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  • Some basic definitions to introduce the focus of the session – with reference to the session abstract.
  • Paisley 2001-02 to 2007-08:15-point modules and the vehicle for level 7 PDP was the module “Technical Communication & Personal Development”. It was presented in trimester 1 to all Science and Engineering students, and Computing students in some sessions. The assessed components were: Personal Development Plan, Written Report, Oral Presentation, EXCEL exercise. It addressed both PDP and IT skills.The main problem we found was that it was presented separately from subject content and so many students did not see the relevance to their subject studies. Partly this was due to the very wide constituency of students on the module. 2010-11 to 2012-13:The module “Scientific Investigation” includes ePortfolios and other elements, such as a poster presentation, in a scientific context. At Paisley this module is presented in trimester 2. In order to prepare the ground, further sessions are presented in trimester 1 covering Introduction to PDP, ePortfolios, Academic Writing, Library Skills and “What Next? – summary of what had been learned/covered. In the first two years (10-11 & 11-12) these further sessions were presented as “extras”, timetabled on a day where the students did not have other classes. In feedback, although students said that they appreciated these classes, attendance was disappointing and a significant number said there needed to be more of an explicit connection with their studies.
  • Large cohort of students – around 250 students in first year science – approx 220 of these on cells and molecules module. Challenge was to embed PDP as a learning process – not to just tell students about it. To make it meaningful it has to be embedded as a learning process and made relevant to the student in the context of their learning in their subject area.
  • In response12-13 PDP sessions taught as part of Cells & Molecules timetable (taken by virtually all the first year Science students)embedded directly into important assessments within this module. To encourage students to view PDP elements as a learning process directly relevant to their subject learning. Focused on essay writing as a process to provide links with the process of Personal development/development of graduate attributes.2012-13 – Scientific investigation – Writing the group case study – sessions covered group work/academic writing/literature searching (all related to specific assessment). Preparing an academic poster session (referring to referencing etc. ) Session on e-portfolio construction and reflective writing. Linked to information covered in trimester 1 (built on approaches already taught – refer to example). 
  • In Effective Learning we work from a theoretical base that is rooted in students’ experience of writing at University, and our approach to curriculum development is informed by what we learn from our work with individual students: student centred – links to focus on the student experience. Writing as social practice Academic literacies theory views literacies, in this case writing, as social practice. Different ‘literacies’ (or ways of writing) associated with different contexts, and related to what counts as ‘knowledge’ in those contexts – so for instance different ways of writing in different subject areas, depending on how knowledge is constructed in that subject area.  Academic knowledge is constructed and communicated through writing, and learning is assessed through writing and so writing should form a central part of the student learning process.  Students experience academic writing activity in the context of their wider life and educational experience. Writing in HE is where students engage in deep learning and understanding of subject content and is a potentially transformative learning process, rather than being about the acquisition of surface skills.  Learning and writing in HE requires students to adapt to new ways of knowing and understanding – a different, more critical approach to knowledge - and students also need to learn how to write in a new and unfamiliar way.  Students who have not encountered this learning/writing approach before often find it to be a frustrating, confusing and emotive experience. They don’t feel they have the level of knowledge or authority required to write in that way....and are challenged by aspects such as expressing an opinion when using ‘third person’ writing style.  Also – different types of writing in different subject disciples, and within those disciplines – so report, essay, reflective writing and poster all different types of writing – so a different approach should be taken to produce a different product.  Teaching in HE tends to focus on the finished ‘product’ without focusing on the process of creating that productEncourages students to copy and engage in ‘fake writing’ - using specialist terminology and imitating academic style, without understanding it - and often missing the key substantive elements that should be included (even though they know them). Writing becomes a ‘barrier’ to learning. Writing as usefully problematic; writing to learn and learning to writeIssues highlighted through the individual feedback were collated and discussed in a follow up class session and the class were asked to write a ‘draft introduction’ to their essay in groups, putting into practice some of what they had learned from the initial formative activity. This illuminates what is usually a hidden and private process – becomes a ‘usefully problematic’ process - encouraging peer learning - bridges the gap between teaching, learning and assessment, and allows for a clear and shared understanding of assessment criteria and the feedback process.Identified key blocks to learning to write in this way, and to support learning and also to adapt the guidelines to clarify areas that hadn’t been clearly expressed.
  • The sessions delivered with in the first year group – Introduction to PDP introduced the key concepts related to PDP and ePortfolio, which were then picked up again in Semester 2 in the Scientific Investigation module.A ‘Generic’ Academic writing session was delivered as a lecture and then followed up by the tutorial session which focused on the particular assignment – deconstruction of the question and discussion of ‘appropriate’ writing using the text type activity (Tied in with approach of Purpose, Audience, Structure, Language, Information and Evidence) . Positive student feedback received on this session in terms of ‘demystifying’ writing.Introduction of ‘literacies’ – different forms of writing suitable for different audiences, purposes etc (refer to hand-out). These sessions also linked explicitly with Lucy’s sessions on finding and using information and evidence and referencing.
  • The policy drivers – part of the landscape that we have to engage with – we have taken them and embedded them as students’ learning processes - that underpinned our work were centred on embedding Personal Development Planning, with reference to how PDP related with, and could be facilitated through a focus on the development of Graduate Attributes, employability (related to a subject/programme specific context) and module learning outcomes. Articulating these frameworks with subject specific task/assessment/student learning – more directly linked to learning activity so that students can see the relevance of them to learning on their modules in additional to their on-going development as a science graduate in a particular field.The intention was to increase engagement and interest in this way by highlighting the immediate and longer term benefit and value gained from engaging in PDP, by articulating it with a subject specific assessment task (delivered as embedded in the module) – long term development (in terms of ‘end of graduation’ benefits) and immediate value (in terms of improving learning and attainment). I believe that Alison and Robin have found a really important way to ‘embed’ the development of PDP i.e. by the academic setting a subject related task that students will seek to do well to earn marks, so they are given the ‘benefit’ of some generic skill training, for which they can immediately see the ‘value’ . This means that they DO engage well with the opportunity and everyone succeeds in enhancing the learning! In effect, we have a mechanism that means that students DO get marks for doing their ‘PDP’ work (this overcomes the one reason everyone suggests that students don’t engage with the PDP training i.e. because they are not given ‘marks’).
  • On the basis of this approach we have developed a model which we believe can be adapted for use in any subject area to achieve similar results – a student centred model which takes the student experience of learning as it’s starting point. The student is focused on, and aware of, the assessment tasks they have to carry out. The wider ‘frameworks’ are not immediately visible or relevant to the student, so we felt it was important to link our introduction of them into the assessment tasks to foster student engagement with them. If we can make the learning frameworks relevant to and have a positive impact on the student’s assessment tasks – which are their ‘primary concern’ - then they are more likely to engage with them, and learning and development will be enhanced.
  • So – if we take the cells and molecules essay as an example (and Robing will talk about this some more in a minute). Through the sessions we delivered (refer to hand-outs) we highlighted the importance of essay writing in developing students’ attributes and skills in relation to the graduate attributes they were developing (there were several – concerned with information literacy and academic literacy) by linking them directly an explicitly with learning outcomes, graduate attributes and HEA employability profile statements. Teaching was delivered with these being linked in as the underpinning context or reasoning behind the learning – students were learning how to write academically – like a scientist – and developing an understanding of their subject area through the writing process. (Refer to the session on deconstructing a question and the text type activity)
  • So – if we take the cells and molecules essay as an example (and Robing will talk about this some more in a minute). Through the sessions we delivered (refer to hand-outs) we highlighted the importance of the process of writing/learning in relation to developing students’ subject knowledge and to the development of their attributes and skills (there were several – concerned with information literacy and academic literacy) by linking them directly an explicitly with learning outcomes, graduate attributes and HEA employability profile statements. Teaching was delivered with these being linked in as the underpinning context or reasoning behind the learning – students were learning how to write academically – like a scientist – and developing an understanding of their subject area through the writing process. (Refer to the session on deconstructing a question and the text type activity)
  • In the second trimester (Scientific Investigation) we then supported the student to write reflectively about their learning experience (of writing the essay) encouraging them to use the Learning frameworks as a guide (refer to example in the Scientific investigation session re using the language from the HEA employability profile)
  • 1st module studied in the degree programmeScientific investigation : From my point of view the Module was definitely improved upon this year, which was exemplified in a better pass mark with an increase in cohort size. The numbers don’t lie….!! In terms of what was reason for this improvement was – I’m not completely sure. I think we should watch the module over the next few sessions to get a clearer outlook.  For PDP we saw an increase in average mark (from 35 % to 62 %) and for the poster session an increase (from 59 % to 79 %). The remaining assessed components were largely left unchanged from 2011-12. I think that the improvements can be rationalised by a number of factors. Implementation of the University attendance policy significantly improved results by removing non-engaging students. The input from Effective Learning had clear benefits, particularly in defining and supporting the PDP elements. The additional postgraduate support was also helpful in supporting the student cohort through the year. The improvements to the poster assessment are difficult to quantify directly between 2011-12 and 2012-13 as the assessment had changed and the new format was in my opinion more engaging and interesting for the students. From student feedback (observed in the ePortfolio) the module seemed to be widely appreciated by students, who were enthusiastic about the diversity of material being studied and in the support they were provided.Wider impact – feeding back into development of curriculum re reading list development/assessment guidance and brief/marking rubric/standardised approach ie to referencing across modules and programme/ feedback to CoRE examples/highlighting resources required – EL/Library etc
  • Being and becoming model – being and becoming a scientistSustainable, effective, student centred learningModel can be applied to other areas  Wider impact – feeding back into development of curriculum re reading list development/assessment guidance and brief/marking rubric/standardised approach ie to referencing across modules and programme/ feedback to CoRE examples/highlighting resrouces required – EL/Library etc Effect on student experience – anxiety/mental health? – evaluative study required? I have a couple of specifics for Scientific Investigation – not sure if it’s what you’re looking for…? From my point of view the Module was definitely improved upon this year, which was exemplified in a better pass mark with an increase in cohort size. The numbers don’t lie….!! In terms of what was reason for this improvement was – I’m not completely sure. I think we should watch the module over the next few sessions to get a clearer outlook.  For PDP we saw an increase in average mark (from 35 % to 62 %) and for the poster session an increase (from 59 % to 79 %). The remaining assessed components were largely left unchanged from 2011-12. I think that the improvements can be rationalised by a number of factors. Implementation of the University attendance policy significantly improved results by removing non-engaging students. The input from Effective Learning had clear benefits, particularly in defining and supporting the PDP elements. The additional postgraduate support was also helpful in supporting the student cohort through the year. The improvements to the poster assessment are difficult to quantify directly between 2011-12 and 2012-13 as the assessment had changed and the new format was in my opinion more engaging and interesting for the students. From student feedback (observed in the ePortfolio) the module seemed to be widely appreciated by students, who were enthusiastic about the diversity of material being studied and in the support they were provided.
  • The problem that I and many of my colleagues have identified is; that since moving to 20 point modules we seem to have less opportunity to create a ‘VERTICAL’ development in learning a range of the generic skills i.e. progressing from L7 to L10 in for example; report writing skills, or data analysis, or oral presentations, etc. This is probably exacerbated by the fact that academics rarely engage with more than a couple of modules at each level in a programme, so we do not know what each other is teaching the students in any detail, and this applies also to the development of the generic skills. Interestingly, the ‘problem’ of large classes has meant that some academics are now seeking the assistance of colleagues in helping to mark (assess/grade) the scripts for large cohorts and with technical developments like TurnitinGrademark, we are getting a much better of idea of common ‘problems’ in effective assessment and also of potential solutions ! The potential for you and your colleagues to help us in creating a range of generic grading feedback, etc is most welcome. The IT developments also suggest new ways to ‘engage’ students, such as with the use of the spoken word through voice overs in short U-tube style videos, animated presentations, online assessment, etc

Embedding graduate attributes and pdp final version Embedding graduate attributes and pdp final version Presentation Transcript

  • EmbeddingGraduateAttributes andPDPA Student Centred Approach toCurriculum Development in theBiosciencesAlison McEntee; Effective Learning Tutor,CAPLeDLucy Carroll; Science LibrarianRobin Freeburn; Lecturer, School of ScienceConceptual model developed with MarjorieMcCrory , PhD Student, School of Education
  • PDP/Graduate attributesPersonal Development Planning (PDP) is ‘astructured and supported process undertakenby an individual to reflect upon their ownlearning, performance and/or achievementand to plan for their personal, educational andcareer development’ (QAA, 2009 p. 2).It is important to translate ‘graduate attributesinto learner centred curricula; and… [support]staff and students in developing sharedmeanings of them in their particular disciplinaryand institutional contexts’ (QAA, 2009 p. 12).
  • BackgroundPrior to 2010/11 Technical Communication and PersonalDevelopment module; PDP and IT skills Taught separately from subject content2010/11 to 2011/12 Trimester one; Generic PDP sessions(‘extra’sessions) No explicit connection with subject Scientific Investigation module in TrimesterTwo
  • The challenge Large student cohort A range of Science programmes Showing value and relevance to learningof PDP and ePortfolios, and Graduate Attributes/employability Relevance to subject area
  • The new approachFrom 2012/13Programme focus; more specific links to science; PDPas ‘being and becoming’ a scientist Trimester one Delivered as part of cells and molecules lectures Assignment specific links – tutorial sessions Trimester two Delivered as part of scientific investigation lectures More focus on the process of PDP/ePortfoliocreation in subject specific context
  • Information literacy Information literacy is knowing whenand why you need information; whereto find it; and how to evaluate, use andcommunicate it in an ethical manner.Knowing when and whyyou need information –exploring the essayquestion session Where to find information– finding information forassignments session &finding literature for acase study session How to evaluate, useand communicateinformation – sessions onreferencing & plagiarism
  • Academic Literacies Literacies as social practice (Lea and Street 1998, 2004). Writing as ‘an epistemic process in which thinking andreflection develop...and as a communicative product,structured in particular ways by particular conventionsand forming particular, recognisable social functions’(Britton 1982, p.94) Writing in Higher Education ‘involves new ways ofknowing; new ways of understanding, interpreting andorganising knowledge’ (Lea and Street 1998, p.158) Writing as ‘usefully problematic’; writing to learn andlearning to write (Britton 1982, p.94; Young 2002)
  • Policy drivers Personal Development Planning Reflective Learning Effective Learning Framework Graduate Attributes HEA Employability Profiles SCQF level descriptors/learning outcomes
  • AssessmentGraduateAttributesStudentHEAEmployabilityProfilesUWSGraduateAttributesSCQF/LearningOutcomes PDP/ePortfolioAssessmentAssessment
  • EssayGraduateAttributesStudentHEAEmployabilityProfilesUWSGraduateAttributesSCQF/LearningOutcomes PDP/ePortfolioAssessmentAssessment
  • EssayGraduateAttributesStudentHEAEmployabilityProfilesUWSGraduateAttributesSCQF/LearningOutcomes PDP/ePortfolioAssessmentAssessment
  • EssayGraduateAttributesStudentHEAEmployabilityProfilesUWSGraduateAttributesSCQF/LearningOutcomes PDP/ePortfolioAssessmentAssessment
  • EssayGraduateAttributesStudentHEAEmployabilityProfilesUWSGraduateAttributesSCQF/LearningOutcomesAssessmentAssessment
  • Cells &MoleculesAn Introduction toBIOL 0700116
  • Who are we?Dr Robin Freeburn(Lectures & Tutorials)Margaret Train(Lab Classes)Alison McEntee/Lucy Carroll( (Effective Learning Tutor/Science Librarian)Further details in the module handbook17
  • » 100% COURSEWORK BASED˃4 x lab classes (40%)˃4 x class tests (40%)˃1 essay (20%)18PDP/ Effective Learning
  • ˃1 essay (20%)˃1 essay˃Essay Plan (10%)˃Essay submission (90%)˃Tutorial on Academic Writing (AMcE)˃Tutorial on referencing and plagiarism (LC)˃Plan submission → Marked & Feedback (Turnitin)˃Essay submission (90%)˃Marks & Feedback (individual on Turnitin)˃General Essay Feedback tutorial (AMcE)19
  • Benefits Greatly improved structure for both plan and Essay Introduction – referring to the question Main body – use of sections Conclusion / summary Referencing much more consistent Figures referenced URLs Staff engagement Use of Turnitin and Grademark
  • Benefits Collaborative working between staff Consistent approach Curriculum development (marking andfeedback rubrics/reading lists)
  • ‘…a really important way to ‘embed’ thedevelopment of PDP i.e. by the academic setting asubject related task that students will seek to do wellto earn marks, so they are given the ‘benefit’ ofsome generic skill training, for which they canimmediately see the ‘value’ . This means that theyDO engage well with the opportunity and everyonesucceeds in enhancing the learning! In effect, wehave a mechanism that means that students DO getmarks for doing their ‘PDP’ work (this overcomes theone reason everyone suggests that students don’tengage with the PDP training i.e. because they arenot given ‘marks’).’
  • The way forward Programme based development Learning objects at all programme levels Support for ‘vertical’ student development Embedding of Academic literacies Digital and information literacy Policy drivers embedded as learning processes Will inform curriculum development andmodule assessment
  • Bibliography Catt, R. & Gregory, G. (2006) The Point of Writing: Is Student Writing in HigherEducation Developed or Merely Assessed? In Ganobcsik-Williams, L. (ed.)Teaching Academic Writing in UK Higher Education: Theories, Practices andModels. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 16-28 Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (2004) InformationLiteracy: definition. [Online] Available: http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/information-literacy/pages/definition.aspx [Accessed: 14June 2013]. Higher Education Academy (2007) Student Employability profiles: a guide.[Online] Available: http://www-new2.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/employability/Employability_profiles_print_pdf [Accessed: 13 June 2013]. Ivanic , R & Lea M.R. (2006) New Contexts, New Challenges: the Teaching ofWriting in UK Higher Education In Ganobcsik-Williams, L.(ed.) TeachingAcademic Writing in UK Higher Education: Theories, Practices and Models.Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 6-14.
  •  Ivanic , R & Lea M.R. (2006) New Contexts, New Challenges: the Teaching ofWriting in UK Higher Education In Ganobcsik-Williams, L.(ed.) TeachingAcademic Writing in UK Higher Education: Theories, Practices and Models.Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 6-14. Lea, Mary R. (2004) Academic literacies: a pedagogy for course design.Studies in Higher Education. Vol 29(6), pp. 739-756. Lea, Mary R. and Street, Brian V.(1998) Student writing in higher education: Anacademic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education. Vol 23(2), pp.157-172. Lillis, T. (2006) Moving towards an ’Academic Literacies’ Pedagogy: Dialoguesof Participation. In Ganobcsik-Williams, L. (ed.) Teaching Academic Writing inUK Higher Education: Theories, Practices and Models. Basingstoke: PalgraveMacMillan, pp.13-43.
  •  Mitchell, S. and Evison, A. (2006) Exploiting the Potential of Writing forEducational Change at Queen Mary, University of London. In Ganobcsik-Williams, L. (ed.) Teaching Academic Writing in UK Higher Education: Theories,Practices and Models. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, pp.68-82. Quality Assurance Agency (2009) Research-Teaching Linkages: enhancinggraduate attributes. [Online] Available:http://www.enhancementthemes.ac.uk/docs/publications/research-teaching-linkages-enhancing-graduate-attributes-overview-report.pdf[Accessed: 13 June 2013]. Quality Assurance Agency (n.d.) Employability: Effective Learning andEmployability. [Online] Available:http://www.enhancementthemes.ac.uk/docs/publications/employability-effective-learning-and-employability.pdf?sfvrsn=20 [Accessed: 13 June 2013]. Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (2012) SCQF Level Descriptors.[Online] Available:http://www.scqf.org.uk/content/files/SCQF%20Revised%20Level%20Descriptors%20-%20Aug%202012%20-%20FINAL%20-%20web%20version.pdf [Accessed 13June 2013]