Online Curb Cuts - AUCD Presentation

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A presentation abou the importance of designing universally accessible online and distance courses, aimed specifically at those involved in higher education.

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Online Curb Cuts - AUCD Presentation

  1. 1. Online Curb Cuts: Access, Diversity and Inclusion through Universal Design<br />TINA PASSMAN, Ph.D. <br />University of Maine<br />
  2. 2. The content and format of this presentation includes:<br />1. Overview of 508 compliance and principles of Universal Design in Higher Education<br />2. Presentation and discussion of the legal, theoretical/pedagogical and practical implications of these ideas in building online learning communities<br />
  3. 3. 3. Checklist of 508 compliance factors and UD<br />4. How this preplanning and these principles address the changing demographics of our HE population<br />
  4. 4. 5. Discussion of the importance of socially responsive and responsible teaching practices in the furtherance of the democratic ideal of inclusive civic communities<br />6. Q & A <br />Short bibliography of resources<br /> <br />
  5. 5. Universal Design<br />SHOULD IT BE DRIVING ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING?<br />
  6. 6. Ramps & Curb Cuts<br />Does this represent all we need to know about Universal Design and Access? <br /> <br />
  7. 7. Ramps & Curb Cuts<br />Does it tell us anything about inclusion? <br /> <br />
  8. 8. When will this be taken for granted?<br />When does this become taken-for-granted? <br />
  9. 9. 508 Compliance<br />In1998, Congress amended the Rehabilitation Act to require Federal agencies to make their electronic and information technology accessible to people with disabilities. Inaccessible technology interferes with an individual's ability to obtain and use information quickly and easily. <br />
  10. 10. Purpose of 508<br />Section 508 was enacted to eliminate barriers in information technology, to make available new opportunities for people with disabilities, and to encourage development of technologies that will help achieve these goals. <br />
  11. 11. Purpose of 508<br />The law applies to all Federal agencies when they develop, procure, maintain, or use electronic and information technology. <br />
  12. 12. 508 and Institutions of Higher Education<br />Under Section 508 (29 U.S.C. ‘ 794d), agencies must give disabled employees and members of the public access to information that is comparable to the access available to others.<br />
  13. 13. 508 and Institutions of Higher Education<br />Academic Institutions are required to ensure that students, faculty, staff and visitors have access to information and services that is comparable to access available to others.<br />
  14. 14. GAO reports more students with disabilities in higher education<br />Students with disabilities represented nearly 11 percent of all postsecondary students in 2008, according to a federal survey. Moreover, this population appears to have grown, based on selected federal and state data. Government Accounting Office (GAO) summary<br />
  15. 15. GAO reports more students with disabilities in higher education<br />Also, in 2008, students with disabilities were similar to their peers without disabilities with regard to age, race, and the schools they attended. <br />Students reported having a range of disabilities in 2008, and the distribution of disability types had changed since 2000. Government Accounting Office (GAO) summary<br />
  16. 16. Government Accounting Office (GAO) summary<br />Schools also anticipate facing challenges in supporting two growing populations of postsecondary students: veterans with newly acquired disabilities and students with intellectual disabilities.<br /><ul><li>Friday, October 30, 2009, http://media-dis-n-dat.blogspot.com/2009/10/gao-reports-more-students-with.html</li></li></ul><li>Universal Design and 508<br />The principles of Universal design, when applied to teaching and learning, address 508 compliance and provide good, inclusive and accessible to teaching and learning environments for all stakeholders<br />
  17. 17. Universal Design and Higher Education<br />COURSES, TECHNOLOGY, AND STUDENT SERVICES ARE TYPICALLY DESIGNED FOR THE “AVERAGE” STUDENT <br />
  18. 18. BUT…<br />UNIVERSAL DESIGN IN EDUCATION PROMOTES THE CONSIDERATION OF PEOPLE WITH A BROAD RANGE OF CHARACTERISTICS IN THE DESIGN OF ALL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS AND ENVIRONMENTS. <br />
  19. 19. Universal Design in Education<br />GOES BEYOND ACCESSIBLE DESIGN FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES TO MAKE ALL ASPECTS OF THE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE MORE INCLUSIVE<br />
  20. 20. More inclusive for ALL people<br /><ul><li>STUDENTS
  21. 21. PARENTS
  22. 22. STAFF
  23. 23. INSTRUCTORS
  24. 24. ADMINISTRATORS
  25. 25. AND VISITORS </li></ul>WITH A GREAT VARIETY OF CHARACTERISTICS<br />
  26. 26. These characteristics include those related to gender, race/ethnicity, age, stature, disability, and learning style.<br />
  27. 27. An educational strategy whose time has come<br />Universal Design is responsive to 21st Century Educational needs and realities …<br />
  28. 28. Universal Design Responds to<br />CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS OF BOTH LEARNERS AND TEACHERS<br />A MORE SOPHISTICATED UNDERSTANDING OF THE LEARNING PROCESS THROUGH NEUROSCIENCE<br />
  29. 29. UD Responds to<br />A DEEPER CONCERN FOR ACCESS OF ALL TO A DEMOCRATIC AND “QUALITY” EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE<br />REINFORCEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL ACCESS THROUGH LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL STATUTES<br />
  30. 30. Universal Design Principles<br />
  31. 31. Universal Design Principles<br />AS APPLIED TO ONLINE INSTRUCTION<br />
  32. 32. Core Concepts<br />Universal Design<br />
  33. 33. 1. Plan from the start<br />BY ANTICIPATING AND PLANNING FOR THE DIVERSE NEEDS OF POTENTIAL USERS DURING THE DESIGN PROCESS, THE RESULTING PRODUCT OR OUTCOME WILL BETTER SUIT THE NEEDS OF ALL USERS<br />
  34. 34. WHEN THIS CONCEPT IS APPLIED TO EDUCATION, ALL USERS – INCLUDING INSTRUCTORS – HAVE A BETTER EXPERIENCE<br />Plan for all users, don’t retrofit<br />
  35. 35. A Brief Reminder<br />Accommodation<br />Universal Design<br />
  36. 36. 2. Equitable Use<br />The design of your course is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities. It is accessible and fair to all. <br />
  37. 37. “Equitable Use” is determined by the question of “Who Belongs?”<br />
  38. 38. Equitable Use<br />In terms of online teaching, this translates into using accessible technology <br />and limiting the number of tools a student is required to have and use.<br />
  39. 39. 3.Flexibility in Use<br />Your design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities. <br />
  40. 40. For online teaching this means:<br />Being aware of and providing for multiple formats<br />Captioning all audio material<br />
  41. 41. For online teaching this means:<br />Annotating images, including powerpoint presentations<br />Knowing the accessibility features of your course management software<br />
  42. 42. 4. Simple and Intuitive<br />The design of your course is easy to understand, regardless of the user's experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level. <br />
  43. 43. For online teaching this means:<br />You use software that gives clear, intuitive directions for use. <br />
  44. 44. Simple and Intuitive<br />Online courses should use consistent icons, terminology, and format. <br />Simpler is always better. <br />
  45. 45. 5. Perceptible Information<br />YOUR DESIGN COMMUNICATES NECESSARY INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY TO THE USER, REGARDLESS OF THE USER'S SENSORY ABILITIES. <br />
  46. 46. Perceptible Information<br />Captions are provided for videos<br />alternative assignments are available when video or visual information is presented <br />texts always accompany audio material<br />
  47. 47. Perceptible Information<br />Alt tags are used or there is a text alternative for images.<br />
  48. 48. 6. You are available<br />STUDENTS KNOW HOW TO CONTACT YOU IN MULTIPLE WAYS <br />AND THAT YOU ARE AVAILABLE TO ADDRESS INSTRUCTIONAL QUESTIONS<br />
  49. 49. You Are Available<br />You connect students with each other and with outside resources, such as the Students with Disabilities office and Writing Center. <br />
  50. 50. Reminder<br />Often, distance students do not know that they are entitled to accommodation and help readily available to on site students.<br />
  51. 51. 7. Feedback and Modification<br />YOU CREATE A FEEDBACK LOOP, <br />AND <br />YOU MODIFY YOUR DESIGN AND CONTENT-DELIVERY BASED ON STUDENT EXPERIENCE.<br />
  52. 52. Feedback and Modification<br />You assess your course design and whether your students are having a successful learning experience using multiple means <br />
  53. 53. You incorporate what you learn <br />This “closes the loop” and results in incremental improvement<br />In ALL areas of your course<br />
  54. 54.
  55. 55. These principles can be used in all online educational environments<br />Online training<br />Online workshops<br />Online conferencing<br />Online meetings<br />Any online delivery of information<br />
  56. 56. Who are the stakeholders?<br />WHO BENEFITS FROM USING UNIVERSAL DESIGN IN HIGHER EDUCATION?<br />
  57. 57. When we talk about creating a true learning community<br />DO WE REALLY MEAN IT WHEN WE SAY THAT EVERYONE BELONGS?<br />
  58. 58. This is the current challenge for Higher Education<br />As we move into the 21st century<br />

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