IS 4220
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  • 1. KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL New Course (NOT General Education) I. Proposed Information Course Prefix and Number: _____________IS 4220_______ Course Title: ___________Advanced Databases___________________________ Credit Hours (format should be # - # - #): ____3-0-3_____ Prerequisites: ______________IS 2080: Data Management_______________ (Prerequisites are courses or requirements that non-negotiable and must be successfully completed by any student before enrolling in the course or program under consideration. Corequisites are courses that can be taken before or in the same semester as the course under consideration. Courses at the upper-division level will require lower-division competencies or prerequisites.) Course Description for the Catalog: Students will learn database development techniques including database, designer and developer. Databases are used to support decision making by detecting patterns, devising rules, identifying new decision alternatives and making predictions about the future. Students will learn how to build large databases using SQL to query the data, building forms and reports, managing Web-based applications, and create an integrated application. II. Justification for Course A. Explain assessment findings which led to course development. This course is required for students who are focusing on both business intelligence and internet systems tracks. B. Explain for Prerequisites: 1. What is the substance of content in each prerequisite that commands its inclusion as a prerequisite to the proposed course? Changes in the curriculum 2. What is the desired sequence of prerequisites? IS 2080: Data Management à IS 4220: Advanced Databases
  • 2. 3. What is the rationale for requiring the above sequence of prerequisites? The pre-requisite provides the fundamental database concepts. 4. How often are the required prerequisites offered? The pre-requisites will be offered twice a year. C. Give any other justification for the course. III. Additional Information A. Where does this course fit sequentially and philosophically within the program of study. It fits in the upper major elective courses. B. What efforts have been made to ensure that this course does not duplicate the content of other college courses with similar titles, purposes, or content? This course is replacing an existing course, CSIS 4310 C. Where will the course be located in the program (elective, required in Area F, required or elective for the major)? Indicate and justify its placement in the curriculum. Major Elective. D. How often will this course be offered? This course will be offered twice a year. E. All sections of the course will be taught with the understanding that the following apply: 1. Purpose of the Course The purpose of this course is to introduce students to advanced concepts in database. 2. Objectives of the Course The course objective is to present the leading data management techniques and their applications to real-world problems. Critical thinking required to strategize and plan technology-based solutions to business goals in data mining situation, ability to work in groups and development of oral and written presentation skills. 3. Course Content The following content will be covered by this course: 1. Advanced database development issues 2. Review of database analysis and design techniques: E-R modeling 3. Building data warehouses 4. SQL data manipulation and data definition
  • 3. 5. Using SQL queries to insert, update, delete and view data 6. Data preparation 7. Database normalization 8. Data mining primitives and languages 9. Physical database design for relational databases 10. Fundamentals of PL/SQL 11. Database security and administration, OLAP 12. System architectures 13. Web technology and DBMSs 14. Mining association rules in large databases 15. Semi-structured data and XML 16. Classification 17. Create and modify database tables 18. Prediction 19. Using forms builder 20. Creating custom forms 21. Cluster analysis 22. Creating database reports, Web-based reports 23. Mining complex types of data F. What instructional methodologies will be incorporated into the course to stimulate group process, writing skills, multiculturalism, and educational outcomes? This course discusses the theory and application of databases to build and manage very large databases. G. Outline the plan for continuous course assessment. What are the department, school, college, or professional standards which will be used for the assessment? How will it be determined that the course is current, meeting the educational needs of students and responsive to educational standards? How often will the course assessment be done by the department? Student evaluation at end of semester, regular evaluation by program curriculum committee, and annual Assurance of Learning evaluation. H. Enclose a course syllabus (optional format described at the end of this document) IV. Resources and Funding Required A. What resources will be redirected to accommodate this course? N/A B. Explain what items will cause additional cost to the department/school/college Personnel Computer Technology
  • 4. Library resources Equipment Space
  • 5. IS 4220: Advanced Databases Instructor: Solomon Negash Office Number: CL 3013 Office Hours: TBD Phone: 770-420-4312 Email snegash@kennesaw.edu Course Description: Students will learn database development techniques including database, designer and developer. Databases are used to support decision making by detecting patterns, devising rules, identifying new decision alternatives and making predictions about the future. Students will learn how to build large databases using SQL to query the data, building forms and reports, managing Web-based applications, and create an integrated application. Prerequisites: IS 2080: Data Management Textbooks: • Main text book: Connolly, T. and C. Begg. Database Systems, Fifth Edition, Addison Wesley, 2008. • Secondary text book: Morrison, Morrison, and Conrad. Guide to Oracle 10g. Course Technology, 2006. • Secondary text book: Dunham, Margaret H. Data Mining: Introductory and Advanced Topics. Prentice Hall. 2003. Learning Objectives: The course objective is to present the leading data management techniques and their applications to real-world problems. Critical thinking required to strategize and plan technology-based solutions to business goals in data mining situation, ability to work in groups and development of oral and written presentation skills.
  • 6. Learning Outcomes: As a result of completing this course, students will be able to: o Explain and apply database tools and techniques o Analyze and solve real business problems o Develop databases for data warehouse applications o Develop databases for data mining applications Course Project Students are required to work on a group course project that conducts different data mining tasks on a real business data by using SQL Server. Assignments Assignments will be questions related to each major topic covered in this course. Grading: The schedule and deliverables in this syllabus will change because we are working on a real project. A revised syllabus will be issued at the course midpoint. Assignment and participation 20% A 90% - 100% Midterm 1 15% B 80% - 89% Midterm 2 20% C 70% - 79% Team project 20% D 60% - 69% Final exam 25% Course Schedule (Tentative, subject to change): Date Topic Slides Advanced database development issues Review of database analysis and design techniques: E-R modeling Building data warehouses SQL data manipulation and data definition Using SQL queries to insert, update, delete and view data Data preparation Database normalization Data mining primitives and languages Physical database design for relational databases Fundamentals of PL/SQL Database security and administration, OLAP System architectures
  • 7. Web technology and DBMSs Mining association rules in large databases Semistructured data and XML Classification Create and modify database tables Prediction Using forms builder Creating custom forms Cluster analysis Creating database reports, Web-based reports Mining complex types of data Academic honesty statement Every KSU student is responsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code of Conduct, as published in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. Section II of the Student Code of Conduct addresses the University's policy on academic honesty, including provisions regarding plagiarism and cheating, unauthorized access to University materials, misrepresentation/falsification of University records or academic work, malicious removal, retention, or destruction of library materials, malicious/intentional misuse of computer facilities and/or services, and misuse of student identification cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct will be handled through the established procedures of the University Judiciary Program, which includes either an "informal" resolution by a faculty member, resulting in a grade adjustment, or a formal hearing procedure, which may subject a student to the Code of Conduct's minimum one semester suspension requirement. Students are encouraged to study together and to work together on class assignments and lab exercises; however, the provisions of the STUDENT CONDUCT REGULATIONS, II. Academic Honesty, KSC Undergraduate Catalog will be strictly enforced in this class. Frequently students will be provided with “take-home” exams or exercises. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they fully understand to what extent they may collaborate or discuss content with other students. No exam work may be performed with the assistance of others or outside material unless specifically instructed as permissible. If an exam or assignment is designated “no outside assistance” this includes, but is not limited to, peers, books, publications, the Internet and the WWW. If a student is instructed to provide citations for sources, proper use of citation support is expected. Additional information can be found at the American Psychology Association (APA) website: http://www.apa.org/journals/webref.html
  • 8. Acknowledgment and Acceptance of Academic Integrity Statement: In any academic community, certain standards and ethical behavior are required to ensure the unhindered pursuit of knowledge and the free exchange of ideas. Academic honesty means that you respect the right of other individuals to express their views and opinions, and that you, as a student, not engage in plagiarism, cheating, illegal access, misuse or destruction of college property, or falsification of college records or academic work. As a member of the Kennesaw State University academic community you are expected to adhere to these ethical standards. You are expected to read, understand and follow the code of conduct as outlined in the KSU graduate and undergraduate catalogs. You need to be aware that if you are found guilty of violating these standards you will be subject to certain penalties as outlined in the college judiciary procedures. These penalties include permanent expulsion from KSU. Read the Academic Integrity Statement and then sign and date in the space below. You are required to abide by these ethical standards while you are a student at KSU. Your signature indicates that you understand the ethical standards expected of you in this academic community, and that you understand the consequences of violating these standards. ________________________________ ________________________________ Course Name Instructor Name Print Name Student ID Number Signature Date ________________________________ email
  • 9. Attendance Policy Class attendance: Regular attendance is strongly recommended. If an emergency arises, contact professor prior to class time via email or phone. If you are absent for excusable emergency you have to bring proof to avoid academic penalty. For example, paper work indicating doctor’s visit. Make-up work*: Assignments; late assignments accrue 20% penalty for each late day. No late quizzes. No late project presentations. Exams; no make-up exams are given. If an emergency arises, and an absence is excused, then the student may take a cumulative final exam in its place. *Assignments, projects, and quizzes can be submitted anytime before the due date. Therefore, no emergency excuses are accepted. Reference/Bibliography N/A
  • 10. V. COURSE MASTER FORM This form will be completed by the requesting department and will be sent to the Office of the Registrar once the course has been approved by the Office of the President. The form is required for all new courses. DISCIPLINE: _Information Systems_____________________ COURSE NUMBER: ___IS 4220______________________ COURSE TITLE FOR LABEL: __Advanced Databases___________________ (Note: Limit 30 spaces) CLASS-LAB-CREDIT HOURS: __3-0-3__________ Approval, Effective Semester: __Summer 2008__________ Grades Allowed (Regular or S/U): __Regular___________ If course used to satisfy CPC, what areas? ___Major Elective_____________________________ Learning Support Programs courses which are required as prerequisites: ______IS 2080: Data Management_____ APPROVED: _______________________________________________________________________ Vice President for Academic Affairs or Designee
  • 11. KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL New Course (NOT General Education) Course Prefix and Number: __IS 4220___________________________ Responsible Department: ___Computer Science and Information Systems______ Proposed Effective Date: __Summer 2008__________________________ Signature Page Submitted by: ___Solomon Negash___ Date: Name 12/03/2007 ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ Department Curriculum Committee, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ General Education Council*, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ Professional Teacher Education Unit Program Area*, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ Department Chair, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ College/School Curriculum Committee AND/OR Teacher Education Council*, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ College/School Dean, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee, Date ___ Approved ___ Not Approved _____________________________ Dean of Undergraduate & University Studies, Date *For curriculum proposals involving General Education courses, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum Committee and the General Education Council. For Teacher Preparation proposals, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum Committee, the Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) Program Area Committee, the Teacher Education Council, and the College/School Curriculum Committee. Form updated December 2, 2004.