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Patient     ConfidentialityTraining which will assist in theprevention of HIPAA violations          Tina Norris
Promulgate the monetary consequences of violating                          HIPAA1 violation                       30 viola...
Complying with HIPAA• Hospitals, physicians, and their business  partners must ensure that all HIPAA privacy  and security...
What every healthcare leadershould know about HIPPA privacycompliance: PRIVACY COMPLIANCE PROTOCOLS
Efforts should be focused on high-risk areas such as (1) information access management, (2) access control, and (3) imper...
 Business associate agreements  must be reviewed in order to  verify that business associates  accept the direct HIPPA  o...
 All healthcare leaders must  provide HIPAA training and  appropriate monitoring to  confirm continuing compliance  (With...
 Privacy safeguards include (1)  ensuring that all documents  containing PHI are shred before  their disposal and (2) ens...
 Institute restrictions on which  application and module within  that application a user can  access, despite the user’s ...
 For more information on HIPAA  privacy policies, go to  www.tulane.edu/counsel/upco/  privacy-policies.cfm. and/or to  w...
What every healthcare leadershould know about HIPAAsecurity compliance:SECURITY COMPLIANCE PROTOCOLSFOR ENSURING EHRS/HIES...
 Be aware that the first  documents an investigator is  likely to want to see are the risk  assessment and resulting poli...
 Draft a risk assessment analysis  by which protocols for the  physical, administrative, and  electronic security of ePHI...
 Tighten internal compliance  procedures;
 Extensively conduct regular  training of all employees;
 Train also the employees of all  provider-partners;
 Have signed privacy agreements  with all employees;
 Extensively conduct regular  audits to ensure compliance  (Sarrico & Hauenstein, 2011).
 For more information on  drafting a risk assessment  analysis pursuant to HIPAA, go  to  www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa  ...
References• Sarrico, C., & Hauenstein, J. . (2011). Can EHRs  and HIEs get along with HIPPA security  requirements? . hfm ...
References• Withrow, S. . (2010). How to avoid a HIPAA  horror story. hfm (Healthcare Financial  Management), 64(8), 82-88...
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Norris, t week 1 discussion 2

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  • “Willful neglect” signifies lack of correction within 30 days, and carries the maximum fine, which might have to paid by the violator (s), including business associates, rather than necessarily by the employer (Withrow, 2010).
  • Transcript of "Norris, t week 1 discussion 2"

    1. 1. Patient ConfidentialityTraining which will assist in theprevention of HIPAA violations Tina Norris
    2. 2. Promulgate the monetary consequences of violating HIPAA1 violation 30 violations$100 per victim at minimum fine $1.5 million per victim at maximum fine
    3. 3. Complying with HIPAA• Hospitals, physicians, and their business partners must ensure that all HIPAA privacy and security provisions are not only adopted, but are completely current as well (Withrow, 2010).
    4. 4. What every healthcare leadershould know about HIPPA privacycompliance: PRIVACY COMPLIANCE PROTOCOLS
    5. 5. Efforts should be focused on high-risk areas such as (1) information access management, (2) access control, and (3) impermissible disclosures of PHI;
    6. 6.  Business associate agreements must be reviewed in order to verify that business associates accept the direct HIPPA obligations, and indemnify the hospital and physicians for any HIPAA violations;
    7. 7.  All healthcare leaders must provide HIPAA training and appropriate monitoring to confirm continuing compliance (Withrow, 2010).
    8. 8.  Privacy safeguards include (1) ensuring that all documents containing PHI are shred before their disposal and (2) ensuring that doors to medical records departments, including file cabinets, are kept locked and that which personnel are authorized to have the key or passcode is limited (Sarrico &Hauenstein, 2011).
    9. 9.  Institute restrictions on which application and module within that application a user can access, despite the user’s having established his/her ID at logon (Sarrico & Hauenstein, 2011).
    10. 10.  For more information on HIPAA privacy policies, go to www.tulane.edu/counsel/upco/ privacy-policies.cfm. and/or to www.nyu.edu/its/policies/#hipa a. (Withrow, 2010).
    11. 11. What every healthcare leadershould know about HIPAAsecurity compliance:SECURITY COMPLIANCE PROTOCOLSFOR ENSURING EHRS/HIES COMPLY
    12. 12.  Be aware that the first documents an investigator is likely to want to see are the risk assessment and resulting policy and procedural protocols for the physical, administrative, and electronic security of ePHI (Wieland, 2010).
    13. 13.  Draft a risk assessment analysis by which protocols for the physical, administrative, and electronic security of ePHI will be devised (Wieland, 2010).
    14. 14.  Tighten internal compliance procedures;
    15. 15.  Extensively conduct regular training of all employees;
    16. 16.  Train also the employees of all provider-partners;
    17. 17.  Have signed privacy agreements with all employees;
    18. 18.  Extensively conduct regular audits to ensure compliance (Sarrico & Hauenstein, 2011).
    19. 19.  For more information on drafting a risk assessment analysis pursuant to HIPAA, go to www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa /administrative/securityrule/rad raftguidanceintro.html (Wieland, 2010).
    20. 20. References• Sarrico, C., & Hauenstein, J. . (2011). Can EHRs and HIEs get along with HIPPA security requirements? . hfm (Healthcare Financial Management), 65(2), 86-90. Retrieved October 19, 2011, from EBSCOhost.• Wieland, J. B. . (2010). Liability and the lab. HIPAA: The new enforcement culture. MLO: Medical Laboratory Observer, 42(11), 42. Retrieved October 19, 2011, from EBSCOhost.
    21. 21. References• Withrow, S. . (2010). How to avoid a HIPAA horror story. hfm (Healthcare Financial Management), 64(8), 82-88. Retrieved October 19, 2011, from EBSCOhost.
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