
    27. 27. Measurement disciplines are likely to be a key driver of success <ul><li>Workforce Health-Related Metrics Monitored Around the World by Successful vs. Less Successful Companies </li></ul>Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective Successful companies Less successful companies
    28. 28. Successful companies are turning their focus to leading indicators and not responding to cost only <ul><li>Top Priorities for Employee Health and Wellness for Successful vs. Less Successful Companies </li></ul>Addressing emerging health risks Increasing quality of health care Controlling costs of employee health programs Providing incentive programs to improve employee health/wellness Improving pandemic preparedness Expanding health coverage to more/all employees Source: Towers Watson Workforce Health Strategies: A Multinational Perspective Successful companies Less successful companies
    29. 29. The survey’s key findings suggest that: <ul><li>It’s important to have a global strategy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sponsorship by senior leadership is critical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local adaptation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Governance approaches should include local/regional involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Health is considered holistically </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A full suite of health management programs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Measurement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not just ROI (behavior change/productivity/well-being/engagement etc.) </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Contact details <ul><li>Francis Coleman </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>JP Provost </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nicole Serfontein </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul>

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