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Maximizing minilessons

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From Dublin Leadership Academy 2012

From Dublin Leadership Academy 2012

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Transcript

  • 1. Maximizing MinilessonsFranki Sibberson and Tony KeeferDublin Leadership Academy 2012
  • 2. A Lifelong ConversationAround Books and Reading
  • 3. What are mybeliefs about Minilessons?
  • 4. #1 Designed with a vision of helping students gain the necessary skills,strategies, and behaviors to become independent readers.  #2 Scaffolded across time to deepen and enrich understanding ofconcepts. They are not activities delivered in isolation.  #3 Part of larger conversations that we as a community have about ourreading lives and that these conversations build over time.  #4 Interactive. Students should be the ones doing the thinking, not theteacher.  #5 Planned with the needs of current students in mind. They cant becanned, scripted or duplicated year after year.  
  • 5. #6 The right length to match your teaching point. There is no magicnumber of minutes for an effective minilesson.  #7 Organized in a way that makes the most sense to the teacher, school,or district. There is no one right way to organize lessons.  #8 Based on what we know about teaching and learning. No matter themandates and pressures of state testing, there is no reason to compromisebest teaching practice.  #9 Designed to teach the reader not the book.  #10 Designed by the teachers who is doing the teaching, notcorporations.
  • 6. Minilesson Cycles Can Be Lots of Ways to Plan Strategies—comprehension, word work Behaviors and Habits—book choice, stamina Literary Elements—character, theme Genre—nonfiction, mystery, historical fiction
  • 7. What Are We Assessing?What we don’t do, however,is use our experience todirect or guide towards ourown understanding of anygiven text…..we need toteach each student the wayreaders think as they read,not what to think, helpingthem to experience texts asreaders, rather that puttingspecific thoughts about
  • 8. The Stranger
  • 9. Unpacking Standards: Plot K-Retell or re-enact a story that has been heard. 1-Retell the beginning, middle and ending of a story including its important events. 2-Retell the plot of a story. 3-Retell the plot sequence. 4-Identify the main incidents of a plot sequence, identifying the major conflict and its resolution. 5-Identify the main incidents of a plot sequence and how they influence future action.
  • 10. PlotA story with veryobvious problem and solution
  • 11. Two stories with similar plots todiscuss parts of a story.
  • 12. Unpacking theCommon Core
  • 13. Characters We learn about characters through theirrelationships with others.
  • 14. CharacterWe learn about a character from the way he/she behaves andreacts in a story.
  • 15. Character Readers learnabout characters by the thingsthey say. (voice)
  • 16. CharacterThe more we knowabout a character, the better we can predict andunderstand his/her actions and behaviors.
  • 17. Character Important characters in a book oftenchange over the course of the story.
  • 18. Big Picture of Theme Cycle: What Am I Setting Up?Understandings I Want My Students to Come Away With in this Cycle *Readers have the power to determine the theme in a text. Authors often write a story with a bigger message about life to the reader. There is often more than one theme in a book. There are universal themes that appear often in books. A theme works across an entire piece.  
  • 19. How do they get there from where they are now?Plot vs. ThemeStated vs. Implied ThemeWhen Two Storylines Come TogetherRepeated LanguageSymbolism/MetaphorsGeneral vs. Specific ThemeUniversal Themes
  • 20. YouTube Video Clipshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dv015LtqA0A Danny MacGaskill
  • 21. Stated Vs.Implied Theme 24
  • 22. A Circle of Friends Wordless BookA Good First Look at Title Significance of word “circle”
  • 23. The Enormous Turnip Traditional Tales with obvious and accessible themes are a great way to introduce the concept of theme as well as universal themes to students.
  • 24. Artie and JulieHow do Storylines come together?
  • 25. Many Stories of Friendship
  • 26. Wanda’s Roses/The Curious Garden
  • 27. A Menu of OptionsTitles are often ametaphor and a clue into the theme of the story.
  • 28. Walk On!A Guide for Babies of All Ages By Marla Frazee Dedication“to my son, Graham, off to college”
  • 29. WRITING MINILESSONS
  • 30. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING
  • 31. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING1) The needs of my students come first when I think about planning.
  • 32. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING1) The needs of my students come first when I think about planning.2) Students in my class are too valuable to leave the planning for writingcompletely to a canned program or just pulling same lessons from aprevious year.
  • 33. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING1) The needs of my students come first when I think about planning.2) Students in my class are too valuable to leave the planning for writingcompletely to a canned program or just pulling same lessons from aprevious year.3) Curriculum guidelines like CCSS are very important, but I cannot assumethe children in my class are a perfect match with those guidelines.
  • 34. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING1) The needs of my students come first when I think about planning.2) Students in my class are too valuable to leave the planning for writingcompletely to a canned program or just pulling same lessons from aprevious year.3) Curriculum guidelines like CCSS are very important, but I cannot assumethe children in my class are a perfect match with those guidelines.4) I work hard to find resources to support growth in the writers I teach.
  • 35. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING1) The needs of my students come first when I think about planning.2) Students in my class are too valuable to leave the planning for writingcompletely to a canned program or just pulling same lessons from aprevious year.3) Curriculum guidelines like CCSS are very important, but I cannot assumethe children in my class are a perfect match with those guidelines.4) I work hard to find resources to support growth in the writers I teach.5) I think it is important for children to showcase their thinking duringminilessons. It shouldn’t be just me blabbing away.
  • 36. BELIEFS ABOUT PLANNING1) The needs of my students come first when I think about planning.2) Students in my class are too valuable to leave the planning for writingcompletely to a canned program or just pulling same lessons from aprevious year.3) Curriculum guidelines like CCSS are very important, but I cannot assumethe children in my class are a perfect match with those guidelines.4) I work hard to find resources to support growth in the writers I teach.5) I think it is important for children to showcase their thinking duringminilessons. It shouldn’t be just me blabbing away.6) I plan for both the short term growth and the future growth of the writersin my room. I want the individual minilessons to be connected to a largerongoing conversation about writing as the year progresses..
  • 37. WHERE TO BEGIN?
  • 38. BIG PICTURE COMPONENTS NEEDS OF THE STUDENTS • Where are they as writers? • What skills do they already possess? • Where do you want them to be at the end of a project? • What are the new skills or techniques they will need?
  • 39. BIG PICTURE COMPONENTS CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS • CCSS expectations for your grade level • CCSS expectations for grade above and below • District expectations • Your own expectations
  • 40. BIG PICTURE COMPONENTS RESOURCES AVAILABLE • Your own experiences • Professional books • Team or grade level colleagues • Online resources
  • 41. BIG PICTURE COMPONENTS CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS NEEDS OF THE STUDENTS RESOURCES AVAILABLE SWEETSPOT
  • 42. MENU OF OPTIONS O0OH ... the possibilities
  • 43. CREATING YOUR MENU
  • 44. CREATING YOUR MENU
  • 45. CREATING YOUR MENU Comes from previous work, conversations, and previous lesson cycles. Think formative assessment.
  • 46. CREATING YOUR MENU Comes from previous work, conversations, and previous lesson cycles. Think formative assessment. For me, the most important part of launching a minilesson cycle is creating authenticity. “How can I help my students see the power of their own writing.”
  • 47. CREATING YOUR MENU Comes from previous work, conversations, and previous lesson cycles. Think formative assessment. For me, the most important part of launching a minilesson cycle is creating authenticity. “How can I help my students see the power of their own writing.”I use this area to jot ideas after the first two days. I want to see the flow oflearning within the writing workshop.
  • 48. CREATING YOUR MENU
  • 49. CREATING YOUR MENU Comes from your interpretation of the standards within your focus for the cycle. Try not to “over plan” here. What will be the format of the work produced?
  • 50. CREATING YOUR MENU Comes from your interpretation of the standards within your focus for the cycle. Try not to “over plan” here. What will be the format of the work produced? What will be your focus for ongoing assessment? How will you assess the final project? What tools will you give students to empower self-assessment?
  • 51. CREATING YOUR MENU Comes from your interpretation of the standards within your focus for the cycle. Try not to “over plan” here. What will be the format of the work produced? What will be your focus for ongoing assessment? How will you assess the final project? What tools will you give students to empower self-assessment?It may seem simple because it is our job to TEACH, but I struggle at times tonot do too much work. This is where I jot notes to remind me to helpwithout doing too much work for my students.
  • 52. CREATING YOUR MENU
  • 53. NCREATING YOUR MENU F U
  • 54. NCREATING YOUR MENU I look for: F U
  • 55. NCREATING YOUR MENU I look for: F U 1) Ideas from my past experiences (as a teacher and my life).
  • 56. NCREATING YOUR MENU I look for: F U 1) Ideas from my past experiences (as a teacher and my life). 2) Ideas found in the words of ‘the experts’
  • 57. NCREATING YOUR MENU I look for: F U 1) Ideas from my past experiences (as a teacher and my life). 2) Ideas found in the words of ‘the experts’ 3) Ideas that can be launched from quality books or other texts.
  • 58. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE
  • 59. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: What do they already know? (Let’s imagine ...)
  • 60. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: What do they already know? (Let’s imagine ...) 1) Stories have a beginning, middle and end.
  • 61. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: What do they already know? (Let’s imagine ...) 1) Stories have a beginning, middle and end. 2) You should check your work for mistakes.
  • 62. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: What do they already know? (Let’s imagine ...) 1) Stories have a beginning, middle and end. 2) You should check your work for mistakes. 3) Personal narratives are true stories about yourself.
  • 63. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: What do they already know? (Let’s imagine ...) 1) Stories have a beginning, middle and end. 2) You should check your work for mistakes. 3) Personal narratives are true stories about yourself. 4) Stories are better if they have interesting details.
  • 64. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE
  • 65. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: Launching Ideas
  • 66. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: Launching Ideas 1) The power of story.
  • 67. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: Launching Ideas 1) The power of story. 2) Set the stage to “de-school-ify” the work.
  • 68. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Students: Launching Ideas 1) The power of story. 2) Set the stage to “de-school-ify” the work. 3) Build the stance that we all have worthwhile stories to share.
  • 69. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVECurriculum (CCSS focus)
  • 70. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVECurriculum (CCSS focus)
  • 71. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVECurriculum (CCSS focus)The idea of dialogue and description to enhance a narrativecould be very powerful as a focus.
  • 72. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVECurriculum (CCSS focus)
  • 73. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVECurriculum (CCSS focus)
  • 74. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVECurriculum (CCSS focus)The craft of creating a variety of well written sentencestructures is a big deal in almost every form of writing.
  • 75. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction
  • 76. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction s e rc ous Re al on si es of Pr
  • 77. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction s e Childrens’ Books rc ous Re al on si es of Pr
  • 78. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction s e Childrens’ Books rc ous Re al on si es Online Texts of Pr
  • 79. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction
  • 80. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction Professional Resources 1) Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher 2) The Revision Toolbox by Georgia Heard 3) How to Write Your Life Story by Ralph Fletcher 4) Lessons that Change Writers by Nancie Atwell 5) Two Writing Teachers Website (“Tools” page is very helpful)
  • 81. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction
  • 82. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction Children’s Books Look for quality stories that are told by a first person narrator. An authentic personal story would be great, but you can still learn from realistic fictional narratives. 1) Owl Moon by Jane Yolen 2) 26 Fairmont Ave by Tomie dePaolo 3) Up North at the Cabin by Martha Wilson Chall 4) Puddles by Jonathan London 5) The Relatives Came by Cynthia Rylant 6) Fly Away Home by Eve Bunting 7) A Sweet Smell of Roses by Angela Johnson 8) Shortcut by Donald Crews 9) Guys Write for Guys Read compiled by Jon Scieszka 10) Knucklehead by Jon Scieszka
  • 83. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Resources to Scaffold Instruction Online Texts This can be overwhelming and it takes time to muddle through the good and the bad. When looking for narrative style posts, I go to these two resources: 1) Two Writing Teachers “Slice of Life” (look for the logo, and go to comments thread for each post) 2) Edudemic Student Blog List
  • 84. CREATING A MENU FOR PERSONAL NARRATIVE Pulling it all together 1) Plan for more minilessons than you think you will need. This will help you adapt to needs of students in your room. The added bonus is some of the lessons you have planned may be perfect for later in the year. 2) Try different lessons or use different resources for your 2-3 big goals for the unit. This will help reinforce key ideas so key learning sticks. 3) When looking at a book to launch a specific lesson, read it for other planning purposes as well. This will help also you later. 4) Plan for organized success, but expect some failure.
  • 85. ON A YEARLONG PATH Whatever minilesson cycle you are planning, think connections to big picture ideas. The power of thoughtful, intentional planning in the workshop model is the connections your students make as they are becoming better readers and writers.
  • 86. INSPIRATIONUSUALLY COMES DURING WORKRATHER THANBEFORE IT Madeline L’Engle
  • 87. ONLINE SLIDE LOCATIONS http://readingyear.blogspot.com/ http://tonykeefer.tumblr.com/ http://www.slideshare.net/franki22 http://www.slideshare.net/TonyKeefer
  • 88. IMAGE CREDITSAll photos have been released by artists through CreativeCommons Licenses.Question Mark Graffiti by Bilal KamoonOld Sonic Menu by KB35Video Rocket Blastoff by Steve JurvetsonPuzzle Perspective by JugboPath Most Taken by Donald Lee ParduePhilips Lightbulb by dvanzuijlekom