Human resourcesv1

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  • Human Resource Management What is HRM? Is there a difference between HRM and Personnel Management What is the function of HRM in an organisation? A complex range of functions calling on a wide range of knowledge and expertise Human Resource Information System
  • Simply put it is about helping the organisation attract, retaining and developing skilled resources to meet their strategic goals. Its looking at the functions of the business and decisions and taking action actions. Human Resources is a term used to describe the individuals who comprise the workforce of an organisation. It is also the name of a function within an organisation charged with the overall responsibility for implementing strategies and policies relating to the management of individuals.
  • To understand personnel management we have to go back to the
  • Industrial Welfare back in the 19 th century was the first form of Personnel Management. The 1800 saw the emergence of various legislations and the trade unions as individuals realised the strength of joining together to negotiate with employers. 1833 the Factories Act was put into place and the first Factory Inspector (male) was appointed and 1896 Mary Wood who worked for Rowntree’s in York was appointed as an industrial welfare officer (what we would refer to as a Personnel Officer). In 1913 with Industrial Welfare Workers numbers growing to 60+ the Welfare Workers Association was formed (which after many years and many changes is today called the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development). During the inter-war years the role of the Industrial Welfare Officer was very successful, so much so that in 1916 the Munitions Ministry set up its own Industrial Welfare department, with an aim to introducing new welfare personnel policies in to factories. It became compulsory to have a welfare worker in explosion factories (strongly recommended in munitions factories). Lots of work was being done in other areas such as research into ability and IQ testing and a lot was learnt about the need for efficient selection methods. The second world war saw the areas of personnel spread to recruitment and selection, then training, improving morale and motivation; discipline; health and safety. This expansion of duties required the establishment of a department with trained staff. Joint consultation between management and workforce spread during the war and personnel departments became responsible for the organisation and administration. Increased emphasis on health and safety enhanced the need for a spokes person to liaise with the trade unions and shop stewards (ie Industrial Relations). The importance of Industrial Relation grew in the 1970 ’ s with some personnel managers having authority to negotiate deals about pay or other collective issues. During the 1970 ’ s the growth in legislation and personnel function often took on the role of specialist adviser, in an effort to avoid industrial tribunals.
  • During the inter-war years the role of the Industrial Welfare Officer was very successful, so much so that in 1916 the Munitions Ministry set up its own Industrial Welfare Department, with the aim of introducing new welfare personnel policies into factories. It became compulsory to have a welfare worker in explosive factories (strongly recommended in munitions factories). Lots of work was also being done in other areas such as research into ability and IQ testing and a lot was learnt about the need for efficient selection methods. The second world war saw the areas of personnel spread to recruitment and selection; then training; improving morale and motivation; discipline; health and safety. This expansion of duties required the establishment of a department with trained staff. Joint consultation between management and workforce spread during the war and personnel departments became responsible for the organisation and administration of employees. Increased emphasis on health and safety enhanced the need for a spokes person to liaise with the trade unions and shop stewards (ie Industrial Relations). The importance of Industrial Relation grew in the 1970 ’ s with some personnel managers having authority to negotiate deals about pay or other collective issues. The 1970 ’ s saw a growth in legislation and personnel function which often incorporated the role of specialist adviser, in an effort to avoid industrial tribunals.
  • During the inter-war years the role of the Industrial Welfare Officer was very successful, so much so that in 1916 the Munitions Ministry set up its own Industrial Welfare Department, with the aim of introducing new welfare personnel policies into factories. It became compulsory to have a welfare worker in explosive factories (strongly recommended in munitions factories). Lots of work was also being done in other areas such as research into ability and IQ testing and a lot was learnt about the need for efficient selection methods. The second world war saw the areas of personnel spread to recruitment and selection; then training; improving morale and motivation; discipline; health and safety. This expansion of duties required the establishment of a department with trained staff. Joint consultation between management and workforce spread during the war and personnel departments became responsible for the organisation and administration of employees. Increased emphasis on health and safety enhanced the need for a spokes person to liaise with the trade unions and shop stewards (ie Industrial Relations). The importance of Industrial Relation grew in the 1970 ’ s with some personnel managers having authority to negotiate deals about pay or other collective issues. The 1970 ’ s saw a growth in legislation and personnel function which often incorporated the role of specialist adviser, in an effort to avoid industrial tribunals.
  • During the inter-war years the role of the Industrial Welfare Officer was very successful, so much so that in 1916 the Munitions Ministry set up its own Industrial Welfare Department, with the aim of introducing new welfare personnel policies into factories. It became compulsory to have a welfare worker in explosive factories (strongly recommended in munitions factories). Lots of work was also being done in other areas such as research into ability and IQ testing and a lot was learnt about the need for efficient selection methods. The second world war saw the areas of personnel spread to recruitment and selection; then training; improving morale and motivation; discipline; health and safety. This expansion of duties required the establishment of a department with trained staff. Joint consultation between management and workforce spread during the war and personnel departments became responsible for the organisation and administration of employees. Increased emphasis on health and safety enhanced the need for a spokes person to liaise with the trade unions and shop stewards (ie Industrial Relations). The importance of Industrial Relation grew in the 1970 ’ s with some personnel managers having authority to negotiate deals about pay or other collective issues. The 1970 ’ s saw a growth in legislation and personnel function which often incorporated the role of specialist adviser, in an effort to avoid industrial tribunals.
  • Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job with in the organisation The person skilled in hrm establishes policies , standards and procedures, to integrate these with the organisation’s objectives, to provide advice and consistency, and to co-ordinate and provide training and development. Initiating company-wide programmes such as involvement, communication and consultation. The exact nature of the hrm’s involvement will vary from organisation to organisation as will the range of activities they will be involved in. The central function of HRM will maintain records on people and may provide advice and expertise for other managers to draw on. More and more in organisations today are devolving aspects of the personnel activities to line managers. The role of an hrm can be of a generalist nature which involves them in most activities and there are the specialist areas such as training and development, rewards resourcing and employee relations. How many of you are working or in the process of trying to find a job ?(show of hands please) What is the function of HRM in an organisation? A complex range of functions calling on a wide range of knowledge and expertise Human Resource Information System These are the areas the most HR/Personnel managers are likely to be involved. Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job
  • Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job with in the organisation The person skilled in hrm establishes policies , standards and procedures, to integrate these with the organisation’s objectives, to provide advice and consistency, and to co-ordinate and provide training and development. Initiating company-wide programmes such as involvement, communication and consultation. The exact nature of the hrm’s involvement will vary from organisation to organisation as will the range of activities they will be involved in. The central function of HRM will maintain records on people and may provide advice and expertise for other managers to draw on. More and more in organisations today are devolving aspects of the personnel activities to line managers. The role of an hrm can be of a generalist nature which involves them in most activities and there are the specialist areas such as training and development, rewards resourcing and employee relations. How many of you are working or in the process of trying to find a job ?(show of hands please) What is the function of HRM in an organisation? A complex range of functions calling on a wide range of knowledge and expertise Human Resource Information System These are the areas the most HR/Personnel managers are likely to be involved. Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job
  • How many of you are working or in the process of trying to find a job ?(show of hands please) What is the function of HRM in an organisation? A complex range of functions calling on a wide range of knowledge and expertise Human Resource Information System These are the areas the most HR/Personnel managers are likely to be involved. Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job
  • How many of you are working or in the process of trying to find a job ?(show of hands please) What is the function of HRM in an organisation? A complex range of functions calling on a wide range of knowledge and expertise Human Resource Information System These are the areas the most HR/Personnel managers are likely to be involved. Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job
  • How many of you are working or in the process of trying to find a job ?(show of hands please) What is the function of HRM in an organisation? A complex range of functions calling on a wide range of knowledge and expertise Human Resource Information System These are the areas the most HR/Personnel managers are likely to be involved. Aspects of managing human resource is in some way in every managers/supervisors role A function and a part of the job
  • What is the function of HRM in an organisation? Overall they implement and carryout specialist activities which relate to employment and the treatment of employees within the organisation or company.
  • Human resourcesv1

    1. 1. Human Resources Management Week 11 Business IT/Systems
    2. 2. Human Resource Management <ul><li>What is meant by the term Human Resource Management (HRM)? </li></ul><ul><li>‘ (HRM) is the strategic and coherent approach to the management of an organisation's most valued assets - the people working there who individually and collectively contribute to the achievement of the objectives of the business. </li></ul><ul><li> Armstrong, Michael (2006) </li></ul><ul><li>‘’ ....those decisions and actions which concern the management of employees at all levels in the business and which are related to the implementation of strategies directed towards creating and sustaining competitive advantage.’ </li></ul><ul><li>Miller (1987) </li></ul>
    3. 3. The origin of HRM <ul><li>The terms &quot;human resource management&quot; and &quot;human resources&quot; (HR) have largely replaced the term &quot;personnel management&quot; as a description of the processes involved in managing people in organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>Personnel Management is defined as: </li></ul><ul><li>‘ a series of activities which: first enable working people and their employing organisations to agree about the objectives and nature of their working relationship and secondly ensures that the agreement is fulfilled .’ </li></ul><ul><li>Torrington and Hall (1987) </li></ul>
    4. 4. From PM to HRM <ul><li>The 1800’s saw the emergence of various legislations supporting welfare and the forming of trade unions, as individuals realised the strength of joining together to negotiate with employers. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1833 the Factories Act was put into place along with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the first Factory Inspector (male) appointment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>in 1896 Mary Wood who worked for Rowntree’s in York was appointed as an Industrial Welfare Officer (what we would refer to as a Personnel Officer). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In 1913 with Industrial Welfare Workers numbers growing to 60+ the Welfare Workers Association was formed (which after many years and many changes is today called the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development). </li></ul>
    5. 5. From PM to HRM <ul><li>During the inter-war years the role of the Industrial Welfare Officer was very successful, and gained great recognition. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1916 the Munitions Ministry set up its own Industrial Welfare Department with the aim of introducing new welfare personnel policies into factories. </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of work was also being done in other areas, such as research into ability and IQ testing and the need for efficient selection methods . </li></ul><ul><li>The Second World War saw the areas of personnel spread to recruitment and selection ; training ; improving morale and motivation; discipline; health and safety. </li></ul>
    6. 6. From PM to HRM <ul><li>Joint consultation between management and the workforce spread during the war and personnel departments became responsible for the organisation and administration of employees. </li></ul><ul><li>The 1970 ’ s saw a growth in legislation and the personnel function which often incorporated the role of specialist adviser . The importance of Industrial Relation grew in the 1970 ’ s with some Personnel Managers having authority to negotiate deals about pay or other collective issues. </li></ul><ul><li>1990 ’ s there was the trend for flexible working (hours worked, part-time, temporary contracts and working from home). This raised a lot of challenges for employers who needed to develop new policies for a diverse workforce. </li></ul>
    7. 7. From PM to HRM <ul><li>Today the 24/7 work culture and its complexities have put great pressure on employers to ensure a healthy, safe and rewarding work environment. </li></ul><ul><li>The role of HRM has evolved so much that it cannot be confined to the HR domain, with some activities being devolved to line management (ie. recruitment and selection, performance appraisals, disciplinary, promotions and rewards). </li></ul>
    8. 8. Activities of HRM <ul><li>Recruitment and Selection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>implementation of policies and procedures for fair recruitment and selection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>job descriptions and person specifications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>fulfilment of organisational goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance on interview techniques </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance on ability and psychometric testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance on terms and conditions of employment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Employee Contracts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>particulars and statements of employment </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Activities of HRM <ul><li>Human Resource Planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>strategic direction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>data collection and SWOT Analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>headcount </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>organisational structure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Training and Development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>planning to meet the organisations strategic goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>continuous professional development for individuals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>monitoring employee skills base </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Activities of HRM <ul><li>Equality & Diversity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance and policies on disabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance and policies on equal opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance and policies on positive action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance and policies on cultural and social awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>monitoring the effectiveness policies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>part, full and flexible working </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Performance Appraisal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>rewards, promotions, bonuses </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Activities of HRM <ul><li>Employee Relations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>health and safety </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>welfare, well being </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>support, counselling, consultation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Grievance and Disciplinary </li></ul><ul><ul><li>guidance and advice on policy, process and procedure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>maintaining records </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>training </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Activities of HRM <ul><li>Employee Engagement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>creating a culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>employee participation in decision making </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Compensations and Benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>advice and guidance on remunerations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>advice and guidance on rewards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>advice and guidance on bonuses </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Industrial Relations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>unions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>tribunals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>negotiations </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Be strategic with your workforce <ul><li>Knowing where wealth and value is created - who does it and where is it done in the organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Having good information about the workforce </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the strategy of the business and workforce </li></ul><ul><li>Who and what in the workforce creates custom and economic value </li></ul><ul><li>What positions really make a difference – the top talent </li></ul><ul><li>Aligning and understand business strategy and the profound workforce implication that it can have </li></ul><ul><li>Finding the talent - hiring someone that loves and is interested in what you do </li></ul><ul><li>Putting ‘A’ players in ‘A’ roles </li></ul><ul><li>HR, how do they leverage the positions that make a difference? Through selection, development, measurement, rewards, communications, design of work </li></ul>
    14. 14. The function of HRM <ul><li>Strategy (strategic) direction of the organisation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a managerial process requiring human resource (HR) policies and practices to be linked with the strategic objectives of the organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Management of resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the way for an organisation to best meet the needs of its employees , and for the employee to best meet the needs the organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Advice for employee (individual or groups) and line management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialist and General advice and guidance covering HR legislation, policies, procedures, and best practice </li></ul></ul>A complex and extensive range of activities fall under the HRM function and a wide scope of knowledge and expertise is required.
    15. 15. Strategy <ul><li>SWOT </li></ul><ul><li>PESTEL </li></ul><ul><li>Forward planning </li></ul>
    16. 16. Management <ul><li>Skills deployment </li></ul><ul><li>Training and development </li></ul><ul><li>Appraisal </li></ul><ul><li>Recruitment </li></ul><ul><li>Line Management responsibilities </li></ul>
    17. 17. Advice <ul><li>Specialist Managers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Payments, Rewards and Benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training and development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grievances and Disciplinary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Equality and Diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employee Relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Industrial Relations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Generalist Managers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This type of manager would have an extensive knowledge of the HR activities and functions </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Hard HRM <ul><li>to serve the organisational strategy and achieve organisational aims by the means of a high performance workforce </li></ul><ul><li>the dominance of business needs means that the human resources will be acquired, deployed and dispensed with as organisational plans demand. Little regard is paid to the needs of those human resources and the emphasis is on quantitative aspects. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Soft HRM <ul><li>in order to gain a competitive advantage through the workforce, regardless of whether they are full or part-time, temporary or contract staff, all potential must be nurtured and developed , and programmes which pay due notice to knowledge about the behavioural aspects of people at work are developed </li></ul>
    20. 20. Further Information <ul><li>References : </li></ul><ul><li>Core Text : Foot M. and Hook C., 2002, Introducing Human Resource Management, Prentice Education Ltd, Harlow England </li></ul>

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