7 lessons for good leaders
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This new ebook is extracted from the whitepaper "Leading by Example. Why Managers are Failing to Create Strong Employment Brands." by Kristin Supancich and Hector Ortiz. ...

This new ebook is extracted from the whitepaper "Leading by Example. Why Managers are Failing to Create Strong Employment Brands." by Kristin Supancich and Hector Ortiz.
It is providing 7 lessons leaders need to learn to become a employer of choice for their employees.

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7 lessons for good leaders Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 7lessonsfor goodleadersKristin supancich
  • 2. 2 | seven lessons for good leaders01forget Senior leaders, HR professionals and management consultants are Across all generations and regions, these two factors (leadership style To improve leaders’ performance, employers will need to reconsiderexperience, always trying to answer the perennial and vision) consistently rate above the way they seek and promote question, “what makes a good issues of communication, personality talent in their organization. Manyfocus on leader?” For all the testing and and experience. In fact, less than 5% employees indicate willingness tovision performance coaching on earth, nothing tells us more than employees’ of employees feel that experience is the key factor in determining accept inexperienced leaders if they demonstrate the right leadership actual experiences of being led. leadership ability. When we consider style, and organizations must adapt that ‘experience’ is perhaps the most to pinpoint and build leadership skills, Consistently, employees say a prevalent way employers assess rather than assuming they will simply positive leadership style that responds people’s suitability for promotion, develop over time. to their individual needs, and the there is a significant disconnect here ability to provide a clear vision and between employer expectations and direction are what they want most employee experience. from their leaders. A leadership style they can relate to, and the ability to deliver a clear ‘vision’ is what employees want most from their leaders.home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 3. 3 | seven lessons for good leaders02 educate about Generation X consistently rates as the generation most favored for leadership qualities. These two older generations also consistently display about human relationships. We relate to our own generation best, and generational their leadership ability, with most of a lack of confidence in Generation particularly when we’re just starting that support coming from peers and Y’s leadership abilities, and it seems out in our careers, we prefer to be differences, Generation Y. While Baby Boomers are Generation Y’s themselves agree managed by someone not too distant looK for yet to provide their seal of approval to Gen X leaders specifically, they are with this assessment. Although Generation Y’s rate themselves in age from ourselves. Large age gaps have the tendency to invoke feelings natural just as likely as younger workers to higher than their older counterparts, of being misunderstood, but it’s true connections believe that age has no bearing on leadership ability. fewer than one in ten feel their own generation has displayed good that there are significant differences in attitude and work style across the leadership qualities thus far. generations. So, to create strong Generation X and Baby Boomers leaders, you need to give them a solid are the most confident of their own Rather than taking these assessments grounding in what makes the different leadership abilities and around half purely on face value, we should think generations tick. rate their peers as having the best seriously about what this is saying Generation X is singled out as the group with the strongest leadership ability, but what is this really telling us? home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 4. 4 | seven lessons for good leaders03dissatisfaction Employees worldwide give their managers only a marginal ‘pass’ nature of this assessment suggests that people’s experiences of leadership Generation Y employees consistently rate the performance of theiris high—it’s mark for overall performance in the are generally average at best. If this is managers above those in older the case, the prospects of employees generations, but even here thetime to do way they lead their teams. Across all regions, managers score just 6.4 learning strong leadership skills from difference is only small. There is only asomething out of a possible 10 points—well their managers are low and companies need to consider how to teach and single point’s difference between the lowest rating and the highest—Gen Y’s below the high-performance levelabout it that many companies would hope promote the concept of leadership in the America’s are most satisfied to be achieving. more directly. To put it simply, we need with their manager’s performance to stop thinking strong leaders are (6.9 points), while Baby Boomers It’s tempting to dismiss this as going to come out of environments and Gen X’ers in EMEA are the least employees simply asking ‘too much’ with consistently poor leadership satisfied, awarding their managers just of managers, yet the widespread examples to learn from. 5.9 points on average. Employees are largely dissatisfied with the leadership they experience—and older workers are more so.home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 5. 5 | seven lessons for good leaders04recognize and Less than half of employees (44%) feel that their efforts at work are The most common form of recognition is simply that employees’ Recognition for achievement is paramount to an engaged workforce.reward what’s recognized and rewarded. This means skills are noticed by management. People do not necessarily look for that they do not receive feedback, Across the regions, the ways that financial reward, but they do expectworKing incentives or bonuses of any kind for employees reported being recognized exceptional efforts to be noticed. With high performance. and rewarded was consistent, half of employees not receiving even although slightly more people in the most basic recognition for a job Across all generations, employees in EMEA are being rewarded for their well done, leaders need to rethink their EMEA are less satisfied than those in efforts with bonuses and incentives role in motivating their teams. other regions and the average positive than elsewhere. response was just 38% compared with APAC’s 50% and 49% in the Americas. When things are working well, it’s easy to become complacent, but employees notice when they’re not being ‘noticed’.home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 6. 6 | seven lessons for good leaders05prepare your One of the most telling results from the survey is the way employees feel Generation Y’s in the Americas feel the most positive about their ability because they are seen as having the most to learn. In practice, this may bepeople for about their boss’ ability to prepare to achieve future success. Half of ignoring the specific needs of older employees for the future. In every employees in this group (49%) say workers. Ensuring adequate trainingthe future region and across all generations, their manager has prepared them and support is in place for older employees feel that this is a task their well. The least positive group is Baby workers to keep pace with all kinds of leaders are not living up to. Boomers in EMEA—just 29% feel they change, not just technological change, are adequately prepared for the future is critical to keeping them engaged Older workers are far more likely to and put this down to the efforts of their in the workplace—as critical talent believe that their manager has failed to employer. shortages begin to really tighten, prepare them for future success, and you’re going to need to hold on to employees in the EMEA region are For younger workers, change is older workers longer, so this will be a far less satisfied with the preparation often easier because it is expected, key challenge for leaders in the short they’ve been given by their leaders and managers are focused on their to medium term. than those in other regions. development and training needs If employees are not well-prepared for future success, how will your organization execute its strategy?home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 7. 7 | seven lessons for good leaders06rethinK your Many employees are unhappy with the leadership culture of their older generations, but the results are remarkably consistent across all work environment’ also accounted for almost one in five negativeleadership organization, and this is a key factor in generations. Employees in EMEA assessments of a workplace to others. not recommending their workplace to are more inclined to describe theirculture others—if you want to build a strong organization’s leadership culture as It’s important to consistently remind employment brand, this is clearly inclusive than elsewhere, but very managers that poor leadership is something that must be addressed. similar proportions of people in all still the number one complaint of regions described their leadership employees. If leadership scores Less than half of employees describe culture negatively. With less than are low and feedback for particular the leadership culture of their half of employees feeling positive individuals or areas is poor, this will organization positively. While 48% of about the leadership culture in their likely be the main reason for attrition. employees feel that their leadership organization, it seems the way leaders Trying to avoid the obvious or hope culture is empowering or inclusive, the engage with staff is failing to resonate. that dissatisfied employees will leave rest feel it is authoritative, oppressive and be replaced by satisfied ones is or are unsure how to describe it. Leadership and management issues burying one’s head in the sand. Good topped the list of reasons why leadership must occur all the way Generation Y appears to feel slightly employees would not recommend up the line—and that means making more positive about the leadership their employer to others. The tough decisions when the evidence is culture of their organization than more general response of a ‘poor there to do so. A poor leadership culture is a key reason employees will fail to recommend their employer to others.home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 8. 8 | seven lessons for good leaders07understand Despite the criticisms people have of their leaders, more than half are most say it is because of a positive work environment, however, work reason they would highly recommend their employer to others.what you’re ‘highly likely’ to recommend their environment becomes less important Keeping Gen Y’s challenged and current employer to friends and as workers age, yet the nature anddoing right acquaintances. There is a slight challenge of the work becomes interested is a given. Achieving this decrease in this sentiment as workers significantly more important. For may not directly contribute to their age, yet overall the difference is Generation Y’s, just 16% felt the nature overall satisfaction, but NOT doing it relatively small. The biggest or challenge of the work they did was will certainly lead to dissatisfaction— difference is seen in EMEA, where the main reason for recommending it’s an expectation rather than a 55% of Generation Y’s are highly their employer to others, yet almost ‘nice-to-have’. For older generations likely to recommend their employer, one-quarter of Baby Boomers (23%) however, this is a differentiating factor yet just 46% of Gen Xers and 44% said this was the main driver of of employers—to keep them in the of Baby Boomers say they would recommendations. workplace for longer, employers will do the same. need to think outside the square Compensation was the lowest rated in keeping the nature of the work When asked what drives employees issue for employees of all age groups, that their experienced staff conduct to recommend their employer, with just 5% saying this was the main challenging and interesting. It’s not all bad news for leaders, so figure out how to capitalize on your strengths.home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 9. 9 | seven lessons for good leadersconclusion If “management is doing things right and leadership is doing the right things”, what exactly are these ‘right things’? How do we know when we’re doing them and when we’re not? The latest findings from the 2011 Kelly Global Workforce Index show that leadership culture and practice is failing to fulfill employees’ needs and expectations—and for companies looking to strengthen their employment brand, this is a clear opportunity. The way we learn to lead seems doomed if organizations are simply leaving the process up to existing managers. With such consistent poor feedback from employees globally, it’s time for organizations to take this issue to heart and find solutions. the seven practices that employees themselves are asking leaders to change are: 1. Forget experience, focus on vision: find and develop people who can convey a strong sense of vision and direction rather than promoting people based on age or experience. 2. Understand the generational differences & promote natural connections: the way the generations lead and respond are different—no matter who’s leading who, this needs to be top of mind to avoid conflict. 3. When dissatisfaction is high, act: don’t sweep negative feedback under the carpet and wait for it to go away. If leadership is contributing to attrition, it won’t change unless you address the leadership behaviors. 4. Recognize and reward what’s working: employees who are excelling don’t necessarily need large bonuses, but they do need you to notice. 5. Prepare your people for the future: ensure ongoing training and development is appropriate right across people’s career, regardless of age. 6. Rethink your leadership culture: lead by example and show you mean what you say. 7. Understand what you’re doing right: capitalize on your strengths and share these good practices broadly. Strategic execution is dependent on your people, and without the right leadership, change will continue to be a burden rather than an opportunity. Employees themselves offer the best insights into what’s working and what’s not, so ask them and then be ready to act.home 01 forget 02 educate 03 dissatisfaction 04 recognize 05 prepare 06 rethinK 07 understand conclusion get the experience, about is high and reward your people your leadership what you’re full report focus on vision differences what’s worKing for the future culture doing right
  • 10. This ebook is extracted from Leading by Example. Why Managers are Failing to Create Strong Employment Brands. DoWNloAD youR free coPy toDAy.About the AuthoRKRIStIN SuPANcIch is vice president and general manager of canadianoperations for Kelly Services. Kristin holds a bachelor’s degree in communicationsfrom the university of california-San Diego.About the Kelly GlobAl WoRKFoRce INDex™the Kelly Global Workforce Index is an annual survey revealing opinions about work and theworkplace from a generational viewpoint. Approximately 97,000 people from the Americas, APAcand eMeA responded to the 2011 survey with results published on a quarterly basis. Kelly Serviceswas the recipient of a Marcom Platinum Award in 2010 and a Gold Award in 2009 for the KellyGlobal Workforce Index in the Research/Study category.About KellyKelly Services, Inc. (NASDAQ: KelyA, Kelyb) is a leader in providing workforce solutions.Kelly® offers a comprehensive array of outsourcing and consulting services as well as world-classstaffing on a temporary, temporary-to-hire and direct-hire basis. Serving clients around the globe,Kelly provides employment to more than 530,000 employees annually. Revenue in 2010 was$5 billion. Visit www.kellyservices.com and connect with us on Facebook, linkedIn, & twitter. exit