Digital customer growth: Engaging customers in digital channels

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Digital customer growth - a framework …

Digital customer growth - a framework
A business model based on customer experience
How to build a strong customer experience
Using digital transformation to build a customer centric organisation
Creating a roadmap for digital customer growth

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  • 1. IMAGE BY CHERRYGARCIA / FLICKRLEADING ANDENGAGINGCUSTOMERS DIGITAL CHANNELSIN - GROWING VALUE THROUGHPERSONALIZED EXPERIENCES This report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the client organisation without prior written approval from Avaus.TOM NICKELSTOM NICKELSWWW.AVAUS.FIWWW.AVAUS.FI
  • 2. digital Sales or revenue is the foundation upon which every business is built. All sales come from your customers.customer All companies face challenges of growing and growth retaining customers as interactions and relationships move to the digital space. The only way to differentiate and create value for your customers is by delivering a better customer experience than the competition. To do this, you must listen to customers and interact with them as individuals. Digitally. This requires many changes within the company: new services and distribution channels, new ways of organizing, better data management, new flexible technologies and new metrics.
  • 3. 1 Digital customer growth - a framework 2 A business model based on customer experience 3 How to build a strong customer experience Using digital transformation to build a customer4 centric organisation 5 Creating a roadmap for digital customer growth
  • 4. 4 We combine strategy, analytics and design with technology and outsourcing services.DRIVINGBUSINESS Focus areas: •  Digital transformation •  Customer growth •  Digital sales and B2B Lead management •  Business model & service innovation •  Business process efficiency
  • 5. SOME GREAT COMPANIES WE WORK WITH: 100 SPECIALISTS OFFICES IN HELSINKI, FINLAND AND WROCLAW, POLAND REVENUE 10+ MILLION € (2012)
  • 6. FOUNDATION 1Digital customer growth – a framework
  • 7. Customershavechangedforever
  • 8. Google, Amazon, Apple and Facebook set new standards for what consumers expect from companies
  • 9. But most old companies are stuck withtheir legacy Slow decision making Legacy IT systems Old distribution channels Wrong competencies Company politics Fear of cannibalization
  • 10. CREATING A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE BASES FOR DIFFERENTIATIONIt’s difficult to differentiate basedon price or product characteristics.It might work for a while, but UNIQUEusually competition catches up. PRODUCTHowever REALLY KNOWINGYOUR CUSTOMERS and servingthem based on their individualneeds will set you apart. COST ADVANTAGE CUSTOMER INTIMACY
  • 11. In the beginning- companies created the productWithout a good productcompanies are not in thegame. But the coreproduct has already sometime ago become just ahygiene factor forproducing a greatcustomer experience.
  • 12. THEN COMPANIES STARTED TO ATTACH A LIFESTYLE TO THEIR PRODUCTS BY INVESTING IN BRANDING. What does it say about me if I wear Nike or drink Coke?This report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may be Now there was a context forcirculated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the client the product, a context thatorganisation without prior written approval from Avaus. added some value to customers.
  • 13. ”We have these “We have theseproducts, where do customers, how canwe find customers we serve them whilefor them?” making a profit?”
  • 14. Shoes Clothes Sensors PRODUCT Apps DevicesNOW COMPANIES Set goals Find routesARE ADDING SERVICE Track activitiesMORE CONTEXTservices &THROUGHcontentIt becomes easier. Educational.Fun. Something to share withfriends. It multiplies the value of CONTENTthe product. Workouts Music Voice prompts Training tips COMMUNITY Sharing Events Challenge friends
  • 15. The nextbattle-fieldfor context- is the battle between ecosystemsCustomer needs are fragmenting. Atan increasing pace. No company alonein any product category can producesolutions that satisfy the range ofneeds now on the market.The ultimate way to add context toproducts is by opening up andallowing others to build upon yourproduct and make it suitable for awhole range of users and needs. Inmost businesses this war is juststarting.
  • 16. IF YOU CAN ADD SERVICES AND CONTENT TO LIGHT BULBS YOU CAN DO IT IN ANY BUSINESSThis report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may becirculated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the clientorganisation without prior written approval from Avaus.
  • 17. CONTEXT TIME PREVIOUS BEHAVIOR LOCATION THE HEART OF CUSTOMER LIFECYCLE CUSTOMER INTIMACY IS NEEDS ANDMOTIVATIONS = RELEVANCEPREFERENCES HABITS LIFESTAGE ATTITUDE
  • 18. 1BUSINESS Customer Loyalty SalesMODEL experienceGrow sales andprofitabilityper customer RELEVANCE 2RELEVANTCUSTOMER Identify Listen Customize InteractENGAGEMENTTreat each customer asan individual 3 Data & informationORGANISATIONALCAPABILITIES Experience designMove from productcentric to customer Organisation & processescentric organisation Technology
  • 19. BUSINESS 2A business model basedon customer experience
  • 20. Customer Customer Salesexperience loyalty Customer Useful Recommends Customers growth Easy Buys more Revenue per customer Pleasant Will not switch Retention The business logic of customer growth
  • 21. 1 000 000 Customers X 20€ Average X 6 Purchases = 120 mil. € purchase per year Aktiivisten Keskiostos Ostouseus asiakkaiden määrä
  • 22. Segmenting customers based on purchase frequency 4. Passive 1. Sporadic 2. Regulars customers 3. Best customers Purchasefrequency per year 1 5 18 0
  • 23. How much revenue and profits do different segments bring? 1. Sporadic 2. Regulars 3. Best 4. PassivesFrequency 1 5 18 0Customers 400k 400k 200k 600kAvg purchase 20€ 20€ 20€ 20€Sales 8 m€ 40 m€ 72 m€ - Total revenue from all customer segments 120 m€
  • 24. What is the best way to grow sales? 1. Sporadic 2. Regulars 3. Best 4. PassivesFrequency 1 5 18 0Growth infrequency 1 5,5 20 0 132 m€ Sales Total growth 12 m€ = 10%
  • 25. …Customers Purchases Loyalty All Store Internet TelesalesCUSTOMER BASE - FEBRUARY 2012•  Total number of customers: 852030•  Marketing permissions: 754044 (88%)•  New customers this month: 5713•  Average purchases per customer: 2,3 12 MONTH TREND Existing customers New customers Revenue per customer Products per customer Share-of-wallet Customer life time value
  • 26. ENGAGEMENT 3How to build a strongcustomer experience
  • 27. Step 1Identifying customers
  • 28. UNIDENTIFIEDIDENTIFIED
  • 29. HOW DO WE IDENTIFYTHE CUSTOMER?
  • 30. THECHALLENGE: IS NOT REALLY METHIS IS WHAT YOU SEE, BUT ITA LOT OF THE CUSTOMER INFORMATIONCOMPANIES CURRENTLY USE ISN’T REALLY FOCUSEDON GETTING TO KNOW WHO THEY ARE AND WHATTHEY NEED. AND ABOVE ALL IT DOESN’T TELL MUCH ABOUTWHAT THE SITUATION – THE CONTEXT – OF THECUSTOMER IS RIGHT NOW.
  • 31. THE HEART OF CUSTOMER Products/INTIMACY IS services in useRELEVANCE Customer lifecycle Purchase history IS HELP FROM THIS COMPANY RELEVANT IN THE NEAR FUTURE? Contact DAYS TO history MONTHS Web searches RELATIONSHIP IS THIS SOMETHING I NEED RIGHT NOW? CONTEXTREAL-TIME Visit to webpage Purchase IMMEDIATE CONTEXT Expressed PERSONAL needs Call to CC CONTEXT Area of Weather residence Location Preferences YEARS Lifestage IS THIS IMPORTANT Attitudes TO ME IN LIFE? Social connections
  • 32. understanding context + CUSTOMER REAL-TIME PROFILE DATA BEHAVIORAL DATA Contextual marketing is about understanding not just who someone is but where they are, what they are doing, and what they are likely to do next. It’s about combining the right information about a customer and the context to deliver the right services and communication at the precise moment it offers the most value.
  • 33. INVEST IN DATA 0010011001010011101001100100011001100111001100011001100101001001100101001110100110010001100110011100110001 00101001001100101001110100110010001100110011100110001 Good data is like the ears of a sales man. Without it you100101001001100101001110100110010001100110011100110001 have no clue what the customer needs. Integrate traditional customer profile data with real-time behavioral data from all channels in order to UNDERSTAND the need and REACT to the context .
  • 34. Step 2Deepen customer insight
  • 35. MARKET VALUE NEED CONTEXTIN WHICH MARKET HOW CAN WE GROW WHAT SHOULD WE HOW SHOULD WE TREAT ASHOULD WE INVEST? LIFETIME VALUE? OFFER? SPECIFIC CUSTOMER? SEGMENTING ON A MARKET SEGMENTING BASED ON SEGMENTING BASED ON SEGMENTING BASED ONLEVEL. FOR INSTANCE CUSTOMER VALUE. FOR DIFFERING ATTITUDES THE SITUATION OF THECORPORATE CUSTOMERS VS INSTANCE HIGH-VALUE, AND NEEDS. FOR CUSTOMER. FOR INSTANCECONSUMERS. CHURN-RISK VS UNPROFITABLE INSTANCE TASTE, VISITED WEB-SITE, ORDERED CUSTOMERS. CONVENIENCE, OR COST. SPECIFIC PRODUCT OR IS AT LOCATION X. Different approaches customer insight
  • 36. THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO IDENTIFY CUSTOMERCONTEXTS – USING ONLY ONE IS NOT ENOUGH BUSINESS NEED Personalisation / Value Proposition Targeting management development CONTEXTUAL INDICATOR RECOMMENDATION ENGINE TRANSACTIONAL / VALUE BEHAVIORAL PROPENSITIES DEMOGRAPHICS / GEOGRAPHY LIFECYCLE ATTITUDINAL NEEDS Useful Sometimes useful Not useful on its own
  • 37. Segmenting customers based on value Most valuable customers: Retain Most growable customers: Grow Marginal customers: Business as usual Unprofitable customers: Dismiss or lower cost Cost to serve Customer value segments Current value Potential valueImage: Peppers & Rogers group
  • 38. behavior Segmentingcustomers based on
  • 39. PROPENSITY WHICH CUSTOMERS ARE LIKELY TO BUY SOMETHING, LEAVE OR DO OTHER SIGNIFICANT THINGS? THROUGH PREDICTIVE MODELLING TARGETING CAN BE MADE MORE EFFICIENT. THIS HAS A POSITIVE EFFECT ON BOTH THE BOTTOM LINE AND ON THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE.
  • 40. Developing customer STRATEGIES CUSTOMER ISSUEBUSINESS CHALLENGE with reasons to stay Understand me and provide me ion)Retain high value customers act g. Loyalty recognition, Next best (e. purchase more Provide me compelling reason to rs, Remarketing)Broaden the relationship ge g. Next best action, Behavioral trig (e. t, competitive offers Understand me and make relevanMatching customer type)Acquire the right customer , risk (e.g. Exclude high defectors, DebtImprove margin of Can I be satisfied with less to self-service, Raise prices) (e.g. Identify, Communicate, Steerunprofitable custmers
  • 41. ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE ON CUSTOMER VALUEENGAGEMENT Interactions € € € € CUSTOMER VALUE Money spent
  • 42. Step 3Customize your offering and communication
  • 43. Different needs and motives drive the development of customer offeringsAtoB Status Convenience Lifestyle Green values”I need a car to get ”I have money and ”I need to be able ”The car goes along ”I appreciatefrom one place to power, and I want to to trust my car. It with my lifestyle. I have ecological values.another” show it to others. always functions the my own personality My car does not Everybody admires way I wish.” and I want to pollute the nature.” my car.” experience it through my car.”
  • 44. Managing lifecycle Prospect > New customer > Developing Stabilized Good customer > Recommending customer > customer > customer > Newsletters Renewing contracts Rewarding, Recommending program Ensuring satisfaction Activation of service consideration use Communication Triggered added sales Service messages Resigning Analytics based Passivity… actions Targeted Saving the customer campaigns relationship Guidelines on how to use Tempting the customer products and services back manualPotential customer Welcome program Passivity scenario Churn…Recognizing interested automaticcustomers triggered Abandoning shopping Strengthening the Customer basket Up-sell and service Strengthening Customer acquisition > Welcome > cross-sell > experience> loyalty > recommends >
  • 45. TIMING HAS A BIG EFFECT ON RELEVANCEWHEN? Knowing when a product or service is relevantto the customer is one of the hardest things to do. But one that potentially pays of big time. Identifying the right customer behavior that SIGNALS THE MOST PRESSING CUSTOMER NEEDS and triggering communication based on that may increase relevance and sales SIGNIFICANTLY.
  • 46. FOCUS SALES EFFORTS ON THOSE THAT ARE READY TO BUY The different situations of customers and prospects should be recognized. Some are just doing initial browsing, while others are seriously thinking about buying. To optimize sales results we need to distinguish between customers in different phases of the buying cycle. Automated lead nurturing programs can be used for customers that are not quite ready yet. That allows us to focus scarce sales resources on customers most likely to buy. Image: www.smallbizwithkids.com
  • 47. Scoring leads in order to find customers that are ready to buy ”Lead scoring is a sales and marketing methodology for ranking leads in order to determine their sales-readiness. You score leads based on the interest they show in your business, their current place in the buying cycle and their fit in regards to your business.”Image: Marketo – The definitive guide to lead scoring
  • 48. SIMPLE REACTIONS TO CUSTOMER ACTION WILL MAKE THE CUSTOMER FEEL THATYOU RECOGNIZE HIM – IT HAS A CLEAR FEEL-GOOD FACTOR TO IT. (and it affects sales)
  • 49. Example of Dialogue Model: New membersBusiness goals / aim Description: Rules:•  Activate customer •  After joining the customer is encouraged to •  Trigger valid for all new members that have•  Ensure customer satisfaction utilize her membership not yet used their card •  Also strive to gain more customer knowledge •  Once the card is used, the goal of the through updated profile communication flow is met and this flow isCustomer experience ended•  ”I get benefits from” •  Updating or changing profile information is a•  ”Great offers and benefits” added sales trigger •  Communication will also be stopped if the•  ”Let´s check out the newest products” customer does not activate within 360 days •  Product offerings should include only products that are not often updated
  • 50. PERSONALIZE MAKE COMMUNICATION MORE RELEVANT BY ADAPTING IT TO THE NEEDS AND CONTEXT OF THE INDIVIDUAL CUSTOMER.
  • 51. NEW SERVICES NEW PLAYERS FOCUSING ON ADDING VALUE TO THE CUSTOMER CONTEXT ENTER OLD MARKETS. +”runtastic Roadbike is your comprehensive bike app for yoursmartphone. The integration of heart rate, cadence, andspeed sensors lets you get more precise tracking and analysisof your biking”
  • 52. my network THIS IS What value can it bring to products and services I use? How can companies facilitate that value?
  • 53. REMARKETING RELEVANCE TAKING REALTIME RELEVANCE ONE STEP FURTHER - KEEPING UP WITH THE CUSTOMER CONTEXT ONLINE Company User leaves website Popular sites Web user CLICK User returns”Remarketing is a feature that lets you reach people who have previously visited your site, and show them relevant ads when they visit other sites.” - Google
  • 54. MOBILIZE.
  • 55. ”The world’s finest department store brings the greatestinternational brands to iPhone. In-store, navigate your way around 4,000 of the world’s mostpremium brands over 1million square feet and 7 floors.”
  • 56. CHANGE MANAGEMENT 4 Using digitaltransformation to build a customer centric organisation
  • 57. Capability 1Customer centric leadership
  • 58. ”Newswe ek has announce that it is g d oing DIGITAL ONLY bringing an end to magazine the ’s 79 year history in print.”
  • 59. What is at stake? Successful vsunsuccessful change After iPhone changed the game Samsung was able to convert its portfolio to smartphones while Nokia failed to do so. Market demand can steer you in any number of directions, but a vision of a future should provide the compass for making the big bets.
  • 60. Nokia’s firstboldmoveProbably the most importantstrategic change in Nokiashistory was made in 1992, whenthe new CEO Jorma Ollilamade a crucial strategicdecision to concentrate solelyon telecommunications.
  • 61. Will Nokia’snext moveever payoff?
  • 62. Google: we created Android to stop anApple-dominated future "If we did not act, we faced a draconian future where one man, one phone, one carrier was thefuture," he said. "Thats a future we dont want.”
  • 63. Four dimensions ofmanaging digitalcustomer growth 1. Managing Are you actively developing and delivering consistent positive Customer Experience customer experiennces in all channels? 2. Managing Do you have an accurate view of customer needs and Customer Insight behaviour that is based on data and facts? 3. Managing Do you know the value individual customers bring and are Customer Lifetime Value there systematic programs in place to increase that value? 4. Managing Are all employees committed and motivated to create value toCustomer Centric Culture customers and serve them based on their individual needs?
  • 64. Capability 2Data quality
  • 65. The volume of In 2002 digital data surpassed information non-digital for the first time. By is growing 2007 94% of all information on exponentially the planet was digital.
  • 66. All companies are now in theinformation businessMake existing products and services more valuable to your customers by building inmore data and information. In B2B this is obvious. Sharing data is a key way for addingvalue to products and services. But it applies to B2C as well. Apps for smart phones.GPS for cars. Smart TVs. Recipies on food packages.
  • 67. Information drives a superior customerexperience Amazon is the grand master of using customer insight to improve the customer experience. And results are impressive. Amazon is the most recommended company* with 82% of customers saying they would recommend it.*Source: Temkin Group Q1 2011 ConsumerExperience Survey
  • 68. IF SOMEONE CAN REINVENT THE LIGHT CUSTOMER EXPERIUENCE OF A BULBTHE ANYTHING CAN BE REINVENTEDThis report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may becirculated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the clientorganisation without prior written approval from Avaus.
  • 69. Information drives value old 10-f price m iuprem PHILIPS HUE VS. GENERIC LED BULB 59,95 € 5,95 € Philips Hue is a great example of a product where information information adds context to product usage. Contexts adds customer value. By increasing customer value Philips can charge a price premium for a product that otherwise would be generic. Information thus has become a key driver for profitability.
  • 70. GeckoboardReal-time information has become one of the most valuable management toolsaround. We need to know what is happening right now – are customer buying, arecompetitors responding, are we making profits – in order to make smart decisions.
  • 71. management Data Managing data Data collection Data cleansing Data enrichment Data security Data usagerepository 360 degree Using data to Data view of drive insight and customer Marketing interactions database Data sources Inbound Campaigns and External Demographics Purchase history Web history contacts responses datasources
  • 72. Capability 3Customer experience design
  • 73. CREATE BIG EMOTIONS “ Ive learned that people will forget what you said, Apple. Zappos. Net-a-Porter. people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. ” Maya Angelou, american poet 76 avaus.fi website
  • 74. simplicity drives convenienceconvenience drives value value drives profits
  • 75. THEHOMEBUTTON
  • 76. ”Being simple isn’t as simple as it used to be. IKEA isgrowing, and growing fast. Today, it takes strategy to be simple, but it must be that way. It can be hard to find simple in a complicated world but it is the IKEA way.” Hansi, Ikea employee on Ikea.com
  • 77. Nowadays, customers don’t want justfunction. They want pleasure — goodproducts that are aesthetically appealing.
  • 78. Starbucks is to the age of aesthetics what McDonald’s was to the age of convenience.Image: homedsgn.com
  • 79. AESTETHICS DRIVES DESIGN OF PHYSICAL PRODUCTSThis report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may becirculated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the clientorganisation without prior written approval from Avaus.
  • 80. BUT AESTETHICS IS AS IMPORTANT IN DIGITALSERVICES
  • 81. MAPPING THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY WILL HELP TODEVELOP THE SERVICE EXPERIENCE IN MORE DETAIL
  • 82. Capability 4Customer centric organisation and processes
  • 83. continuous Introducing digital activities should not be seen as an individual project Digital is a continuous process… …bringing new ways of working, communicating and marketing, serving customers process
  • 84. Digital first Change your mindset for marketing to ”digital first”. Calculate the ROI for marketing. Digital channels are (almost) always more efficient than traditional channels.
  • 85. Inspire peopleTerry Leahy set an inspiring vision for Tesco’s entire staff: ” Give people a purpose, give them1) Become the leader in grocery retail 2) Create a new concept big exciting things to do.”for consumer goods retail 3) Go international. All of them came Sir Terry Leahy, former CEO of Tescotrue.
  • 86. Marketing & All marketing activities should be connected to sales.sales as one Sales data tells you what your customers value. It will show you what works and what doesn’t, and which marketing investments are worth making.AWARENESS All Names Recycled Prospect Engaged Sales Lead Lead Opportunity Customer & Collaboration with sales Marketing Sales
  • 87. crawl – walk – runBecoming a digitally transformed organization or function doesnot happen over night. Change happens step by step.Start with the basics, like managing data and communicating indigital channels. Connecting web data from the customerinterface with your own data assets, and using that insight forbusiness decisions comes after a year or two.
  • 88. Capability 5Flexible technology platform
  • 89. REACT INREAL-TIMERELEVANT TIMELY INTERACTIONS ARE POSSIBLE ON A GRANDSCALE ONLY THROUGH AUTOMATING PROCESSES.
  • 90. Example: technical architecture
  • 91. Capability 6Customer centric culture
  • 92. Change isfundamentallyabout people
  • 93. CULTUREDRIVESTHE MOSTINNOVATIVECOMPANIESFORWARDNOT STRATEGY
  • 94. market for I think there is a world“ puters.”may be five comThomas J. Watson Sr., then-president of IBM, made an apparentmisjudgment of the PC market’s potential. Under Watson’s leadership, IBM — which invented the PC — didn’thave a vision as to how big the market could become and let others,especially Microsoft, get the lion’s share of the value creation.
  • 95. DIGITALISATION CAUSES SPEED OF THE CHANGE TO ACCELERATE VOLUME AND DISTRIBUTION OF INFORMATION driven by digitalisation MORE INFORMATION = FASTER CHANGEThis report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may be SPEED OFcirculated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the client CHANGEorganisation without prior written approval from Avaus.
  • 96. industrydynamics may change almost over night
  • 97. Are you ready for game changers being introduced in your industry?This report is solely for the use of client personnel. No part of it may becirculated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the clientorganisation without prior written approval from Avaus.
  • 98. Make mistakes- success comes from learning,learning comes from trial and errorMistakes are a requirement for learning. They will point you in the rightdirection. Organizations where people are punished for mistakes will lead to fightened organizations. Fear makes people passive. The biggest success stories include a lot of sidesteps that later proved to bemistakes. But which all had their part in pointing those companies in the rightdirection.
  • 99. The path towards customer centric culture
  • 100. ROADMAP 5Creating a roadmap fordigital customer growth
  • 101. Strategy and hands-on execution in parallell DATA CUSTOMER CUSTOMER CREATIVE STRATEGY MANAGEMENT INSIGHT STRATEGY DESIGNStrategic CHANGE MANAGE- REPOR- MENTdesign AUDIT CONCEPT TING & ANALYSIS DESIGN Vision Roll-out Optimize CONTENT PRODUC- DATAHands-on PLAN PILOT IT ARCHI- TION MANAGE- MENT TECTUREexecution EMPLOYEE CAMPAIGN EXECUTE AND ENGAGEMENT & TECHNICAL MANAGE- TECHNOLOGY EVALUATE TRAINING DEPLOYMENT MENT SERVICES PILOT CROSS COMPETENCE TEAMS STRATEGY DESIGN TECHNOLOGY ANALYTICS PROCESS MGMT
  • 102. Defining customer strategy Why? Who? Vision and Customer definitions andCustomer insight objectives, KPI’s selections, Customer lifecycle What? How? Moments of truth, Offering, Culture, Business Piloting and Service channels processes, Development implementation areas and roadmap
  • 103. Example: Digital transformation program Three year roadmap for Digital Customer Growth 2012 2013 20141. Data andtechnology Key data management New website Online sales development2. Customerdialogue Production of Mobile services digital contents Online customer service3. Customer As is Resource and channel analysisprocesses Process automatisation optimization4. Service Development of new digital servicesinnovations Direct customer dialog Knowledge5. Organisation management New working methodsand culture New job descriptions and 10 avaus.fi website organization
  • 104. The winners are thoseorganisations that canlearn new things andunlearn old things at anever increasing speed.
  • 105. Thank you! Tom Nickels Senior advisor / Avaus Consulting+358 40 5443348 / tom.nickels@avaus.fi