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Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation
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Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation

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In the midwest 30% of domestic potable water is used outdoors. Most of this water is used for landscape irrigation and overwatering is the single greatest cause of plant death. It has been estimated …

In the midwest 30% of domestic potable water is used outdoors. Most of this water is used for landscape irrigation and overwatering is the single greatest cause of plant death. It has been estimated that 60% of outdoor water use is wasted. Proper plant selection and design can create a water conserving landscape that is beautiful and functional. Native plants and plants adapted to the local climate can save 20% to 50% of outdoor water use. In this webinar you will learn how combining proper plant selection with good soil management practices, and education can significantly reduce outdoor water use

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
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  • 1. Sustainable Landscape Design for Water Conservation by Tom Barrett ● Green Water Infrastructure
  • 2. 30% of household water use is used outdoors (in the Midwest)
  • 3. waterwasted wastedwater water wasted wasted water
  • 4. It Starts with Soil
  • 5. less than 1% runoff
  • 6. Compacted Soils Without Top Soil
  • 7. ADD ORGANIC MATTER 7% TO 12%
  • 8. Native Plants
  • 9. Practical Turf Areas
  • 10. Natural Look
  • 11. Grasses & Sedges Yellow Fox Sedge Carexbrachyglo ssa 1’-2’ Brome Hummock Sedge Carexbromoides 1’ Frank’s Sedge Carexfrankii 1’-2’ Meadow Sedge Carexgranularis 1’ TextText Courtesy of Fischer Design
  • 12. Grasses & Sedges Fox Sedge Carexvulpinoid ea 1’-2’ Tufted Hair Grass Deschampsiacaespito sa 1’ - 2’ Reddish Bulrush Scirpuspendulus 3’-4’ Prairie Dropseed Sporobolusheterolepis 1’-2’ Courtesy of Fischer Design
  • 13. Wild Flowers Blue Flag Iris giganticaerulea 1’-2’ May-June Marsh Milkweed Asclepiasincarnata 3’-4’ July-Aug Autumn Sneezeweed HeleniumautumnaleL. 3’-4’ Sept-Oct Monkeyflower Mimulusringens 2’-4 ’July-Aug
  • 14. Trees Black Maple Acer nigrum 60-70’ tall Shagbark Hickory Caryaovata 60-80’ tall Hackberry Celtisoccidentalis 60-80’ tall Thornless Honey Locust Gleditsiatriacanthosf. inermis 40 -70’ tall
  • 15. Larger Shrubs Indigo Bush Amorphafrutico sa 6-15’ tall Gray Dogwood Cornusracemosa 8-10’ tall StaghornSumac Rhustyphina 15-25’ tall Prairie Willow Salix humilis 6-712’ tall
  • 16. Low Growing Shrubs Leadplant Amorphacanesce ns 2-4’ tall New Jersey Tea Ceanothusamericanus 3-4’ tall Bush-Honeysuckle Diervillalonicera 3-5’ tall Sweet-fern Comptoniaperegrina 2-64 tall
  • 17. Water Contrary to popular wisdom plants will not extend roots from dry soil into moist soil
  • 18. Soil Probe
  • 19. ALTERNATE SOIL PROBE
  • 20. Alternate Water Sources
  • 21. Rain Water
  • 22. Gray Water
  • 23. HVAC condensation • 15 gallons of water per hour. • 360 gallons of water per day. • 2,520 gallons of water per week. • 10,000 gallons of water a month.

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