saraba                  ISSUE 4b   THE BLACK AND WHITE ANNIVERSARY SUB-ISSUEWITH LOLA SHONEYIN: EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW & POEM...
Please print in black ink and stack together.Arranged without orderDAMILOLA AJAYI                                  3    Th...
THE SUCCESS OF A FAILURE                                                                                  DAMILOLA AJAYIN ...
excitement that we released the first issue of              Economy as our theme. Economy became ourSaraba on the eve of v...
A LOVE NOTE TO SARABA                                                                      TEMITAYO OLOFINLUAS      araba ...
shining on the African society through                  budding writers. One only needs to goliterature.                  ...
A SHORT HISTORY OF MODERN FOOLS                                                                                EMMANUEL ID...
You say we have not failed?                             Tosin Afolabi, the newer web designer, who                        ...
POEMS FOR SARABAi.DREAM MACHINEEMMANUEL IDUMAI am a dream machineDreaming bigAnd dreaming smallOr sometimesNoneThe dreamIs...
ii.SEEING DREAMSEMMANUEL IDUMAI‘ve seen dreamson colour planes –red for thatfeeling of bloodthat meansfailure,blue for gho...
VOICE IN THE WILDERNESSFor SarabaIFEH AGBONMIREThe voice in the wilderness.Calling for change.For clothing of wordsOn drie...
ON LOVE                                                             TOBI ASO, MORGAN OLUFEMI                            Fo...
SONG TO A LITERARY WOMANFEMI MORGANI love you, I love youThere‘s nothing that says it more than meThe flowers on my behalf...
ON VARIOUS   AYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKE, ÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI, JONEVE McCORMICK                                  IFEH AGBONMIRE...
Part II - Travelling in the Molue BusMake una bring out your money, Forty Forty Naira, No change o“Bus dey too hot, Everyw...
CEUX QUI DANSENT AU RYTHME DE LEUR PROPRE MUSIQUEÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCICeux qui se nourrissent de viandes…de produits laitier...
Translated:THOSE WHO DANCE TO THE RHYTHM OF THEIR OWN MUSICJONEVE McCORMICKThose who nourish themselves on meats, dairy pr...
Do not waste your timeOr put your attention here …Think of other things.Paris, le 20.06.2007Paris, 20.06.2007Traduit par b...
BLOODY SABBATHITUNU AKANDE(Even warriors sometimes loose the battle of the inner dialogue)We were sworn to an holy oath wi...
LOLA SHONEYIN           FIVE POEMSReproduced with permission of the Author                  __           INTERVIEW:       ...
CANNIBAL                                                                   COLONIESHe tells me he wants to eat me,        ...
THE CHURCH IN EYA                                              There is a church in Eya                                   ...
A FLYING METHOD POETDAMILOLA AJAYI catches up with LOLA                         Sometimes, I will spend a few days writing...
From your publications, one can almost concludethat poetry is the art form with which you are most            You have a n...
I want to believe that every body of work is borne         read such publications when most people       out of questions ...
A STREETCAR NAMED SUCCESS          EXCERPTS FROM INTRODUCTION TO “A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE”                               ...
3 BOOKS YOU’LL LOVE & WHYI DO NOT COME TO YOU BY CHANCE (By Adaobi Nwaubani)TOLU OGUNLESIA witty exploration of that      ...
ALL THE CONTRIBUTORSHere is an alphabetical list of all contributors Saraba’s had since February 2009; a homage of sorts, ...
ALL THE ISSUESALL AVAILABLE ON WWW.SARABAMAG.COMFebruary 2009: Family Issue. Guest-edited by Jumoke VerrisimoA Re-Issue pu...
THREE GOODWILLSTOBI ADEBOWALEIle-Ife, NigeriaIf there is a sentence that Saraba Magazine constantly reminds me of, its tha...
ISSUE 4 ERRATAIn our last issue, we made the underlisted mistakes. Our sincere apology to affected contributors.The use of...
PLANS FOR THE YEARMarch 2010THE (NIGER) DELTA ISSUE: Submissions for this issue have closed. This Issue wouldpublish the b...
Credits All Contributors have been previously published on Saraba, except ÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI and            JONEVE McCORM...
PUBLISHERS     Damilola Ajayi    Emmanuel Iduma  FICTION EDITOR   Arthur Anyaduba   POETRY EDITOR    Adebiyi OlusolapeNON-...
PUBLISHERS’ NOTEIt‘s a shame and a sham to lose experiments. Youcould say that this is an experiment, black and whiteand l...
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Saraba Electronic Magazine

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Saraba Electronic Magazine
ISSUE 4b
THE BLACK AND WHITE ANNIVERSARY SUB-ISSUE
WITH LOLA SHONEYIN: EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW & POEMS
PUBLISHERS :
Damilola Ajayi
Emmanuel Iduma
ÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI : Ceux qui dansent au rythme de leur propre musique

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Saraba Electronic Magazine

  1. 1. saraba ISSUE 4b THE BLACK AND WHITE ANNIVERSARY SUB-ISSUEWITH LOLA SHONEYIN: EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW & POEMS __
  2. 2. Please print in black ink and stack together.Arranged without orderDAMILOLA AJAYI 3 The Success of a FailureTEMITAYO OLOFINLUA 5 Love Notes for SarabaEMMANUEL IDUMA 7 A Short History of Modern FoolsEMMANUEL IDUMA 9 Seeing Dreams & Machine of DreamsIFEH AGBONMIRE 11 Voice in the WildernessTOBI ASO 12 Shorts and SkirtsMORGAN OLUFEMI 13 Song to a Literary WomanAYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKE 14 Molue Conductors’ ArgotÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI 16 Ceux qui dansent au rythme de leur propre musiqueJONEVE McCORMICK 17 Those who dance to the rhythm of their own musicITUNU AKANDE 19 Bloody SabbathLOLA SHONEYIN 21 Featured: Poems & InterviewTENNESSEE WILLIAMS 26 A Streetcar Named Success (Short Excerpts)OGUNLESI, UMEZ, M.CLARKE 27 Books You’ll Love & WhyALL THE CONTRIBUTORS 28ALL THE BACK ISSUES 29FROM READERS 30ISSUE 4 ERRATA 31PLANS FOR THE YEAR 32CREDITS 33PUBLISHERS’ NOTE 35 2:
  3. 3. THE SUCCESS OF A FAILURE DAMILOLA AJAYIN ow I can‘t precisely remember when I conceded to Agatha‘s impression of the Colloquium of New Writing. Perhapsit was after she made the statement, or earlier, largely on literature—Rushdie, Tolstoy, Habila. This was just one of the conversations that we would have; conversations that would occupy many Sunday afternoons subsequently.when I walked into the programme venue to findthe organizers to be fellow students, or later It was on one of those Sundays in November thatwhen a facilitator began his monologue on the Emma relayed an idea to me. Previously, we haddeath of Nigerian literature, on how our been plagued and haunted by rejection mails,gathering that fateful day in September, 2008 documents I would later find to be the reviews ofwas, in fact, a requiem of some sort, or much the early works of a great writer.later when the grand finale event was a grimshadow lacking both the enthusiasm and impact It occurred to us that the dream of starting anof the opening day. electronic magazine and floating a website through which it could be accessed wasn‘t tooBut I can precisely remember when the farfetched. But even as Emma ran through theprogramme failed in the eyes of its organizers, ideas with controlled excitement, the ideasthree individuals I would come to admire. I replicated itself in my mind in form ofknew, even from their facial expressions, that algorithmic logistics, beeping and stretching intowhat had unfurled during the program was not infinity like a grim DOS Prompt program on anexactly what they had conceptualised. Their obsolete IBM monitor.expectation was a noble one: to organize aprogram for budding writers, help them find a I knew it would not be an easy task. But I foundvoice and platform on which they could showcase the idea to be very fresh, original, timely. And Itheir talents, hence the caption of the programme welcomed it, with open mind.that lured me into being its first applicant—Write, Connect, Publish. The idea hatched, all it needed was nurture. So we assembled a team to join our duo: a poet,On the very first day of the event, the first another writer, a web-designer. We met,facilitator held up the works of the participants examined logistics, rubbed minds and at the endin the air, the weight of which should have made of the meeting, we left with a higher level ofhim wince, and said that it was all trash, hog- skepticism. Nevertheless, the idea had married uswash. Works of the organizers included. together and even when the team unceremoniously dissolved, Emma and I wereAlthough, at that point in the event, a thought stayed married to this figment. We were joinedran across my mind as to the failure of the event, in literary matrimony as Mr. and Mr. Saraba.I attended every of the three days religiously,unlike my fellow writer and friend, Agatha, not MAKING A FAMILY, A CITY,because of the toxic words that most facilitators AN ECONOMYsave one shared, but for the commune betweenwriters, the intercourse of ideas, the love for We began to prepare for our first issue. Wewhich Saraba was born of, the success of a failure. picked a theme, Family. We contacted Jumoke Verissimo to be our first guest editor. SheMR AND MR SARABA accepted. This was a boost for our morale, especially when a small portion of the SundayThe first ―toward‖ encounter with Mr. Iduma Guardian Arts Page featured our call forwas our second meeting. Our paths crossed in the submissions. Entries came in from all directions,foyer of the English Department, Obafemi from even notable writers, and it was withAwolowo University. A conversation ensued 3:
  4. 4. excitement that we released the first issue of Economy as our theme. Economy became ourSaraba on the eve of valentine, 2009. august obsession. The Economy of Sound, our first chapbook, was also in the making, a gathering ofMails of appreciation trickled in. We were added local poets. I wrote a piece on Death and Griefas links on several reputable literary magazines. which I called The Economy of Loss. And as ifCritics also brought ideas to the table; some providence foresaw our plans, there came ASUUthought what we had done was at best gibberish; strike. In that period, usually characterized byothers thought it was a humble start. Our extreme ennui for fellow students, we appliedmaiden edition earned several a name amongst ourselves. Our Sunday afternoon visits extendedwhich was ‗picture book‘. It had the flavor and into other weekdays. The dream was Saraba, theaesthetics of a campus lifestyle magazine, drive was Saraba, the future was Saraba.someone said, pictures competed with words, andmost importantly, the literary feel was OUTLOOK AND LOOKING OUTattenuated. This, we found noteworthy, and werented ourselves room for improvement. The It‘s important to note that Saraba today can‘t rubnext issue was going to be better, we thought we shoulders with greater global literary magazines.should enlarge our scope and so we chose Citylife But the figment and the economy from whichas our next theme, and opened our mails again this idea originated cannot be disregarded.for submissions. Saraba is a pioneer in online publication in Nigeria and up till date is a major labor of love.Submissions were very few and very far between, No financial support or any similar arrangementsa guest editor was not forthcoming. We were has been forthcoming but this we wouldn‘t allowsurprised and almost lost faith. But never the to deter our focus. Saraba, we once wrote, canless, again, we published. The city life issue cover regarded as human; human in the sense ofwas adorned with the picture of a black female growth. We are certain that a time would comewaving down a taxi on a commercial street, and when Saraba would stand by itself, a time not toointrospectively, this was how we felt. We were far from now, when Saraba can diversify andalone in a street with a budding idea needing become a major literary hub catering to worldlytransport to spread its fruits. The Citylife issue literary yearnings. This is achievable, I mean, wewas welcomed like a regular visitor; there was no started from scrappy ideas and here we are oneenthusiasm, especially the kind that is gleaned by year, still strong.peculiar distance. But all the same, the dreamwas alive and in the words of Emmanuel, one was Our story is an accessible fable. The moral lessontempted to end it there. is of the beauty of the mind, the possibility of ideas. Once, I was obsessed with idea of a child sitting in a small corner in his room and affectingBetween April and August, we had four months his world. Now it‘s possible. And we have theto prepare for our next issue. And ambition internet and Saraba to thank!enlarged. Our theme was grander than ourfollowing; we wanted to give Sarabaa voice of relevance, so we picked 4:
  5. 5. A LOVE NOTE TO SARABA TEMITAYO OLOFINLUAS araba you came to me, first in the month of love, February, 2009. You came as a Facebook message. Amessage across miles from a friend I‘d never Issue after issue, Saraba you open up new worlds or make me see my world in a different way. Your first ‗Family‘ Issue came as a warm hug. Family is supposed to bemet—Emmanuel Iduma. And don‘t ask me home; it‘s also that constant link betweenhow come I have a friend I have never met. the past and future. After reading, homeIt was plain curiousity that made me click took a meaning of its own—it could existthe link on a visit to that website where you anywhere, always shifting, always changing.live. That was when I submitted myself to You‘ve been home to me—one of my homes.you. I became addicted to you. And I don‘t In your Second ‗Cities‘ Issue, I enjoyedwant a cure. Four issues and two poetry reading Writers‘ Cities. It‘s astonishing howchapbooks down and I‘m literally stuck, like a city can transform fiction; sometimesan addict on hemp. Or like my six-month- acting as a mere backdrop. And at otherold nephew who cries until he feels nipples in times, its presence cannot be ignored. Onehis lips. He searches, gropes as if in the dark smells it. One sees it. One touches it. Ittill he finds it. Since that FB message, I‘ve forms the characters. It is even a character.looked forward to hearing anything from you Life in the city always seems plural but it hasSaraba—emails, magazine and newsletters. never been more singular, you said. The city is as real as you are, my love. With yourSa-ra-ba. Sah-rah-bah. Sir-Ra-Ber. I‘m not third ‗Economy‘ Issue, you raisedsure if I pronounce your name well. Or if I questions—how does the economicknow exactly what it means. I don‘t know if meltdown affect us, as individuals, as ayou‘d be male or female, if you were a nation? With this issue also came ahuman being. I have encountered you and transformation of our ‗go-betweens.‘ Yourthat‘s enough! What best words describe publishers‘ names became reduced toyou—insightful, mind-opening, a slice of initials—E.I & D.A. Well, that‘s economy ofcontemporary African literature? I‘d say you words at its best, if you ask me. Your Fourthare a sumptuous meal, well prepared, each ‗Story‘ Issue took me on a literary flight intoingredient in the right measure; every word worlds beyond the ordinary where onlywell coined, each sentence sitting well in the stories lead. What will Saraba Issues+X (Xstory. You are the dancing pot of stew filled meaning infinity here) bring? I do not knowwith many voices speaking clearly yet but I wait with a certain itch stronger thanwithout a noise. And like all good meals, you what made me keep clicking ‗next page‘ inmake me yearn for more of you. You are a previous issues.puzzle, revealing a different meaning issueafter issue. My fingers locked in yours; you Saraba, you are not afraid of experiments. Aslure me into the endless possibilities hidden a child plays with Lego, you fondle ideas (andin literature. that‘s paraphrased from your Niran Okewole interview). As a child, you have taken aSaraba, you straddle the divide between hard different step with each issue, not afraid of acore and mainstream literature (whatever fall. You do not stick with the ‗literature-as-those mean!). Maybe that‘s where your usual‘ stereotype! Not with your selection ofbeauty lies, I am not exactly sure. However, I pieces, writers, interviews or your graphicam sure of one thing; nay two—that no one design. Saraba, you have taken a life of yourcan slumber on any issue YOU raise and that own. You‘ve grown beyond a bulb of idea inyou‘ll keep readers coming back for more. the minds of two young men to a lamp 5:
  6. 6. shining on the African society through budding writers. One only needs to goliterature. through your wells of quotations and the Principles from Writers. Or read yourI hate reading PDFs but I‘ve read you, not interesting interviews with writers. Saraba,only online but there‘s your ‗namesake‘ you have kept me in the embrace of the vastfolder on my laptop—a safe haven for all world of African writers and introduced mepast issues. It‘s also on my flash drive, and to new ones. There‘s no better way to learnthat‘s so you are doubly safe! I hate to sound to write than looking through the eyes ofgushy but I love, I love, I love your layout. other writers. Oh yes, every writer shouldFree. Undefined. Creative. Beautiful. The have a unique voice but what‘s a voice if it‘slayout not only makes the pieces attractive; not heard? What‘s a voice if it does not learnit gives them an existence which lived first, in how to speak from those who have spoken?the mind of the graphic designer. Sometimes, As I gaze into your eyes, I hear voices fromyou decide to tell me the genre of what I the past beckoning me to speak. Cheeringread. At other times, there‘s silence and I me on not to fear; that I‘d be heard, that I‘dfigure whatever it is as I read. Some articles be read.come in two colours on both sides of a sheet.And it‘s not strange to find a sheet divided It was love at first sight (and read) with you,into three parts, newspaper style. You decide Saraba. It‘s February again, a year since ourto have interesting ‗callouts‘ from the piece chance encounter. This is my note to you, myor from another writer. You even use arrows love. It‘s to a blissful romance—a lastingto entice me to the next page. Your layout relationship between a magazine and aextends the boundaries that connect words to reader. Just as love hurts when it speaks thereaders. Your graphics show that what‘s truth; you may speak tough sometimes.being said is as important as the way it is Speak nicely at other times, that I want tosaid. Saraba, your graphics dare. bend and plant a warm kiss on your lips but may this love grow stronger. And lead to theIf readers call my love, Saraba, a writer‘s birth of more page-turning issues.magazine, they won‘t be wrong but that‘sone of the things you are. And ‗writer‘smagazine‘ here is not some lofty term thatmeans you feature pieces from the ‗literarygreats‘ but that you are a learning field for 6:
  7. 7. A SHORT HISTORY OF MODERN FOOLS EMMANUEL IDUMAL et me start with an explanation and a contradiction. We are not fools, and let no one call us fools. It could be that,for want of a proper title – being a lover ofgrand ones – I chose this. It should not be last few weeks, on a Sunday evening. We had met some weeks back, at a Colloquium of New Writing, one I had organized with some friends. He was most vocal. I‘ll never forget his poem. So it was easy to sign an informalinterpreted literally. In some sense, though, treaty, some pact to exchange writing souls,we are fools, and we should be called so. and become one. We did become one. InWhat I‘ll try to do is capture our foolishness foolery, at least.and non-foolishness, in equal measure, I hope.By ‗we‘ I mean Damilola Ajayi and myself, I brought out a pen, and a book. It was myand then a couple of friends worth mention. Book of Sorts, an exercise book I fill with myIn this short memoir, I want to afford myself thoughts and dreams. And we wrote. Name?the luxury of attainment, and of non- None yet. What? An electronic magazine,attainment; of the hunger and satisfaction like Writer’s Beat. Okay. Modalities? Guestthat comes with seeing dreams, perhaps, on Editor, Monthly, Website, Submissioncolour planes. guidelines, all that. Yes, yes, we nodded.To create unending voices is a foolish All foolhardy.statement. How can? A significant amount oflush voices, resplendent once, are already Foolhardy to think we could besounding patched up, and hungry. Some undergraduates and yet publishers. He‘s aboys, who meet and start an e-magazine in a medical student and I‘m a student of Law.hidden place, think they can create unending And we wanted to publish, to gather voicesvoices. How can? We all come to the moment from around the world, especially Africa.when we are foolhardy, and believe in theexistence of dreams, the actuality of those. To think we could start publishing withoutYet, meanwhile, it is an illusion, a terrible expertise and training. With only a certainnight and morningmare. Like Enya sang, inclination to writing, and zapping the―Night has brought to those who sleep only internet. It was a dead-road, an incompletedreams they cannot keep.‖ It was foolhardy to jigsaw puzzle, and we thought we couldthink we could keep this dream of creating create unending voices. Surely, there might beunending voices. the existence of something like an unending voice, or someone, but how foolish to think weThink about it some more. could create without tools, or know-how?To create unending voices is to, let‘s say, I digress.make an attraction to apparition. There isnothing like a voice that can speak forever, or We have had four issues, one sub-issue, twoat least, while humans last. Is there? Consider chapbooks, and God-knows, we try to haveit literally. There is none. online content monthly. It is this attempt that has been successful. An attempt. Success isOh God, how young and exuberant we were. nothing—what is it? But an attempt to succeed is enough success. If there have beenIt was in a small room. Complete with my moments, tied in time, that seemed to favourDad‘s books and our family computer. He us, let those be the moments we tried, failed,came to me, as had been his custom in the and tried again. 7:
  8. 8. You say we have not failed? Tosin Afolabi, the newer web designer, who gave us the present template of the site. TakesOur first issue was compared to campus his time. Always attempts to attemptChristian magazines. Pictures like a modeling perfection. Once, in a car wash, he says to me,book. That was failure. We had spent night ―I do many things.‖ And I agree.bent over our computers, and computers ofcybercafés, and we‘re called publishers of a Ayobami Omobolanle (Famurewa – I prefercampus magazine. The good gist is that he this), would become our online editor,came to my house, shouting that it was too showing hesitation at first, and thengood, that he had began to distribute all over enthusiastic support. And Biyi Olusolape,the internet. with his depth and wisdom, our new Poetry Editor, has been on this from the start.He had the plan to proliferate the internet withthe first issue. And he tried. We did not You say we have not tried to succeed?think, at that point, that we had failed. Thisfailure (let me not be misunderstood) is not a We are modern fools. Modern fools usefailure to publish, or that we received no modernity for their foolery. They are ardent,commendations. It was, permit me, a failure passionate, irrational, duty-bound, beings.in quality, and in a proper comprehension of They forget the internet is a large space, not awhat publishing literary magazines entailed. room, not a house; they treat it like their palms. And they say to themselves, ―We areThe second issue, and the third, and the making sense.‖ It‘s a lie. They made sensefourth, and this. when they became fools.We have tried to succeed, spent hours A fool thinks only about his present. Butsending mails and receiving, and designing these fools, these modern fools, think thatand uploading. We have been shunned by their present becomes, and is, their future;writers, accepted by some, and forgotten by that it does not lead necessarily to their future.some. We have made applications for A real fool, like these Saraban Fools, wouldworkshops, got accepted and rejected, and never think the future is tomorrow. It‘s today.then we have loathed some writers, together. Always today.A shared writing soul. You say I am playing on words?He is my better half. Loathes the writings I I have tried to write a short history. Yet, itloathe, love those I love. I‘ve sent mails he appears this is an exposition on foolery. Iknows nothing about and he does not object; prefer to expose our foolery. Perhaps (onlyand vice-versa. This shared writing soul is the perhaps) those who think we have a shortcore of our trial to succeed. How can one mile ahead would understand that there areattempt to succeed without a partner? kilometers that call to us. To admit our foolery from the start would be fine, andThere are other partners. Dolapo Amusan, convenient.who spent the first nights with me, uploadingand designing. Though he was amateur in In the event that we fail. In the event that weweb designing, it stopped nothing. He‘d hang our boots.remember that there were dreams deferred wehad shared, dreams from secondary school and We‘d only be thought of as modern fools whoearlier on in the university. And to see this thought the Internet was their palms.dream touch tangibility was to be grateful,and committed. He said. 8:
  9. 9. POEMS FOR SARABAi.DREAM MACHINEEMMANUEL IDUMAI am a dream machineDreaming bigAnd dreaming smallOr sometimesNoneThe dreamIs sometimes wedgedBetween frictionsHot frictionAnd cold frictionThe small machineOf dreamsWas last tunedIn 1989, has grownClumsy with misuseThe big machineOf dreamsHad been liftedAcross the hazy mazeBut too large to moveI am a machineOf dreamsLet me beLet me dream 9:
  10. 10. ii.SEEING DREAMSEMMANUEL IDUMAI‘ve seen dreamson colour planes –red for thatfeeling of bloodthat meansfailure,blue for ghostson moons sayingno at darknights,white for swanssailing ondirty diehardwaters,green for landsI cannot seebut claim –I‘ve seen dreamson bright planes,sayingyes. 10:
  11. 11. VOICE IN THE WILDERNESSFor SarabaIFEH AGBONMIREThe voice in the wilderness.Calling for change.For clothing of wordsOn dried bones.The oracle prophesiedBountiful harvestOf good writingPlenty of green leaves.Trees would be felled,Ink would bleed,On the paper-fieldsFor awing beauty.Many issues are bornFathered by varyingWordsmithsAm the womb.I am an online magazine.The literary RenaissanceBurning aglowIn the minds.The upcoming and the madeMeet on my docksWith a songThey have answered my call. 11:
  12. 12. ON LOVE TOBI ASO, MORGAN OLUFEMI For the love of Saraba and special persons. And for St. Valentine’s Day.SHORTS AND SKIRTSTOBI ASOWhen we metI wore shortsAnd you pinaforeBut did it matter?We walked and talkedWe prayed and playedYet we were teensAnd it did not matter.We shared your cakesAnd chewed my flakesWe shared all cheerfullyAnd it never did matter.We cared less about wearsBut when you switched to skirtsAnd I was still in shortsI guess wears began to mat... 12:
  13. 13. SONG TO A LITERARY WOMANFEMI MORGANI love you, I love youThere‘s nothing that says it more than meThe flowers on my behalf in whispering beThe winds wild shout, silent as it is.I love you, I love youNot the braids that makes your hair longOr the geography flashing Go che longFor all the rhythm of my veins calls your nameWhile my heart become happily inflamedI love you, I love youTHOUGH , love is fast becoming clichéI am plagued by the migraines of NietzscheWithout your play of hearts, I am nothing but a pack of mystery cardsIn this rumpled paper called life, only you can give me glads.Let not your silence kill meSmack me not with your library of booksNot the bookish, Give me the happy looksStrive to be sexy,Lie with me, don‘t be pesky.Else alone will I prefer,To chat with loneliness with my face on facebookTweeting silently on tweeterOr yawning on yahoo. 13:
  14. 14. ON VARIOUS AYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKE, ÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI, JONEVE McCORMICK IFEH AGBONMIRE & ITUNU AKANDEMOLUE CONDUCTORS’ ARGOTAYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKEPart I - Boarding the Molue BusMaroko! CMS!! Enter with your change OAbeg make una move inside, the bus never fullMadam, space still dey for inside diaAunty, make you move your yansh, dress inside properThis seat na for four people, I say make you shift for diaNa which kain wahala be this? Shebi you hear wetin the man talk?Him say na only half of im yansh fit siddon for the chair wey remainMadam, I say make you dress inside or you go pay double oWhy you dey take bad eye look me like that?No be me say make you fat full everywhere?Driver, I beg never begin to start ya moto yetPlenty people still dey try to enter the busMake una move inside o, this bus fit contain 120 peopleFifty seating, seventy standing, I say dress insideMama Ibeji comot your load from diaHaba, five people still go fit for inside this busSisi, see how you sit come open your legs like AshewoI dey sure say if you close your legs,That man wey thin like stockfish fit manage siddon for ya sideOga, she don dress small, oya siddon make another person stand for that placeCMS! Maroko!! CMS!!! The bus don almost fullI no get change o, enter with your correct moneyNa wah for you madam, you know say you get belleNa im you carry these two pikins plus this heavy loadThe load no fit enter for dia, you go pay Fifty Naira for that load oNa wetin you talk for my back? Na your Papa you dey curse, no be me, you hear?Una see me see wahala? Abi na me give you belle?If you no wan enter, carry your bad luck comot, no come spoil my market todayOga Driver, bus don full, abeg fire your motor, make we comot from here[Banging on the side of the bus] Go on sọun, Maroko! CMS!! CMS!!! Straighttttttttttt. 14:
  15. 15. Part II - Travelling in the Molue BusMake una bring out your money, Forty Forty Naira, No change o“Bus dey too hot, Everywhere dey too tight” - Why you dey complain?If you sabi say you get car, why you come dey enter Molue, foolish womanAunty, you go pay for that pikin wey you carry put for leg o, no free travel for hereMister man, I said no change, I have to marry you with that womanMadam, I don give this Oga Twenty Naira, He go give you your Ten Naira changeOga Pastor, comot make I pass, Na so you go take preaching kill us todayHoly Ghost fire this, Jesus is coming that, You for pray make this our country betaNa so you people just carry church full everywhere, abi na Naija people kill Jesus?Mister Teacher shift go back small, this fine Sisi don start to complainShe say you dey chook im backyard with your magic pole, Shame no dey catch you?Small time you go tell people say you dey show good example to ya studentOga Dokita, how much be that medicine? You sure say e fit cure my jedijedi?Na so you talk the last time about that medicine wey suppose cure my malariaNo take your papa head swear say na beta medicine, if this medicine no work,I go collect my money from your hand next time I see you or else you go hear weeenYou this boy wey dey hang for back door, where your money, you think I no see you?Your money remain Ten Naira, Pay me my money before I show you pepper!Oga Driver CMS o wa o, abeg driver slow ya moto make people comot from hereDriver! I say make you slow down, the woman get belle plus load and pikin oMama make you hurry up, abi you want make Yellow Fever catch us for here?Sisi, abeg jump comot for road jo, you no see say plenty people wan comot for here? Person wey see as you closeleg waka no go gree say na you open leg siddon beforeOga come carry your load if you no wan make driver drive comot with amMaroko! Maroko straight, enter with your Twenty Naira, I no get change oOya driver move ya moto, no let that molue overtake you oGo on sọun! Make una see this foolish woman oYou no go carry your K-leg comot for road before motor jam u?Abeg driver make im pass, e be like say this one don sign say na today e go dieCarry go! Make we reach Maroko so I fit go chop eba and bokoto for Iya Sikira Buka. 15:
  16. 16. CEUX QUI DANSENT AU RYTHME DE LEUR PROPRE MUSIQUEÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCICeux qui se nourrissent de viandes…de produits laitiers…de dessertsNe peuvent testimer à ta juste valeur.Même si la pierre se fendait, tu ne peux pas leur faire ouvrirLes fenêtres de leur ferme…Des gens comme toi ne font pas partie de leur centre dintérêtTu nexistes pas…Dorénavant tu dois savoirQuils nont pas de temps à te consacrer!Ils ont les yeux fixés toujours vers le hautPendant quils sinclinentAvec un sourire au dessus de leur double mentonDevant le souverain… le sultanCrois-tu un seul instant quils te reconnaissent?Si tu me demandes mon avis à ce sujetCest que les bouts de leur ficelleSont aux mains dautruiNe te formalise point du faitQuils se prennent pour des rois!Avec des espoirs vainsEt des attentes mal placéesNattends pas deuxQuils te considèrent comme un homme…Même si tu écris des centaines de lettresAux hommes des portes ferméesDans le but de les voir ou de leur parlerTu ne recevras même pas une seule réponse…Méfie-toi, sois attentifPar-dessus toutTu leur permettras davoir des airs hautainsEn se croyant importantsIls te regarderont avec dédain!Ils aiment bien se caresserLe dos les uns des autres…Il ne reste plusQuà écouter leurs conversations ―avec admiration‖A vanter leurs écrits ―exagérément‖A récompenser leurs faits ―par applaudissement‖…Ne perds pas de tempsEt ne toccupe pasEn pensant à autres choses. 16:
  17. 17. Translated:THOSE WHO DANCE TO THE RHYTHM OF THEIR OWN MUSICJONEVE McCORMICKThose who nourish themselves on meats, dairy products and dessertsCannot estimate you at your fair value.Even if stone cracked, you cannot make them openThe windows of their farm …People like you are not included in their center of interestYou do not exist …Hereafter you must knowThat they do not have time to bless you!Their eyes are always fixed from above youWhile they bowWith smiles above their double chinsBefore the sovereign...the sultan.Do you think for an instant that they acknowledge you?If you ask my opinion on this subjectIt is because the ends of their twineAre in the hands of other people.Dont take exception to the factThat they are taken for kings!Do not wait for themIn the wrong placesVainly hopingThey will consider you a man …Even if you write hundreds of lettersTo these men of the closed doorsIntending to see or speak to themYou will not receive a single response …Be wary and attentive;Above everythingAllow them their haughty airs.By thinking themselves importantThey will look at you scornfully!They well like fondlingEach others backs …It is no longer to the pointTo listen to their dialogues ―with admiration‖To extol their writings ―enthusiastically‖To reward their facts ―by clapping‖… 17:
  18. 18. Do not waste your timeOr put your attention here …Think of other things.Paris, le 20.06.2007Paris, 20.06.2007Traduit par by Yakup YURT en françaisFrench free verse translated into English free verseby Joneve McCormick 18:
  19. 19. BLOODY SABBATHITUNU AKANDE(Even warriors sometimes loose the battle of the inner dialogue)We were sworn to an holy oath with no known limitUnwritten, though, we loved it so muchFor it left us with bars to break in the game of strengthWhere men are weaned with the milk of warLari kori sarabaStrange voices from the earthThat bore the mass of our stamping feetOurs was a fierce race with the goodwill of SangoThe god of lightning and thunderNay!It wasn‘t that our heart never knew what it meant to loveIt was for love that we fought for you- Oh OyaFor your love we bore so much hurtOya!Frenzied in your soprano toneI can tell the lost story of our historyBut they mocked your flaming beautyAnd spoke of you in some strange tonguesMen from that side of the sea that paints your ass as blackAnd a wig as whiteHeal us with your kiss dear motherTons of blood oozes from our sidesWith chants of war brewing for your causeOur arms shall know no rest till Sabbath is drenched with bloodWithout fail each daySparing touch to life and chanceWe shall stand for the love of our landFor the sake of our raceKeeping faith with the count of time…and these things shall passbut one thing shall beruins and songs of war. 19:
  20. 20. LOLA SHONEYIN FIVE POEMSReproduced with permission of the Author __ INTERVIEW: A Flying Method Poet __ BOOK: For the Love of Flight Published by Cassava Republic Press All Rights Reserved © Lola Shoneyin 2010 ISBN 978 978- 906-089-4 20:
  21. 21. CANNIBAL COLONIESHe tells me he wants to eat me, Not too long ago,tear at my tendons, gnaw at my flesh the British kneadedpart muscle, lap up blood, Africa like doughnibble at the hardened tips, then cut itdribble over the softened bits, into misshapenswallow me hole gingerbread men.by hole and pick his teethwith my small, succulent bones. The French rolled it, long like a baguette,Look, I tell him, then sank itI‘m not a seasoned chicken breast into steaming broth.or mutton minced to munch onAnd anyway, you know The Portuguese forked it,I‘m having someone else for luncheon. the Belgians knifed it.He doesn‘t care. And now the Chinese are here,He parts his lips and licks them chopsticks in towagain and again and again. chins in their bowls to swallow it whole like a sweet, sour ball. NEXT TIME ROUND The next time round, I won‘t be cut down, knocked up, circled with silver or sat on. Instead, I will spread my branches in a slow dawn yawn and lick the dew from every morning. 21:
  22. 22. THE CHURCH IN EYA There is a church in Eya where there‘s no Jesus to burn a hole through your heart, or your pocket. No Jesus to stare you up the aisle, tut-tutting, shaking his head when no one is looking.OPEN No one, that is, but you.She is a vagrant poem,a cautionary tale, No portrait of pain on the wall,an old story, meekly pleadingan open book. eyes rolled up to the birds thrashing aboutHer belly opens the ceiling.and pages fly from it.Words fall to feet, No Jesus to remind youletters flood floor, what a piece of shit you arequestions mark steps. for unbuttoning your blouse or unfastening your zipLike Sylvia, she straddles, or cursing those who weaken you.and stumbles.Who will put her back In the church in Eya,together again? the pillars are cleanWho will bind her and the walls are white.and bring her to a close? And on the immaculate walls, there are mirrors. Nothing fancy, just mirrors. And after singing and dancing with your reflection, you pray. You kneel quietly at a pew, and look at yourself and you search yourself. 22:
  23. 23. A FLYING METHOD POETDAMILOLA AJAYI catches up with LOLA Sometimes, I will spend a few days writing aSHONEYIN, an established Nigerian poet whose poem. I write a little, leave it, return to it,new collection For the Love of Flight was recently only to find that I‘d been subconsciouslypublished by Cassava Republic Press. expressing my thoughts about something I didn‘t even know was bothering me. ThereBeing a mother of four and a wife with a full-time has been a significant movement as far as the job, how do you find time to write at all? themes I am preoccupied with go.My children are a wonderful distraction, butthey have come to understand that when How has living outside Nigeria affected yourMum has to write, she has to write. They are writing? How would you compare the world ofvery forgiving and I hope they know how publishing and your reading audience?much I appreciate their patience. Luckily for The most important thing living outsidethem, my husband, Olaokun, is a fantastic Nigeria has done for me is to teach me thefather. They prefer to hang out with him value of pursuing high standards. In Nigeria,anyways, because he‘s so creative, so random. most publishers seem to print without anyHe buys them clay, he paints with them, and editorial contributions, which is a shamecooks with them. This works well for me because authors are missing out on valuablebecause it gives me time to write. Like most input at the different stages of writing. As awriters, I prefer to write at night-time. I give result, the end product is unsatisfactory, and,myself deadlines and work towards them. in a sense, unsatisfying for the author too.That‘s all the self-discipline I can handle. In the UK, there is lot of heartache that What books are you reading presently? comes with the publishing world; the desireI am reading African Psycho by Alain to be known as an author is not withoutMabanckou. He‘s a Francophone writer, and pain-- from getting an agent, to improvingI keep telling everyone about him. His novel, your manuscript, to finding a publisher. InBroken Glass, was one of the funniest I‘ve ever the end, one cannot but feel a great sense ofread in my life. I‘ve lent the novel to a few achievement, and of course relief, havingpeople and we all have private jokes now, been through the rigour of writing andjokes relating to incidents in the novel. rewriting. I am however pleased that all myThat‘s the mark of excellent writing–– writing has been published in Nigeria first.something has got to stay with you. I now go Nigerians are my primary audience.out of my way to look for Francophonewriting in translation because it‘s so much Your first collection is titled So All This Time Imore exciting. We are much too inhibited in Was Sitting on an Egg, the second, Song of aAnglophone Africa. Riverbird, and now the third is called For the Love of Flight. In a recent interview, you talked about how you What is your obsession with birds? started writing poetry by composing naughty Yes, I do have a thing for birds. If I had to limericks in boarding school. Those funny return to this horrible world, at least let me beginnings have morphed into your poetry today. come back as a bird, preferably an owl. I love Can you comment on this transition? owls. When I look up at the sky and seePeople would feel sorry for me if I was still birds, I always feel a tinge of jealousy. Thewriting those limericks (actually I still do), idea of freedom is very important to me, ifbut I think it‘s all down to growth— not in speech, then at least in thought. Birdsemotional growth and an increased enjoy freedom in the way humans can‘t. Iawareness of the world one lives in. Writing wish I were a bird; I try to live my life as freeis also therapeutic for me and I learn a lot as one.about myself through my own writing. 23:
  24. 24. From your publications, one can almost concludethat poetry is the art form with which you are most You have a novel, The Secret Lives of Baba at ease. Do you see yourself primarily as a poet? Segi Wives, coming out soon. Can you educate usWell, you‘ll have to read my novel first to see on the challenges of juggling between art forms,if you still feel this way. Without a doubt, I because I am well aware that there is a differenceenjoy the extra challenge of having to be between doing fiction and poetry?economical with words that poetry poses. The only difference for me is that fictionWhen I‘m writing a poem, my mind works captures the other extreme in my character –differently, it‘s an involved, deeply personal – the chatty, gregarious, humorous side. It isprocess. I should add that don‘t find writing very difficult for me to flit between the twopoetry as easy as it was when my first forms. I find I can write prose on demand,collection came out twelve years ago. My force myself into the required frame of mind.focus now is on how I express a thought With poetry, I have to be inspired.rather than just the thought itself. Havingsaid this, I love writing fiction. It‘s like You are a Fellow of The Iowa Internationalworking with a massive canvas. Writing Program, what we refer to in Saraba as the “Mecca of writers”, how did the creative So all this time I was sitting on an egg, your writing programme influenced your writing? first collection, was largely autobiographical. In I had good fun. I put on about a stone For the Love of Flight, the clarity and evocation because there was so much amazing food of poems such as "For Kiitan" leave no doubt in a there. I met some great writers and I am still reader’s mind that you were writing about your in touch with some of them. I was the onlylife. My question is: how much of your personal life African there that year so it was quite special. would you be willing to reveal as the price for It‘s not an experience you can ever forget. literary ingenuity?I‘m glad you used the word ‗largely‘ because What are your impressions about the NigerianI like to step into other people‘s shoes and literary scene, the rise of some publishing houses tobecome them, be a method poet, if you like. fill the vacuum created in the military era,For this reason, I love the writing in the first noteworthy among which are Cassava Republic,person narrative voice. It works well for me Farafina and Dada books etc.but don‘t be fooled into thinking the poet Cassava Republic Press is publishing mypersona is always me, Lola. This is not the novel and I feel very lucky. They approachedcase. me and asked to see my manuscript. They read it, we met and the rest is history. BibiConversely, because of the introspective Bakare-Yusuf, my editor, is an amazingprocess that I go through when I am writing editor. Apart from the energy that shepoetry, it is difficult not to reveal things exudes, she is also intuitive and very smart.which are personal to me. My feeling is that We work very well together. She is not onlywriting about my process of healing, interested in profit, she is interested in booksawakening, or redemption will help people in themselves, and more importantly, thesimilar situations. Sometimes, when you are writers of the books. Farafina publishesgoing through something painful or Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Sefi Atta. Iinconvenient, there is comfort in knowing hear they are also going to publish Maikthat someone else has seen what your eyes Nwosu. This is wonderful news as it showsare seeing. Yes, some of my poems are that they are focusing on giving the newpersonal and this irks my husband who is a generation of writers the exposure theyvery private person. He was telling me a few deserve.days ago that he‘d decided to live with mywork because the alternative was to stifle mycreativity, something he wouldn‘t dream ofdoing. I am a very lucky woman. 24:
  25. 25. I want to believe that every body of work is borne read such publications when most people out of questions and the need to answer these can‘t read at all, or would rather readquestions or be it as it may, ask new ones? What tabloids. This is what our rulers have done to were the questions that inspired your upcoming us; it will be decades before we can regain all collection, For the Love of Flight? the lost ground.What is the significance of love and how is itmanifested in our lives? What is the place of There is a section in your new collection thatreligion in our every day existence? Why are examines known government officials. What do youNigerian rulers bent on eroding the integrity really think of the current leadership in Nigeria?of the entire population? A sham! A disgrace! A farce! A bunch of ignoramuses who have lost all sense of what Has your style of poetry been influenced by an it means to serve their country! They are earlier poet(s) and if yes, who and how? there to serve themselves and their families,When I first started writing, I loved reading at all costs. There must be consequences forMaya Angelou, Mabel Segun, Alice Walker this kind of behaviour.and Ntosage Shange. Maya Angelou, Ibelieve, writes popular, accessible poetry. I Do you see yourself becoming a full-time writer,liked this quality in her work. I love the way and how soon?she uses words provocatively, the girl power. I really don‘t know. When the time is right,I much enjoyed Once, a little known I‘ll know. I don‘t think it‘s something youcollection of poems by Alice Walker. I think plan. For someone like me, there are all sortsshe wrote it when she was about 23, after of financial implications. I‘m not quite atvisiting Africa for the first time. It remains that stage yet.one of my favourite book of poems ever. Iliked the ‗noise‘ in Shange‘s work, her What do you set to achieve with your writings?complete disregard for rules. These days, I I hope that I give people pleasure. I hope Iread Phillip Levine, Anne Sexton, Sylvia can make people laugh. I hope I can make itPlath. I also have Nigerian poets that I love hard for certain people to live withlike Odia Ofeimun, Remi Raji, Tade themselves. I hope I can bring peace to theIpadeola, Niran Okewole, Chiedu Ezeanah, hearts of those who deserve it. I hope I canand there‘s a wonderful young poet called speak for those who have lost their voices.Richard Ali. Do you have any advice for budding writers? Is there any place for literary magazines in the Live hard, read hard, write hard. writing and publication process?I certainly hope so. Even in developed And finally, a question that has evoked verycountries, these publications can only exist diverse answers, why do you write?because they are supported by universities I derive immense pleasure from it and like Iand government endowments. In a place like have said before, it beats ironing and allNigeria where, year on year, the government other domestic endeavours.has systematically destroyed the educationalsystem, you can‘t help but ask who would 25:
  26. 26. A STREETCAR NAMED SUCCESS EXCERPTS FROM INTRODUCTION TO “A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE” BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMSNo, my experience was not exceptional, but wolf are all the little vanities and conceitsneither was it quite ordinary, and if you are and laxities that Success is heir to – why,willing to accept the somewhat eclectic then with this knowledge you are at least in aproposition that I had not been writing with position of knowing where danger lies.such an experience in mind – and manypeople are not willing to believe that a You know, then, that the public Somebodyplaywright is interested in anything but you are when you ―have a name‖ is a fictionpopular success – there may be some point in created with mirrors and that the onlycomparing the two estates. somebody worth being is the solitary and unseen you that existed from your firstOne does not escape…easily from the breath and which is the sum of your actionsseductions of an effete way of life. You and is constantly becoming under your owncannot arbitrarily say to yourself, I will now volition—and knowing these things, you cancontinue my life as it was before this thing. survive the catastrophe of Success!Success happened to me. But once you fullyapprehend the vacuity of a life without Wilbur Saroyan wrote a great play on thisstruggle you are equipped with the basic theme, that purity of heart is the one successmeans of salvation. Once you know this is worth having. ―In the time of your life—true, that the heart of man, his body and his live!‖ That time is short and it doesn‘t returnbrain, are forged in a white-hot furnace for again. It is slipping away while I write thisthe purpose of conflict…and that with the and while you read it, and the monosyllableconflict removed, the man is a sword cutting of the clock is Loss, Loss, Loss, unless youdaisies, that not privation but luxury is the decide your heart to its opposition.wolf at the door and that the fangs of this Copyright, 1947, The New York Times The full essay appeared in The New York Times Drama Section November 30, 1947—four days before the New York opening of A Streetcar Named Desire & As an Introduction to A Streetcar Named Desire Published by Signet, 1947 & 1974 26:
  27. 27. 3 BOOKS YOU’LL LOVE & WHYI DO NOT COME TO YOU BY CHANCE (By Adaobi Nwaubani)TOLU OGUNLESIA witty exploration of that graduate frustrated by failed attempts at getting a job, andworld-famous ‗industry‘ Boniface (―Cash Daddy‖), his equally brilliant (in street-that produces all those wisdom terms) but relatively unlearned Uncle who‘s become aletters that bombard our 419 kingpin, and earned himself a fortune. The lives of bothboxes day in day out, men overlap with increasing intensity, until tragedy strikes (Ipromising millions of wont spoil the surprise by saying more!).dollars in exchange formodest ―facilitation‖ fees. This is a novel about dashed hopes, deceit, tough decisions andSet in eastern Nigeria, the arrogant power of ill-gotten wealth. I Do Not Come to Youfeaturing as protagonists By Chance is one of the funniest novels of 2009, and BonifaceKingsley (―Kings‖), a the undisputed Fictional Man of the Year!brilliant University THE BETTER MAN (BY Anita Nair) UCHE PETER UMEZIs as enigmatic as the Indian rustic life it attempts to depict and fantasy, to offer thethrough its tapestry of colours, cuisine, conflicts, and reader a fluid, almostcharacters, all imbued with a rich folkloric charm that both musical, narrative in whichhaunts and entrances. The major protagonist, Mukundan, a they can draw sips ofretired public servant, more trapped in resolving his past than insight and delight.confronting his present, leads a throng of characters as rattlingas our fears. Nair knows how to meld pathos with comedy, factTESTIMONY (By Anita Shreve)AYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKETestimony is a compelling unleashes a catastrophic chain of events which destroysbook by Anita Shreve the lives of several people – many of whom were notwhich explores the participants in the orgy. Through the characters, theconsequences of a sex story reinforces strongly that actions do haveorgy carried out and consequences (some of which could be tragic). I wasvideoed within the enthralled by the multi-faceted angles and narrativeconfines of an upper-class style Shreve employed in telling this story. Alternatingboarding school. The between first, second and third person narratives worksunearthing of the video beautifully. 27:
  28. 28. ALL THE CONTRIBUTORSHere is an alphabetical list of all contributors Saraba’s had since February 2009; a homage of sorts, and then a call toduty. ABUBAKAR ADAM IBRAHIM ITUNU AKANDE ADEBIYI OLUSOLAPE JONEVE McCORMICK ADEMOLA SAMSON JUDE DIBIA AKEEM AKINNIYI KOLA TUBOSUN ARTHUR ANYADUBA KOLE ADE ODUTOLA AWI OLUWAFISAYO MORGAN OLUFEMI AYO ADEMILUYI NIRAN OKEWOLE AYOADE ADEOYE NUMERO UNOMA AYOBAMI ADEBAYO OKECHUKWU NWAFOR AYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKE OKOME OBUKOHURO RICHARD BENJAMIN UBIRI OLAOLUWA AKINLOLUWA BOLA AKINLOYE OLUFUNSO ORIMILOYE CHIAKA OBASI ORIMOLADE TOSIN CONSTANT-NGOZI OZURUMBA OSASONA MOFEHINTOLU DAMILOLA AJAYI PATRICK EBI AMANAMA DZEKASHU MACVIBAN PAUL ONANUGA EDOZIE UKA PELU AWOFESO EGHOSA IMASUEN QUDUS ONIKEKU ELNATHAN JOHN SYLVA NZE IFEDIGBO EMMANUEL IDUMA TEMITAYO OLOFINLUA EMMANUEL SIGAUKE TOBI ASO HILARY FRANK-ITO TOLU OGUNLESI IBUKUN BABARINDE UCHE PETER UMEZ IFEH AGBONMIRE ÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI ISOJE IYI-EWEKA CHOU WALE DUBOBO WIRNDZEREM G. BARFEE YAZEED KAMALDIEN 28:
  29. 29. ALL THE ISSUESALL AVAILABLE ON WWW.SARABAMAG.COMFebruary 2009: Family Issue. Guest-edited by Jumoke VerrisimoA Re-Issue published in September 2009.April 2009: City Life.July 2009: The Economy of Sound: Saraba‘s First Poetry Chapbook. Introduction by Tade IpadeolaAugust 2009: Economy IssueNovember 2009: Of Rhythm and Reason: Poetry Chapbook. Introduction by Niran OkewoleDecember 2009: The Story Issue 29:
  30. 30. THREE GOODWILLSTOBI ADEBOWALEIle-Ife, NigeriaIf there is a sentence that Saraba Magazine constantly reminds me of, its that of former BritishPrime Minister that ―every good thing that has been done, has been done by the youths.‖ SarabaMagazine has come to fill the gorge that has hitherto been swallowing optimism andopportunities, and in its place, erected a lasting institution that will awaken the literary giants inthis generation. A thousand kudos to such youthful, dynamic and cerebral publishers! From thefirst edition, it was evident that a lasting dream had been borne and from them on SarabaMagazine has not only grown in scope and influence but also in content. Saraba has nurturedmany more literary dreams, planting the seeds of zeal and irrigating dry paths with its blossomingfountain...Such dreams that birth many more dreams never die but are perpetually sustained. It‘s aconviction!NWILO BURA-BARI VPort Harcourt, NigeriaI was really glad to be introduced to the online literary magazine Saraba. I knew a time had comefor a revolution in the literary community of Nigeria. They have not fallen below my expectationsand I am sure they shall exceed the big project of getting Nigerians reading.AKIN AJAYIwww.guardian.co.ukThe success of websites such as…Saraba underscore the depth of talent on offer. By bypassingeconomic and geographic restrictions, they help to promote an enthusiasm for storytelling and fornarratives firmly rooted in the present.5 REASONS TO ADVERSTISE ON - Over 7,000 hits on www.sarabamag.com - Over 1,000 views on Issuu.com and links on notable literary websites. - Distributed to over 500 Literary Enthusiasts - We have published writers from Nigeria, London, Zimbabwe, Cameroun, Paris, and so on. - Facebook group with over 500 membersYou can advertise on the website (with links and summary of services), in the electronic magazineor in the chapbooks. See rates on the current issue of the magazine (Issue 4) or Contact Publishers. 30:
  31. 31. ISSUE 4 ERRATAIn our last issue, we made the underlisted mistakes. Our sincere apology to affected contributors.The use of the pronoun ‗he‘ for AYODELE MOROCCO-CLARKE in the Contributors‘ page waserroneous. It should read ‗she.‘NZE IFEDIGBO SYLVA should read SYLVA NZE IFEDIGBO. His short story should be titledDeath on Gimbiya Street not Death on Gimbaya Street as was published.Please download a newer version of the Issue with Bookmarks. 31:
  32. 32. PLANS FOR THE YEARMarch 2010THE (NIGER) DELTA ISSUE: Submissions for this issue have closed. This Issue wouldpublish the best of short stories, poetry, creative non-fiction and creative journalism on the NigerDelta. Plans include publishing already published works that explore the theme in a refreshing andincisive manner. Release date: March 20, 2010April 2010POETRY CHAPBOOK: Eighteen Poems by Three Poets (Adebiyi Olusolape, Damilola Ajayi andEmmanuel Iduma). This is in line with the decision of the Publishers to begin the publishing of awide range of works by individual writers.June 2010THE GOD (RELIGION) ISSUE: What we seek to highlight is beyond the exoticopportunity to write about religious fanaticism. We seek works that would question. For example,why would a mother kill her child in the name of God? How easily vulnerable are people toreligion and its pretences? These questions are questions. We do not seek to answer them. Wemight not give reasons for people blowing themselves up. It is inappropriately ambitious to thinkso. But in the end, we hope the success of this issue would be in our ability to present thesequestions in truth. It is important to add that a balance is sought in the exploration of this theme;how there exists the possibility of equity shining through in the face of apathy and destruction.Deadline: April 30, 2010. Release Date: June 20, 2010August 2010POETRY CHAPBOOK: Eighteen Poems by Three Poets. The poets would have similarity of styleor age. The poets are yet to be decided. If interested, contact us first before sendingin your work.September 2010THE TECH (TECHNOLOGY) ISSUE: How the computer, for example, has defined our lives.A sort of modern destiny. As Iduma asks, ―Could we say it‗s a multifaceted being, the kind ofbeing that receives rousing ovation in both heaven and hell, loved by God and Satan alike? ‖Whatever we choose to publish, it would explore the genius called technology, in all itsramifications, implications and complications. You might wish to add perplexities.Deadline: July 31, 2010. Release Date: September 20, 2010November 2010POETRY CHAPBOOK: This would be our only general chapbook for the year. Particularly wewould collect poems that are ‗nationalistic‘ in perspective. A small toast to Nigeria‘s GoldenJubilee celebration. Basically, this Chapbook would be a montage of sorts, and would include awide range of poems by emerging and ‗emerged‘ writers on the Nigerian theme. Please notify us ofyour interest. Do not send your works without obtaining prior consent to do so.December 2010THE STORY ISSUE: We are making it a tradition to publish short fiction and memoirs as themajor content of an issue once every year. For 2010, there‘d be no exception. The open secret isthat, as last year, we submit published short stories for the Caine Prize for African Writing .Deadline: October 31, 2010. Release Date: December 20, 2010 32:
  33. 33. Credits All Contributors have been previously published on Saraba, except ÜZEYIR LOKMAN ÇAYCI and JONEVE McCORMICK. See Back Issues and Chapbooks for complete bios. __ UZEYIR LOKMAN CAYCI, born in 1949 in Bor, Turkey, is a poet, artist, and writer with a degree inarchitecture and industrial design from The Fine Arts Academy in Istanbul. He has been drawing, painting and writing since childhood and has received many awards for his work, most recently from Radio NPS ofHolland and Les Amis de Thalie in France. Both his Poetry and Art are featured on many elegant websites. Uzeyir lives and works in Paris. __ Saraba is published four times a year by the Saraba Electronic Publishers on www.sarabamag.com. Copyright is held by Saraba Electronic Publishers and individual authors of work published herein. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Enquiries for reproduction can be directed to publishers@sarabamag.com. Interested contributors can visit the website for submission guidelines for the online magazine and chapbooks. The views expressed by contributors are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Saraba Electronic Magazine. This sub-issue is published on A4. __ ILLUSTRATIONS David Sparshott Succession Planning (Cover Illustration) CSR Becky Barnicoat There’s No One Thank You Pig Date Megan’s Card Vladstudio.com: Special Valentine Gift __ __ 33:
  34. 34. PUBLISHERS Damilola Ajayi Emmanuel Iduma FICTION EDITOR Arthur Anyaduba POETRY EDITOR Adebiyi OlusolapeNON-FICTION EDITOR Temitayo Olofinlua ONLINE EDITOR Ayobami Famurewa DESIGN Utopia‘s Project ut.ezeali@gmail.com WEBSITE Tosin Afolabi Dolapo Amusan CONTACT +234 (0) 806 005 0835 +234 (0) 806 703 3738publishers@sarabamag.com 34:
  35. 35. PUBLISHERS’ NOTEIt‘s a shame and a sham to lose experiments. Youcould say that this is an experiment, black and whiteand lines, and a slight shade of blue. But on thelarger, more intricate, scale, it is an experiment to seehow much success we can make from failure, and howmuch introspection we can make from goodwill. Thisjob—without pay—has taught us to believe increation, and to look upon our creation with wonder,awe and intensity. That is, if this is still our creation.You discover that it has become the creation of a largeraudience, even French poets, and that it has become aJuliet being loved by seasoned ‗diasporan‘ poets,amongst others. How we pray that it would neverbecome unloved!And so, now that you have read and glimpsed, do notlose experiments. Affirm, alongside us, that the best isyet to come, and that our journey has not begun.Happy first anniversary, Saraba; whoever you are.E.I. & D.A.February 2010 35:

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