The Supply Chain of Talent
 

The Supply Chain of Talent

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Companies that clearly understand the talent available in-house and effectively gauge the talent available outside the organization will be better positioned to access and obtain the workforce they ...

Companies that clearly understand the talent available in-house and effectively gauge the talent available outside the organization will be better positioned to access and obtain the workforce they need—this is what we call the ‘Supply Chain of Talent’ framework.
To gain a better understanding of your Supply Chain of Talent, KellyOCG compiled this research report with the Human Capital Institute.

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The Supply Chain of Talent The Supply Chain of Talent Presentation Transcript

  • The Supply Chainof Talent
  • The Supply Chain of Talent contents 3 A visual summary 4 Introduction 5 Executive Summary 6 Assessing Skilled Talent Challenges 7 Supply Chain of Talent — The New Talent Acquisition Strategy 9 The Supply Chain of Talent Framework in Action 11 Use of Supply Chain of Talent & Business Leader Satisfaction 13 Recommendations & Conclusion 14 A Closer Look: Subgroup Analyses 18 Appendix A: Respondent Demographics 20 Appendix B: Works Consulted 21 Definition of Key Terms About this research This research was developed in partnership between the Human Capital Institute (HCI) and Kelly Services between April 2011 and February 2012. Two hundred eighty professionals from HCI member companies completed a 25-item survey. The survey was supplemented with several in-depth interviews with talent management thought leaders from organizations such as the Wharton School of Business and Intel Corporation. HCI researchers compiled additional secondary research from a variety of sources, including white papers, articles, books, interviews, and case studies. Several of these are cited in the report, and a full reference list can be found on page 20. Copyright © 2012 Human Capital Institute and Kelly Services. All rights reserved. 2
  • T H e s u p p ly c h a i n o f t a l e n t14mU.S. workers are unemployedbut there are 3.2 million unfilledjobs across the country. who do we employ? just 55 % adopt the ‘supply chain of talent’ framework to manage the supply and demand of talent Satisfaction with access to talent 6% non-users 33% supply chain usersless than halfof organizations consider and analyzethe external demand for talent35 % fail to evaluate the external supply altogether <10% of organizations conduct market analysis of external supply, including a review of workforce demographics such as age, education level and the unemployment rate79 % of business leaders are not “very satisfied” with their ability to access talent when needed. who will we need? 20% of organizations in north america work with search firms/agencies to better understand the availability of talent. By comparison, 39% of companies in other regions utilize this method of research. 30% who is available?The frustration of those who obtain external supplyof Talent supply information rely on popular social mediais widespread networks, such as LinkedIn—which when used as the only method of research, cannot provide aLess than 10% holistic view of the external talent poolsof leaders outside North Americaare satisfied with their access to theright talent for the job. who else is competing for this talent?3
  • The Supply Chain of TalentIntroductionThe effects of the Great Recession of 2008-2009 This understanding can be greatly informed by basiccontinue to reverberate worldwide as economies Supply Chain Management principles. When appliedstruggle to realize sustained growth and unemployment to the challenge of managing talent, we refer to thatrates remain high. In this sluggish recovery, a talent framework as the Supply Chain of Talent. By consideringparadox has emerged. the following four questions, business and human capital leaders can assess where they are and where they need Teresa CarrollMore talent is available today than at nearly any to be in talent procurement:other time in history. A U.S. unemployment rate of 9percent lends itself to an increasingly widespread pool • Who is employed and what are their skill set profiles?of available talent, but continued advancements in • What skills are needed to meet short- and long-termtechnology have created a need for skills and experience strategic objectives?that remain in short supply. A 2010 report noted,“There are still about 3 million job openings across the • Where are the needed skills? How will that talent becountry” and employers are struggling to find qualified identified?people for many of those positions.”3 As a result, thecurrent talent supply is simply unable to meet aggregate • What other organizations are competing for this talentorganizational demand. and what are the levers of differentiation required to attract needed talent?To be successful and fully leverage the large talent pooltoday, organizations must have a more comprehensive Companies that clearly understand the talent availableunderstanding of the availability and competition for in-house and clearly gauge the talent available outsidetalent within given sectors, including inside and outside the organization will be better positioned to access andtheir own companies. obtain the workforce needed for success.3 Arnold, Chris (Nov. 16, 2010). To Fill Job Skills, Firm Brings Training In House. npr.org.4
  • The Supply Chain of Talentexecutive summaryIt’s a paradox of our economic times: more than organizations that are satisfied tend to be those that14 million U.S. workers are unemployed, but 3.2 million manage talent according to supply chain principles.positions are open.1 Economists call this mismatch“structural unemployment.” Filling skill-specific For most organizations, truly thinking about talent needspositions has been a widespread problem for high-tech and acquisitions in a supply chain framework is a newcompanies, illustrated by Microsoft’s recent plea to the idea. Just as a supply chain of raw goods and materialsSenate Judiciary Committee to allow them to “import” is managed in manufacturing, access to skill-specificmore workers to fill talent gaps.2 But organizations in talent can be effectively procured and managed using aother sectors are scrambling to fill positions as well. talent supply chain. Both sides – the supply of talent andSkill shortages have been reported for jobs as varied the demand for talent inside and outside the company-as electricians, scientists, CAD/CAM (computer-aided need to be diligently managed to find the right balancedesign and manufacturing), truck drivers, trades people, between open positions and the talent available to filland call-center workers. those roles.This report summarizes the results of research Based on our analysis, we recommend three measures toundertaken by the Human Capital Institute (HCI) improve and strengthen the talent acquisition process.and Kelly Services to explore how Supply Chain Organizations must:Management principles can effectively be applied • Start acting and thinking like the market for talentto Talent Management strategy in this challenging has supply and demand competitive dynamics likeenvironment. Our research included a survey of 280 any other.talent-management executives and professionals in HCImember organizations in spring 2011. • Analyze supply and demand internally and externally.The survey explored how organizations understand and • Focus on getting real, robust and accurate talentsource talent, as well as their satisfaction with these information — not fragmented information fromprocesses and results. multiple and unrelated sources that have been used in the past.We find that overall, only 20% of companies are fullysatisfied with their access to talent. We also find that1 Sullivan, Brian (Oct. 10, 2011). Need Work? U.S. Has 3.2 Million Unfilled Job Openings. cnbc.com.2 McDougall, Paul (July 29, 2011). Microsoft: Thousands of IT Jobs Go Unfilled. informationweek.com. 2011 HCI Research5
  • The Supply Chain of TalentAccessing Skilled TalentChallenges Today’s LeadersA significant body of research demonstrates the How satisfied are your business leaders with yourimportance of human capital to overall business organization’s ability to access talent when needed?performance — productivity, efficiency and the bottomline. However, fewer than a quarter (21 percent) of our “Very Satisfied”survey respondents say that their organization’s businessleaders are very satisfied with their ability to access 21%talent when needed. Results for this measure and otherswere examined by geography, size of company, revenue All Othersand business sector, and they do not vary significantly bythese factors. Selected data tables may be found at the 79%end of the report.What can explain this lack of satisfaction among businessleaders with their ability to access talent? We believethat companies are not thinking about their talent needsin a comprehensive way.6
  • The Supply Chain of TalentThe Supply Chain of Talent —The New Talent Acquisition StrategyA number of leaders in business and human capital The Supply Chain of Talent leverages the principles ofhave argued that talent can and should be managed the Supply Chain Management and applies them to talentway that the supply chain of raw goods and materials is management. According to Dr. Peter Cappelli of themanaged (i.e., managing for both need and uncertainty). Wharton School of Business, “An employer … wouldIn this view, a Supply Chain of Talent mindset and like HR to think about personnel from the perspective ofmethodology has the potential to address the current money and costs, and what [would] happen if you don’tshortcomings of the traditional methods of talent have the right people in place to do the necessary jobs.”planning and acquisition. Thus, effectively managing supply chains is principally about managing uncertainty and variability. “This sameSupply Chain Management argues that a network uncertainty exists inside companies. Companies rarelyof interconnected business units must be effectively know what they will be building five years out and whatmanaged to ensure that inventory levels are consistent skills they will need to make that happen; they also don’twith consumer demand for them. Everything from the know if the people they have in their pipelines are goingnumber of raw materials to the time it takes for products to be around.”4to be built, to where those products are distributedand how those products are consumed, must be clearlyassessed, evaluated, and streamlined. The integrationof each of these moving processes creates a chain ofevents that, when properly managed, improves the long-term performance of an organization and the supplychain as a whole.4 Knowledge@Wharton “Talent on Demand: Applying Supply Chain Management to People” February 20, 2008, knowledge.wharton. upenn.edu.7
  • The Supply Chain of TalentThe Supply Chain of Talent —The New Talent Acquisition StrategyIn this way, an organization’s most critical supply chain A key premise of supply chain management is theis its supply chain of talent. To effectively manage the ability to look both inward and outward at raw materials,supply chain of talent, organizations must obtain a clear finances, services, and tools available — employingunderstanding of when, where, and how their talent that information to build a strategy to create moreneeds are being met. This is no small undertaking, value for both the producer and consumer. Applied tothough. “In most crises of supply and demand, we can talent strategy and acquisition, a more comprehensivemanufacture a new supply. Whether it is oil, consumer perspective on the supply and demand of talent is likelygoods or even money, ways are found to create more,” to improve access to high-quality talent. The currentJason Averbrook explains. “However, when it comes HCI/ Kelly Services survey design allows us to examineto individual skill sets, solving the supply and demand the degree to which organizations employ a Supplycrisis is not as simple. And without visibility into what we Chain of Talent framework, or the degree to which theyalready have, what we need, and where we will need it examine the following:in the future, it’s virtually impossible.”5 • Internal Supply — Who do we employ? • Internal Demand — Who will we need? • External Supply — Who is available? • External Demand — Who else is competing for this talent?5 Averbook, Jason (June 27, 2011). The ‘New Normal’ of Talent Management. LRP Publications8
  • The Supply Chain of TalentThe Supply Chain of TalentFramework in ActionThe majority of organizations surveyed report that they Does your organization evaluate internal supply of talent;study their internal supply of and demand for talent project internal demand for talent; evaluate external supply of talent;(79 and 72 percent, respectively). However, fewer than project external demand for talent?half (47 percent) consider and analyze the externaldemand for talent, and about one third (35 percent) fail External Demandto evaluate the external supply of talent. 47%Internal supply and demand information tends to 53%readily accessible to organizations, while externalinformation is more elusive. For instance, forecastingmethods are often used within succession management External Supplyplans and inter-organizational deployment opportunities, 65%and that data can easily speak to overall internal talentsupply and demand. Further, organizations can gather 35%additional internal talent data as needed, tapping their Yessuccession plans, performance reviews and career Nodevelopment plans to gauge internal talent supply Internal Demandand demand. 72% 28% Internal Supply 79% 21%9
  • The Supply Chain of TalentThe Supply Chain of TalentFramework in ActionBy contrast, evaluating the external supply of and How often does your organization use the following sourcesdemand for talent is considerably more difficult. Many to better understand the availability of talent in a market?organizations do not have the tools or data needed to Use social network sites, such as LinkedInobtain this information as routinely and quickly as they 30%do for internal information. As the Figure 3 illustrates, 70%few organizations report frequent use of any methodsfor gathering information about the external talent Work with career centers at universitiessupply. At most, about one-third of organizations rely 29% 71%on the most popular sources, social networks such asLinkedIn (30 percent) and university career centers Work with search firms/agencies(29 percent). So, routine use of these methods certainly 20%is not widespread. And even if it were, none of these 80%methods employed taken alone can provide a holistic Conduct in-person events, such as open houses/orientationsview of external talent pools. 12% 88% “Frequently” Conduct a market analysis including review of workforce demographics Less Often such as age, education level, unemployment rate, etc. (“Occasionally” / “Seldom” / 9% “Never”) 91% Work with state employment agencies to identify types of workers in their pipeline that meet your needs 9% 91% Conduct a marketing campaign to evaluate potential workforce response/interest 6% 94% Contact with competitors/other companies to explore workforce synergies/sharing 4% 96%10
  • The Supply Chain of TalentUse of Supply Chain of Talent &Business Leader SatisfactionDoes it pay off for organizations to adopt the Supply Breakdown of Supply Chain of Talent Users & Non-UsersChain of Talent? We find that the answer is “Yes.” Non-UsersIn order to test our assertion that the adoptionof a supply chain framework should improve an 45%organization’s overall talent acquisition, we grouped oursurvey companies into two categories: Supply Chain ofTalent Users and Non-Users. Our measure of the success Supply Chain of Talent Usersof an organization’s talent acquisition is business leaders’ 55%satisfaction with access to talent.In this analysis, Supply Chain of Talent Users areorganizations that report evaluating both the internalsupply and demand of talent, while also assessing atleast one external measure of supply or demand (or,at least three of the four elements deemed critical forSupply Chain of Talent success).We found that slightly more than half (55 percent) ofrespondent organizations use the Supply Chain ofTalent, while the remaining 45 percent do not.11
  • The Supply Chain of TalentUse of Supply Chain of Talent &Business Leader SatisfactionMore importantly, organizations that employ a Supply How satisfied are your business leaders with yourChain of Talent have a significantly higher rate of organization’s ability to access talent when needed?business leader satisfaction with access to talent. Non-UsersThese findings confirm that organizations with a more 6%holistic understanding of what talent they need, whereit comes from, and what factors influence it, are betterpositioned to access and obtain the types of talent they 94%truly need to be successful. Supply Chain of Talent Usersplace a high value on understanding what drives the “Very satisfied”supply and demand of talent. And those that evaluate Supply Chain of Talent Users all othersseveral, if not all, of the internal and external elementsof talent supply and demand yield leaders who are more 33%satisfied with their ability to tap into talent pools. 67%12
  • The Supply Chain of TalentRecommendations & ConclusionOur research uncovers that only about 20 percent of In order for organizations to improve and strengthenbusiness leaders are fully satisfied with the access they their talent acquisition process, we recommendhave to the talent they need. This fact is distressing the following:alone, but even more troublesome when one considers • Start acting and thinking like the market for talentthe current structural unemployment in the U.S. – has supply and demand competitive dynamics like“unfilled jobs in the midst of mass unemployment.”6 any otherA straightforward way to address the problem of • Analyze supply and demand internally and externally.insufficient access to talent is to redefine the strategyaround talent acquisition and planning. Like a • Focus on getting real, robust, and accurate talentmanufacturing supply chain, effective talent acquisition is information — not fragmented information froma combination of knowing what the supply and demand multiple and unrelated sources that have been used infor talent is — both inside and outside an organization. the past.Talent supply chain analysis is a fresh approach to talentacquisition and planning, one that can help companiessolve the talent paradox they find themselves in — aparadox that has led to companies with insufficienttalent bench strength.6 Samuelson, Robert, June 20, 2011, “Why Are So Many Jobs Going Unfilled?” realclearmarkets.com.13
  • The Supply Chain of TalentA Closer Look: Subgroup AnalysisWhen we examine business leader satisfaction with How satisfied are your business leaders with youraccess to talent by geography, we find that leaders organization’s ability to access talent when needed?outside of North America are even less satisfied than By Geographic Regiontheir counterparts in North America are (fewer than10 percent are fully satisfied). North America 23% 77% Other 9% “Very satisfied” all others 91% Total 21% 79%14
  • The Supply Chain of TalentA Closer Look: Subgroup AnalysisInterestingly, no significant differences exist among How satisfied are your business leaders with yourindustries, suggesting that frustration with talent supply organization’s ability to access talent when needed?is widespread. By Industry Industrial Goods and Services 36% 64% Government 25% 75% Health Care 25% 75% Professional Services 25% “Very satisfied” 75% all others Other 22% 78% Non-Profit 17% 83% Banking/Financial Services 14% 86% Tech 10% 90%15
  • The Supply Chain of TalentA Closer Look: Subgroup AnalysisFor the most part, North American organizations and How often does your organization use the following sourcesthose located in other regions behave similarly in to better understand the availability of talent in a market?terms of assessing the external talent supply – with the (Percent answering “Frequently”) By Geographic Regionexception that companies outside of North America are Use social network sites, such as LinkedInmore likely to rely on search firms. 30% 30% 33%Overall, respondent companies report relatively limited Work with career centers at universitiesconsiderations of the external supply of talent are 29% 29%limited. We do find differences among industries in the 36%particular methods used. For example, professional Work with search firms/agenciesservices companies are particularly likely to rely on 20%social networking sites such as LinkedIn, while health 18% 39%care organizations report relatively greater consultation Conduct in-person events, such as open houses/orientationswith college career centers. Search firms are used to a 12%relatively low degree in the government, health care, 11% total 15%and health-care sectors. Conduct a market analysis including review of workforce demographics north America such as age, education level, unemployment rate, etc. other 9% 9% 12% Work with state employment agencies to identify types of workers in their pipeline that meet your needs 9% 9% 6% Conduct a marketing campaign to evaluate potential workforce response/interest 6% 7% 6% Contact with competitors/ other companies to explore workforce synergies/sharing 4% 4% 6%16
  • The Supply Chain of TalentA Closer Look: Subgroup AnalysisHow often does your organization use the following sources to better understandthe availability of talent in a market? (Percent answering “Frequently”) By Industry Total Banking/ Govern- Health Industrial Non-Profit Prof. Tech Financial ment Care Goods & Services Services ServicesUse social network sites, such as LinkedIn 30% 36% 7% 25% 18% 17% 54% 33%Work with career centers at universities 29% 14% 21% 54% 9% 6% 29% 33%Work with search firms/ agencies 20% 25% 4% 7% 36% 0% 25% 27%Conduct in-person events, such as open houses/ orientations 12% 4% 7% 25% 0% 17% 14% 3%Conduct a market analysis including review of 9% 4% 7% 14% 9% 0% 18% 0%workforce demographics such as age, educationlevel, unemployment rate, etc.Work with state employment agencies to identify types 9% 0% 4% 18% 9% 17% 14% 7%of workers in their pipeline that meet your needsConduct a marketing campaign to evaluate 6% 0% 14% 7% 0% 0% 14% 0%potential workforce response/interestContact with competitors/ other companies to 4% 4% 0% 7% 9% 6% 7% 7%explore workforce synergies/sharing17
  • The Supply Chain of TalentAppendix A:respondent demographics Industry Industry Industry Org’s revenue Org’s revenue Org’s revenue Number of employees Number of employees of employees Number Region Industry Organization’s revenue number of employees Technology Technology Technology Less than $10 million Less than $10 million Less than $10 million Less than 1,000 Less than 1,000 Less than 1,000 North Amer Professional Services Professional Services Professional Services $10-100 million $10-100 million $10-100 million 1,000-3,000 1,000-3,000 1,000-3,000 Asia/Pacific Government Government Government $100-500 million $100-500 million $100-500 million 3,001-5,000 3,001-5,000 3,001-5,000 Europe Health Care Health Care Health Care $500 million-1 billion $500 million-1 billion $500 million-1 billion 5,001-10,000 5,001-10,000 5,001-10,000 Central/Sou Non-Profit/Charity Non-Profit/Charity Non-Profit/Charity $1-10 billion $1-10 billion $1-10 billion 10,000 + 10,000 + 10,000 + Africa Financial Services Financial Services Financial Services $10 billion + $10 billion + $10 billion + Middle East Banking Banking Banking N/A Government or Non-Profit N/A Government or Non-Profit N/A Government or Non-Profit Industrial Goods and Services Industrial Goods and Services Goods and Services Industrial Insurance Insurance Insurance Retail Retail Retail Media Media Media Construction and Materials Construction and Materials Construction and Materials Food and Beverage Food and Beverage Food and Beverage Other (each <3% of total) Other (each <3% of total) Other (each <3% of total)18
  • The Supply Chain of Talent Appendix A: respondent demographicsyees Region Region Region Respondent’s Level Level Respondent’s Respondent’s Level Respondent’s Function Respondent’s Function Function Respondent’s region respondent’s level respondent’s function North AmericaNorth AmericaNorth America Director/Senior Director Director/Senior Director Director/Senior Director Human Resources Resources Human Human Resources Asia/Pacific Asia/Pacific Asia/Pacific Manager/Middle Manager Manager/Middle Manager Manager/Middle Manager Operations Operations Operations Europe Europe Europe Team Member Team MemberTeam Member Other (each <3% of(each <3% of total) <3% of total) Other total) Other (each Central/South Central/South America Central/South America America Vice President/Sr. President/Sr. Vice President Vice President Vice Vice President President/Sr. Vice Africa Africa Africa C-Level (CEO, CHRO, CIO etc), Executive/President etc), Executive/President C-Level (CEO, C-Level CIO etc), Executive/President CHRO, (CEO, CHRO, CIO Middle East Middle East Middle East Other Other Other 19
  • The Supply Chain of TalentAppendix B:works consultedArnold, Chris (November 16, 2010). To Fill Job Skills, Firm Brings Training In House. npr.orgAverbook, Jason (June 27, 2011). The ‘New Normal’ of Talent Management. LRP PublicationsBoudreau, John W. (January 7, 2008). Supply Chain Logic for Evidence-Based Talent Management. Marshall School of BusinessBurns, Susan (December 12, 2010). Planning For the Future of Talent Acquisition: Meet the Talent Broker. talentsynchronicity.comThe Center for Association Leadership (March 15, 2011). Baby Boomer Retirement and Unretirement; Talent Shortages. The Center for Association LeadershipCoombs, Bertha (March 3, 2011). Jobs Go Unfilled Despite High Unemployment. CNBC.comGuthridge, Matthew; Komm, Asmus B; and Lawson, Emily (January 2008). Making Talent a Strategic Priority. mckinseyquarterly.comKelly Services Marketing Information Department (July 2009) Global Contingent Labor Workforce Trends. Kelly ServicesKnowledge@Wharton (February 2008). Talent on Demand: Applying Supply Chain Management to People. knowledge.wharton.upenn.eduMcDogall, Paul (July 29, 2011). Microsoft: Thousands of IT Jobs Going Unfilled. informationweek.comSafani, Barbara (April 18, 2011). Six Job Skills in High Demand. jobs.aol.comSamuelson, Robert (June 20, 2011). Why Are So Many Jobs Going Unfilled? realclearmarkets.comSokol Ratkiewicz, K., & Krekeler Weite, A. (July 2011). Connecting the Dots: Comprehensive CareerDevelopment as a Catalyst for Employee Engagement. Human Capital InstituteSullivan, Brian (October 10, 2011). Need Work? U.S. Has 3.2 Million Unfilled Job Openings. cnbc.com20
  • The Supply Chain of TalentDefinition of Key TermsTalent External Supply of TalentThe term talent includes: The number of potential workers within a given market, job classification or job type that are available to meet• FTE: Full- and part-time employees who are part of an organization’s hiring needs. the organization’s regular, traditional workforce.• Contract Talent: Full- and part-time workers and Internal Demand for Talent independent contractors who are not part of the organization’s regular, traditional workforce, including A projection of the demand for certain skills and freelancers, temporary help, interim executives positions a company will need in a given period of time. and consultants.• Outsourced services within an organization, External Demand for Talent i.e., a help desk or tech support desk. The aggregate figures of organizations looking to hire potential workers within a given market, job classification or job type. If demand for certain skill-Internal Supply of Talent based talent is high, it will be harder to find or attractThe talent and skills of those currently employed by this type of talent.an organization, including FTE, Contract Talent andOutsourced Services.21
  • About the authorAs SVP, Centers of Excellence for Kelly Services, Teresa Carroll is responsible forleading a team that manages the brand, develops solutions for clients, and supportsKelly’s vision of providing the world’s best workforce solutions. .About Human Capital Institute (HCI)The Human Capital Institute (HCI) is a catalyst for innovative new thinking in talent acquisition,development, deployment and new economy leadership. Through research and collaboration, our globalnetwork of more than 138,000 members develops and promotes creativity, best and next practices,and actionable solutions in strategic talent management. Executives, practitioners, and thought leadersrepresenting organizations of all sizes, across public, charitable and government sectors, utilize HCIcommunities, education, events and research to foster talent advantages to ensure organizationalchange for competitive results. In tandem with these initiatives, HCI’s Human Capital Strategistprofessional certifications and designations set the bar for expertise in talent strategy, acquisition,development and measurement. www.hci.orgAbout KellyOCGKellyOCG is the Outsourcing and Consulting Group of Fortune 500 workforce solutions provider,Kelly Services, Inc. KellyOCG is a global leader in innovative talent management solutions in the areasof Recruitment Process Outsourcing (RPO), Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), Contingent WorkforceOutsourcing (CWO), including Independent Contractor Solutions, Human Resources Consulting, CareerTransition and Organizational Effectiveness, and Executive Search. Further information about KellyOCGmay be found at kellyocg.com. EXIT