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  • 1. European ESSI Systems & Software Initiative ESSI Process Improvement Experiment (PIE) Annex I - Project Programme Project nr.: 27818 Project title: Soft NUGGETS: Component-based Software Engineering for Data Mining Applications Acronym: NUGGETS Version: 3.0 Date: 11-05-1998
  • 2. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 CONTENTS PART 1: FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE DATA......................................................................................3 1.1 Summary.................................................................................................................................................3 PART 2: DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT..................................................................................................5 2.1 Project objectives....................................................................................................................................5 2.2 Main Business of Participant and Motivation for the PIE.........................................................................5 2.3 Current Status and Required Corrective Actions....................................................................................6 2.4 Definition of the Baseline Project ...........................................................................................................7 2.5 Definition of Experiment - in Context of the Baseline Project .................................................................7 2.6 Anticipated Benefits and Commercial Impact .........................................................................................8 2.7 Measurement of Results.......................................................................................................................10 2.8 Transferability of Experience and Dissemination Activities...................................................................10 2.9 Phased Workplan..................................................................................................................................13 2.12 Glossary of terms................................................................................................................................19 11/05/1998 Page 2 of 19
  • 3. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 PART 1: FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE DATA 1.1 Summary Sentient Machine Research is specialised in the development of Data Mining applications employing adaptive and associative search techniques. Over the years we have delivered a range of system solutions including matching systems for the labour market, a visual data mining tool for database marketing (DataDetective), search and face recognition systems used by the Dutch Police, etc. Historically, because of the wide range of application domains and data modalities we are involved in, our organisation contains development teams that operate separately to a large extend. As a result, there is relatively little exchange of knowledge and half-products and also little interchange of development tasks. We believe we can tackle problems like project-delay and lacking software quality by developing and exchanging reusable software and by distributing the available knowledge. Furthermore, by dynamically combining team efforts into the project that needs the most attention we would be able to deliver a higher peak performance. In short: we intend to combine resources, knowledge and half-products, that have been separated too long. This initiative forms part of a Total Quality Management project that aims to improve our entire organisation. The focus in this project is an experiment regarding the implementation of a component-based software development organisation. We will apply a component-based approach to the building of a Web-based search application with various functionality’s including: fuzzy search in a structured database, classification and retrieval of pictures and context sensitive search in free-text information. Historically, these functionalities have been designed within separate departments. The experiment will deliver the following feedback to our organisation and others via the planned dissemination: • Better understanding of methods of building components • Better use of components for building applications • Better control of complex software engineering projects • Measurements of quality and productivity of enterprise-wide component-based approach The changing of the software engineering process will involve all of our current development staff totalling 18 engineers. However, new functions will be created (e.g. a Component Repository Librarian) where needed to assure continuity in the efforts. The experiment will be further supported by additional tools, training and the visiting of relevant congresses and seminars. External consultants will be hired where necessary. Particularly in bringing to bear the experiences from large internationally operating software development companies that already apply component based methods external consultancy is deemed useful. An increased reuse maturity level for the whole organisation is expected to be the major benefit of the experiment. Improvements in the software engineering process will lead to better quality. The flexible component-based infrastructure will make it easier to adapt new technologies and make us competitive in the rapidly changing software industry. From the commercial point of view, this will form the basis for an increased competitiveness on the existing market and on the evolving international market. Summarised the anticipated benefits and commercial impacts will be: • Building better systems faster. • Linking isolated islands of technology. • Increasing developer productivity and promoting a flexible workforce. • Reducing maintenance efforts and costs. General benefits from the current project may be expected for European software engineering companies who, through dissemination of our experiences from this project (see 2.8) may be stimulated and helped in developing their own software production process in the direction of increased componentialisation. There may particularly be benefits for companies active in data mining, either as producers or as users, because the current project indirectly addresses one of the main bottlenecks in wide scale employment of data mining procedures. In current endeavours for the development of data mining procedures and methodology, such as the Crisp.DM Esprit project, it has been recognised that successful data mining requires both a high degree of vertical specialisation (different techniques and methods for different application domains) and a high degree 11/05/1998 Page 3 of 19
  • 4. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 of horizontal integration within user organisations (different datastreams and different user tasks must be integrated within the data mining process). Currently, these requirements are both hindered by the rather monolithic nature of most data mining environments: dominant tools tend to be large and complex general purpose solutions that are used mainly by technically sophisticated analysts, and cannot be easily or flexibly embedded within a particular task environment for non-technical end users. We hope to be able to demonstrate in the long run that componentialisation of data mining functionality's is the critical factor in order to achieve, through vertical specialisation and horizontal integration, an open, extendable and flexible embedding of advanced functionality's in wide ranges of end user task-environments. 11/05/1998 Page 4 of 19
  • 5. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 PART 2: DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT 2.1 Project objectives The following objectives have been defined in the scope of the baseline project. Increased productivity, measured in Lines of Code (LOC) per man-hour We expect a productivity increase of 20%. Yardstick: on average our programmers produce 33 lines of code per hour. The goal is 40. Excluded from the measured activities are efforts that make components out of existing software. Increased correctness, measured in discovered errors / KLOC before and after delivery. We expect a decrease of 30% in total errors. Yardstick: on average there are 13.6 errors per 1,000 lines before delivery and 6 errors after. Goals are 9.5 and 4.2 By errors we mean any anomalies which are discovered, both during development time and after delivery. After delivery a model will be used to project the number of error discoveries in the first three months onto the total estimated number. Increased maintainability, Measured by MTTC (mean time to change): time to analyse, design and implement change. This is measured the same way as productivity: LOC / man-hour. Expected: an increase of 30% in productivity for software functionality changes after delivery Yardstick: on average change development is done at a rate of 15 lines per hour. Goal is 19.5. Increased planning accuracy, measured in days too late/early per total days duration planned We expect the real project duration not to differ more than 10% from the planned duration. Yardstick: our average project duration exceeds the planned duration by 25% 2.2 Main Business of Participant and Motivation for the PIE Sentient Machine Research was founded in 1990 with the objective to turn adaptive technology such as neural networks, machine learning and fuzzy logic into feasible solutions for business problems. We focus on data mining, image processing and information retrieval applications. Practical examples include predicting customer response, matching applicants with vacancies and searching police records ('mugshots') with an example photo. Sentient Machine Research has developed a proprietary adaptive technology, which is the core of the 'DataDetective' data mining environment. Our revenues come from consultancy, data analysis and development of tools and tailor made information systems. Our customer base includes banks, insurance companies, publishers, television companies, telecommunication companies and the police. In Holland, Sentient Machine Research is the oldest independent company with adaptive solutions as its core business. There are four main development lines within the company, which roughly correspond to distinct development teams: • ADAM (Adaptive Data Analysis Modules): Main group, develops solutions for advanced data analysis of structured information stored in large databases (Data Mining) • PIRES: analysis of image and video information (image processing) 11/05/1998 Page 5 of 19
  • 6. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 • OMA: analysis of free texts and semantics (information retrieval) • SUIDM: analysis, storage and inference of knowledge and concepts (knowledge engineering) One of the main objectives of the ADAM, already from the start of company, was to provide a platform for module reuse and generation of tailor made data mining applications. However, basis of the ADAM development process is presently a central module, with connections to a windows graphical user interface. Only the ADAM group can generate ADAM applications. In future we would like to have a distributed development process in which all groups can use modules from other groups. We experience a growing demand from our customers to develop tailor made applications that assemble different sources of information, such as databases, images, free text or knowledge. There is also a growing demand for mixed types of integration with users and existing systems, such as web based user interfaces instead of standard GUI's and integration with other products, databases, other platforms and information architectures. An increased reuse maturity level for the whole organisation is expected to be the major benefit of the experiment. Improvements in the software engineering process will lead to better quality. The flexible component-based infrastructure will make it easier to adapt new technologies and make us competitive in the rapidly changing software industry. From the commercial point of view, this will form the basis for an increased competitiveness on the existing market and on the evolving international market. 2.3 Current Status and Required Corrective Actions Historically our organisation contains development teams that operate separately. There is little exchange of knowledge and half-products. We believe we can tackle problems like project-delay and lacking software quality by exchanging reusable software and by distributing the available knowledge. Furthermore, because of the narrow focus of each team, there is also little interchange of tasks. By dynamically combining team efforts into the project that needs the most attention we would be able to deliver a higher peek performance. In short: we are going to combine resources, knowledge and half-products, that have been separated too long. Recently we started the introduction of Total Quality Management (TQM) in our organisation. The aim is to fully adapt our organisation following the principles of TQM. As a part of this process we have introduced the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) to evaluate our software engineering department. The goal is to discover our strengths and weaknesses according to this model and to set goals to strive for. Strengths • Strong sense of teamwork • Highly educated software engineers • Extensive knowledge of advanced algorithms • Basic Automated testing • Standard alpha / beta cycles for new software • Good use of version management software Weaknesses • Not enough reuse of software between project groups • No standard and explicit procedures for designing and developing software • Lack of training in newest software technologies • Too much dependence on knowledge of specific individuals • Lack of detailed and reliable planning • No standard knowledge base • Ad-hoc adaptation of software leading to excessive testing resources needed and lack of quality Currently, our organisation can be characterised as functioning in level 1 of the CMM framework, with some elements of higher levels. Our goal is to reach level 3 via level 2 in two years time. A first step of this process that is covered by this proposal is the extensive use of components in our software engineering process. The main actions to be taken are: • Review possibilities for breaking up current software in components • Review of further use of third-party components 11/05/1998 Page 6 of 19
  • 7. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 • Training of personnel in the building and usage of components • Setting of company-wide documentation system, including procedures for building and selecting components (`best-practices’) • Setting up a component repository facilitating reuse of components • Setting measurement system for quality and productivity • Incorporating component characteristics in planning methodology • Evaluation of progress made possible by component-based approach The management of our firm is fully committed to the implementation and application of procedures for improving our software engineering process. This is illustrated by the installation of employees in different roles guarding the quality of this process. A Quality Assurance manager with full authorisation is responsible for the quality of the entire process. A Repository Librarian is responsible for the quality and integrity of the components and the documentation in the component repository. 2.4 Definition of the Baseline Project The baseline project for this PIE project is the Active Web Search Assistance (AWSA) project. On request of a locally based search engine company –the operator of the eldest and most frequently used Dutch Internet search-engine site- (comparable to AltaVista, Yahoo, Excite etc., but specialised in Dutch sites), Sentient is engaged in a project to develop an advanced search agency system. Core features of the required functionality’s are 1) better understanding of user needs during consultation of search-services, involving context sensitive and adaptive interpretation of queries on the basis of user modelling; and 2) selective dissemination of information on the basis of user profiles and analysis of information content of documents. In our opinion this is an excellent project to be used for the experiment not only because this system, as most Web applications, needs to be built and be fully operational in a relatively short time frame, but moreover the system requires the integration of diverse functionality’s that have been developed at Sentient in largely separated software environments. Thus, the semantic or associative text search engine has been developed within the OMA environment; additional search functions, as well as analysis, clustering and profiling functions are available from DataDetective. Pires will contribute image processing functions (particularly automatic semantic indexing of image or multimedia objects) and ‘intelligent agent’ software is being developed within SUI.DM. It is characteristic for current system development projects at Sentient to involve diverse advanced functionality’s, but AWSA requires a wider range than most. 2.5 Definition of Experiment - in Context of the Baseline Project The focus of the experiment is to establish and test a well-defined component-based development organisation with emphasis on reuse, knowledge distribution and repeatability. The project management model will be adapted to incorporate reuse activities, resources and documentation, enabling the project management to plan and track the baseline project. Metrics will be selected and used to evaluate both the quality and productivity improvements. The improved development organisation will be applied to our baseline project, the development of new Web versions of our main product, the data-mining tool DataDetective. The following metrics will be sampled: • Lines of Code (LOC) • Hour expenditure • Discovered errors • Planning accuracy (days late compared to planned) These will provive measures for the following objectives: • Increased productivity • Increased correctness • Increased maintainability • Increased planning accuracy It should be stressed that this project goes much further than merely introducing some new development technology. It implies an important change in the way we work, towards a more controllable and measurable 11/05/1998 Page 7 of 19
  • 8. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 development organisation. Therefore we will invest much effort into educating and motivating our employees to change and start using the new procedures that may seem ‘bureaucratic’ or ‘ineffective' in the beginning. We will put emphasis on the fact that our developers can use their skills more efficiently, produce higher quality software and solve more interesting problems. Management will have to support the increasing high level complexity of development by supplying more training. The experiment serves as a practical framework to improve our development and business processes, both for our development team and our internal and external customers. To assure that an incremental and realistic approach is taken we constrain ourselves to reach maturity level 2 (CMM) for all our business processes by the end of the experiment. If the experiment turns out to be successful we will continue to implement level 3 procedures after this project (current planning is completion of level 3 in two years). 2.6 Anticipated Benefits and Commercial Impact The current enterprise needs new capabilities for developing software at a faster rate, with higher quality and at a lower cost. New software must integrate with existing software into a pervasive infrastructure used both internally and outside the organisation by its partners, customers, and suppliers. To meet these demands, software development practice is rapidly shifting to a new class of software creation: enterprise-wide component-based development. Increased productivity We expect an increase of productivity by 20%. Currently, our programmers produce 33 lines of code per hour. The goal is 40. The promise of component-based applications is to enable developers to "snap together" applications by mixing and matching prefabricated "plug&play" software components. Reusing components reduce the development-time simply because the software doesn’t have to be rewritten, reducing effort in design, implementation and testing. However, it would be unfair to give all the credit of reused code to the introduction of component-based development if normally one would reuse the code anyway. The advantage is not primarily reusability, although it is made easier. Components typically have a clear and documented interface to the outside world because they are designed for reuse. This results in faster utilisation than when simply reusing code. Because of the improved enterprise-wide co-operation knowledge is more widespread so time can be saved on doing research within development projects. A decrease in debugging time is expected because components are already stabilised. This item is closely related to software correctness. Adopting component-based development means that, next to reusing components, new generic components have to be introduced occasionally. It is important to note that introducing new functionality by the introduction of a new component takes more time than just coding the functionality. The component has to be generalised, or the generalisation has to be designed and planned to be performed later (although postponing generalisation is bad policy). Furthermore, the component has to be documented more extensively and because generic components are more critical (applicable to more than one project), extended testing has to be done. It is expected that software development activities initially will take more time because the organisation is in a learning phase. Increased correctness We expect a decrease of 30% in total discovered errors per line of code. At the moment there are 13.6 errors per 1,000 lines before delivery and 6 errors after. Goals are 9.5 and 4.2 By errors we mean any anomalies which may be discovered, both during development time and after delivery. Components that already have been tested and used in other products are presumably more reliable. Components are easier to test because there is a clear interface and a specification of their behaviour in the documentation. Because of better documentation and experience with the components, there is less chance for errors. 11/05/1998 Page 8 of 19
  • 9. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 Because of the improved enterprise-wide communication, knowledge about technology is more widespread, resulting in fewer errors. Increased usability The usability of our software is expected to improve, which means the skill required to learn the software will lower, time required to become efficient in use will shorten and productivity will increase. Using the same components in several of our products makes it easier for users to become efficient in a new product if they are already familiar with one or more of our other products. A components that already has been used in other products is presumably more adapted to user needs. Knowledge about good usability will be better available enterprise-wide. Better speed / memory figures Modern object broking software allows components to be distributed over resources, increasing the performance and reducing memory usage. Bottleneck components can be run on fast machines and dataserving components can be centralised. Increased Maintainability Maintainability is expected to increase by 30% in lines per hour for software functionality changes after delivery. On average, change development is done at a rate of 15 lines per hour. The goal is 19.5. Systems are easier to change because the architecture is clearer when component-based development has been used. Fewer bugs are introduced because of the clear separation of subsystems. Knowledge about components and methods of design and implementation are more widespread and standard, so system implementation and maintenance can be done by different people. Hence, planning is more flexible, reducing the total duration of change. Applications "age well" when built using components. The developer maintains and improves the application by replacing components. Swapping in a new component results in improved capability. Increased flexibility Because of the increased uniformity of team-member capacities, tasks can be assigned more flexibly, reducing total project duration. Consequently it is possible to focus the total development manpower to a single high-priority project. Increased planning accuracy We expect the real project duration not to differ more than 10% from the planned duration. At the moment our average project duration exceeds the planned duration by 25%. Planning accuracy will improve because of the reduced total efforts and shorter project duration. Dividing the product in components allow a planning per subsystem. In addition, planning is easier since there typically is experience in utilising the components from earlier development projects. The latter advantage will be increasingly applicable in time. Increased turnover We expect a gain in turnover because of improved quality, lower prices and extended functionality. The increased productivity will extend the functionality, allowing products to compete better. By lowering our prices we can reach other segments of the market. Lower costs Simply because of improved productivity our costs will decrease. However, extra investments have to be made to the organisation changes. It is expected that costs will be reduced after 2 years. See also ‘productivity’ in this section. Benefits for the wider European community. General benefits from the current project may be expected for European software engineering companies who, through dissemination of our experiences from this project (see 2.8) may be stimulated and helped in developing their own software production process in the direction of increased componentialisation. There may particularly be benefits for companies active in data mining, either as producers or as users, because the current project indirectly addresses one of the main bottlenecks in wide scale employment of data mining procedures. The most important areas where knowledge transferral is to be expected are: 11/05/1998 Page 9 of 19
  • 10. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 • The way the functionality has been componentialised. • The metrics used to measure the effectiveness towards our objectives In current endeavours for the development of data mining procedures and methodology, such as the Crisp.DM Esprit project, it has been recognised that successful data mining requires both a high degree of vertical specialisation (different techniques and methods for different application domains) and a high degree of horizontal integration within user organisations (different datastreams and different user tasks must be integrated within the data mining process). Currently, these requirements are both hindered by the rather monolithic nature of most data mining environments: dominant tools tend to be large and complex general purpose solutions that are used mainly by technically sophisticated analysts, and cannot be easily or flexibly embedded within a particular task environment for non-technical end users. We hope to be able to demonstrate in the long run that componentialisation of data mining functionality's is the critical factor in order to achieve, through vertical specialisation and horizontal integration, an open, extendable and flexible embedding of advanced functionality's in wide ranges of end user task-environments. 2.7 Measurement of Results Two ways of measuring variables need to be distinguished. Some variables will be measured in short intervals (every week or month) and others over a long period of time (6 months or longer). This is necessary since some variables, like “Number of error reports after delivery” can only be measured when (a part of) the application has been delivered. However variables like “Hour Expenditure” will be tracked and measured every week. Past experiences and results of user tests on the developed applications will be used in comparison to the test results from this experiment. These results can be used as a reference. Ø Hour expenditure will be measured weekly. This will give insight into the project progress. Planning can be adapted at an early stage. Ø Lines of code (LOC) will be counted monthly using configuration management software. Excluded from the measured activities are efforts that make components out of existing software. Lines of code is an appropriate measurement because development tools and coding style do not change. The productivity figure LOC / man-hour will be monitored against the objectives, in order to react quickly if objectives become out of reach. Productivity measurements (LOC and hours) have to be recorded separately for software changes after delivery, in order to measure maintainability The measurement MTTC (mean time to change) is used for this: time to analyse, design and implement changes in existing software, measured the same way as productivity: LOC / man-hour. Ø Error reports will be measured monthly by counting error-report forms from the test team plus all error entries in the developer-logs. After delivery, every error report from our users will be recorded in an error-report form during three months. By errors we mean any anomalies which may be discovered, including serious design flaws. Because the number of discovered errors decreases over time after delivery, a model has been adopted for calculating the total number of errors present in a delivered product. From relevant examples in literature and from our own experience 80% of all errors are discovered in the first three months of use. Hence the measurement can be based on the number of discovered errors in the first three months after delivery. Ø On a monthly basis, the measurements will be held against the project objectives in order to divide capacities between designing, coding, testing and debugging. Ø After the software is delivered the total duration and effort calculations will be held against the planned duration and effort to see if objectives have been met. Ø In the future, turnover and costs figures will be compared to earlier figures to see if turnover objectives are met. Because the enterprise is still relatively inexperienced with the new way of developing software, it is expected that benefits will be stronger in the future. 2.8 Transferability of Experience and Dissemination Activities 11/05/1998 Page 10 of 19
  • 11. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 "He who knows nothing, can learn nothing." This statement, famous in cognitive science, is known as the learn paradox. It goes both for humans and organisations. Any organisation that is not able to identify its best practices and learn from its mistakes will not escape the deadlock of the learn paradox and will therefore not mature. Even in SME’s, which of course have the advantage of being rather small, the situation can exist that knowledge is not shared throughout the organisation, but rather resides in the heads of a small number of experts. As argued in section 4, this one of our current problems. In this project we plan to put a lot of stress on disseminating practices and experiences. These activities can roughly be divided into two categories, internal and external dissemination. Internal dissemination We plan to develop a knowledge base to store several categories of information sources, including: • Descriptions of internal and external components (interfaces, known problems, requirements, version history) • Statistical and management info on components (e.g. cost: price, number of lines, number of hours invested, number of bug reports; revenues: number of times used; • Discussion forum Furthermore we will develop a software best practice guide and a course that will be part of the introductory training at Sentient Machine Research. Finally, apart from regular project meetings, we plan to schedule a number of presentations to be given to the management team, the board and two colloquia open to all employees of Sentient Machine research. External Dissemination Apart from internal benchmarking, external benchmarking will be part of our project. In order to get feedback from other companies we will present many results also outside our company. External dissemination will be achieved mainly through presentations at international conferences. Some of the platforms for this are: The Crisp.SIG workshops where Sentient already has been invited to present on methodological issues. The KDD conference, the leading international forum for data mining developments, where we intend to present a paper in 1999 on the relation between software componentialisation and the integrated use of data mining in organisations. Other possible presentation platforms include EMMSEC 1999 and BaanWorld 1999. In the table below presentations at KDD'99 and EMMSEC'99 are planned. An overview of relevant dissemination activities is given in the table below. With "project" we refer to members of the Soft Nuggets project, with 'users' we refer to employees that will be part of the new business and development process. Form 5.4: Schedule of Dissemination Activities2 Ref Activity Event Type Target audience Planned date D8-1 External Reporting - Mid Report ESSI community Feb-99 Term D8-2 External Reporting - Final Report ESSI community Nov-99 D8-3 Colloquia Presentations & discussion Internal: All employees June-98 & Dec-99 11/05/1998 Page 11 of 19
  • 12. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 D8-4 Forum Outlook Discussion Folder Internal: project, users Continuous D8-5 Newsflash E-mail Internal: project, users Bi - Monthly D8-6 Knowledge Base Outlook / Hypertext / Internal: project, users Continuous Database D8-7 Presentation at international KDD'9 Presentation Data Mining community Aug-99? workshop 9 D8-8 Presentation at international EMMS Presentation Software Methodology Sept-99? event EC'99 community D8-9 International Press Releases Document, Fax & WWW External Nov-99 11/05/1998 Page 12 of 19
  • 13. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 2.9 Phased Workplan Introduction The project is divided in four parts: Project Management and co-operation (WP-I and WP-7), Preparation (WP-II), Project and Experiment (WP-III/V) and Follow-Up (WP-VI). These parts follow each other in time except that WP-1 and WP-7 run throughout the entire project. Form 5.1: Schedule of deliverables Deliverable reference(1) Description of the deliverable (Title) Availability Responsible Planned date D1-1 - Report Project Planning (initial) I SMR Okt-98 D1-2 - Progress Report - 6 m R SMR Dec-98 D1-3 - Progress Report - 12 m R SMR Jun-99 D1-4 - Progress Report - final R SMR Dec-99 D1-5 - Cost statement R SMR Dec-99 D1-6 - Project Tracking Monthly management reports R SMR monthly D1-7 - Kick Off Meeting Kick-Off meeting I SMR Jun-99 D2-1 - Report CMM consultancy (external) R 3rd Party Jul-98 D2-2 - Report Definition of new processes &R SMR Aug-98 measurement D2-3 - Implementation Implementation of new processes & I SMR Okt-98 measurements D2-4 - Report - Component listing Identify Components (internal & external) R SMR Sept-98 D2-5 - Report Component Documentation I SMR Nov-98 D2-6 - Training Training by 3rd party I 3rd Party 2nd half of 98 D2-7 - Internal Training I SMR Summer 98 D5-1 - Report Measurements R SMR Aug-98 D5-2 - Report Project Documentation R SMR Sept-99 D6-1 - Report CMM consultancy (external) I 3rd Party Aug-99 D6-2 - Report Component Documentation I SMR Nov-99 D6-3 - Report Advanced Measurement & Interpretation R SMR Okt-99 D7-1 - Presentation(s) Co-operation with other ESSI projects R SMR Contiunous D8-1 - Mid Term report External Reporting - Mid Term R SMR Mar-99 11/05/1998 Page 13 of 19
  • 14. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 D8-2 - Final report External Reporting - Final R SMR Dec-99 D8-3 - Colloquia I SMR Jun-98 and Dec-99 D8-4 - Forum I SMR Contiunous D8-5 - Newsflash R SMR Contiunous D8-6 - Knowledge Base I SMR Contiunous D8-7 - Presentation (Aug 99) T8-10 - International Presentation P SMR Aug-99 D8-8 - Presentation (Sept 99) T8-11 - International Presentation P SMR Sept-99 D8-9 - Press releases P SMR Nov-99 Form 5.2: Resources allocated to workpackages related to deliverables Workpackage reference(1) Start date End date (2) Effort(3) Deliverable (2) (person- reference (4) days) WP-1 - Project management 1-6-98 1-12-99 47 T1-1 - Project Planning (initial) 1-9-98 15-10-98 5 D1-1 - Report T1-2 - Progress Report - 6 m 1-6-98 1-12-98 8 D1-2 - Progress Report - 6 m T1-3 - Progress Report - 12 m 1-12-98 1-6-99 8 D1-3 - Progress Report - 12 m T1-4 - Progress Report - final 1-6-99 1-12-99 8 D1-4 - Progress Report - final T1-5 - Report - Cost statement 1-11-99 1-12-99 6 D1-5 - Cost statement T1-6 - Project Tracking 1-6-99 1-12-99 10 D1-6 - Monthly management reports T1-7 - Kick Off Meeting 1-6-98 1-6-98 2 D1-7 - Kick Off Meeting WP-2 - SetUp Software Design Processes 1-6-98 1-12-98 200 T2-1 - CMM consultancy (external) 1-6-98 1-7-98 10 D2-1 - Report T2-2 - Definition of new processes & measurement 1-7-98 1-8-98 20 D2-2 - Report T2-3 - Implementation of new processes & measurements 1-8-98 1-10-98 40 D2-3 - Implementation T2-4 - Identify Components (internal & external) 1-7-98 1-9-98 45 D2-4 - Report - Component listing T2-5 - Component Documentation 1-9-98 1-11-98 25 D2-5 - Report T2-6 - Training by 3rd party 1-7-98 1-12-98 40 D2-6 - Training 11/05/1998 Page 14 of 19
  • 15. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 T2-7 - Internal Training 1-6-99 1-9-99 20 D2-7 - Internal Training WP-3 - Baseline Project Preparation (Not 1-9-98 1-2-99 0 Funded) T3-1 - Extract, generalize & code components 1-9-98 1-1-99 0 T3-2 - Test components 1-1-99 1-2-99 0 T3-3 - Requirement Specification Web Application 1-9-98 1-10-98 0 T3-4 - Software Specification Web Application 1-10-98 1-11-98 0 T3-5 - Coding prototype Web Application 1-11-98 1-2-99 0 WP-4 - Baseline Project (Not Funded) 1-2-99 1-8-99 0 T4-1 - Coding Web Application 1-2-99 1-5-99 0 T4-2 - Bugfixes 1-5-99 1-7-99 0 T4-3 - Software Test Web Application 1-7-99 15-7-99 0 T4-4 - Acceptance Test Web Application 15-7-99 1-8-99 0 WP-5 - Experiment 1-8-98 1-9-99 55 T5-1 - Measurements 1-10-98 1-8-99 35 D5-1 - Report T5-2 - Project Documentation 1-8-98 1-9-99 20 D5-2 - Report WP-6 - Follow Up 1-8-99 1-11-99 46 T6-1 - CMM consultancy (external) 1-8-99 15-8-99 6 D6-1 - Report T6-2 - Component Documentation 1-9-99 1-11-99 25 D6-2 - Report T6-3 - Advanced Measurement & Interpretation 1-9-99 1-10-99 15 D6-3 - Report WP-7 - Co-operation 1-6-98 1-12-99 15 T7-1 - Co-operation with other ESSI projects 1-6-98 1-12-99 15 D7-1 - Presentation(s) WP-8 - Dissemination 1-6-98 1-12-99 47 T8-1 - External Reporting - Mid Term 1-6-98 1-3-99 8 D8-1 - Mid Term report T8-2 - External Reporting - Final 1-3-99 1-12-99 12 D8-2 - Final report T8-3 - Colloquia 1-6-98 1-12-99 4 D8-3 - Colloquia T8-4 - Forum 1-6-98 1-12-99 1 D8-4 - Forum T8-5 - Newsflash 1-6-98 1-12-99 2 D8-5 - Newsflash T8-6 - Knowledge Base 1-6-98 1-12-99 2 D8-6 - Knowledge Base T8-7 - International Presentation 1-7-99 1-9-99 8 D8-7 - Presentation (Aug 99) T8-8 - International Presentation 1-8-99 1-10-99 8 D8-8 - Presentation (Sept 99) 11/05/1998 Page 15 of 19
  • 16. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 T8-9 - Press releases 1-11-99 1-12-99 2 D8-9 - Press releases total 410 WP-1 - Project management T1-1 - Project Planning (initial) The project planning of both baseline project and experiment needs to take into account both the newly developed processes and the overhead produced by the experiments. The project planning is a deliverable. T1-2 - Progress Report - 6 m T1-3 - Progress Report - 12 m T1-4 - Progress Report - final T1-5 - Report - Cost statement T1-6 - Project Tracking This task includes the delivery of monthly management reports T1-7 - Kick Off Meeting One day internal workshop for management WP-2 - Set up of component-based software design and development processes The main task here is to prepare the organisation for a change in practices, by informing and committing all people involved, through a series of meetings, workshop-sessions and seminars. New functions will be installed (Component Repository Librarian, Quality Assurance Manager). The latter will also be project leader for the PIE experiment. T2-1 - CMM consultancy (external) External consultancy will be solicited, in order to bring in expertise on the CMM approach and on component-based design methods. A report will be written as a deliverable. T2-2 - Definition of new processes & measurement A task group will design formal and operational guidelines for project planning and management and for measurements of effort and output. The deliverable is a report or ‘handbook’ containing development project guidelines and measurements. T2-3 - Implementation of new processes & measurements After formal company wide acceptance the project leader and task leaders involved in the baseline project incorporate the new processes in their task planning. T2-4 - Identify Components (internal & external) 11/05/1998 Page 16 of 19
  • 17. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 Requirements for re-usable software components are established, and candidate software modules and programs are identified, investigated and evaluated with respects to these requirements. This analysis is extended to a set of external components produced by third parties. T2-5 - Component Documentation Documentation guidelines for components are developed and a repository for software components (both internal and external is set up). An important part of the repository is formed by a knowledge base containing data on functions, features and limitations of components in the repository. This knowledge base is expected to play an important role in actively promoting re-use of components. Documentation guidelines are written as a deliverable. T2-6 - Training by 3rd party This refers to courses by 3rd parties relevant for this project, e.g. O-O analysis, O-O design,and Advanced design Patterns T2-7 - Internal Training Internal training by staff of the project WP-3 & 4 Baseline project preparation (not funded) and Baseline project (not funded). For description see II.5. WP-5 - Experiment The experiment serves to test the newly developed and implemented processes in a baseline project. T5-1 - Measurements Basic Measurements are made according to the descriptions in II.6; the are carefully organised and double checked. T5-2 - Project Documentation This includes all documentation (except project reporting) that does not necessarily derive from the experiment, but includes all documentation that is a consequence of following the new standards eg. component documentation and the like. WP-6 - Follow Up In the follow-up phase the focus lies on interpretation and dissemination of the experimental results and motivating and empowering employees and external parties to adopt the best elements of the methodological approach we followed during the baseline project. T6-1 - CMM consultancy (external) External consultancy will be solicited, in order to bring in expertise and objective judgement of the experimental results. A report will be written as a deliverable T6-2 - Component Documentation Component Documentation will be maintained: relevant experimental results and know-how will be added to the component repository knowledge base. The documentation will be written as a deliverable. 11/05/1998 Page 17 of 19
  • 18. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 T6-3 - Advanced Measurement & Interpretation Advanced Measurements will be made; a number of complex measures will be constructed and evaluated on the basis of the basic measurements made in the experiments WP-7 - Co-operation T7-1 - Co-operation with other ESSI projects This task runs through the entire period of the project WP-8 - Dissemination External and internal dissemination of results is at the heart of the project and will be in focus throughout the entire project. T8-1 - External Reporting - Mid Term Mid-term report half-way the project T8-2 - External Reporting - Final End-term report T8-3 - Colloquia Two internal colloquia to inform all employees about the project T8-4 - Forum Outlook Discussion Folder for internal use T8-5 - Newsflash Internal Email service to highlight results T8-6 - Knowledge Base Outlook / Hypertext / Database of documents, results etc. T8-7 - International Presentation T8-8 - International Presentation T8-9 - Press releases 11/05/1998 Page 18 of 19
  • 19. Esprit - ESSI : PIE Project Programme Project 27818 - NUGGETS - Version 3.0 2.12 Glossary of terms ADAM Adaptive Data Analysis Modules AWSA Active Web Search Assistance CMM Capability Maturity Model CRISP-DM CRoss Industry Standard Process for Data Mining EMMSEC European Multimedia, Microprocessor Systems and Electronic Commerce KDD Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining LOC Lines of code MTTC Mean Time to Change SMR Sentient Machine Research TQM Total Quality Management 11/05/1998 Page 19 of 19