Fiction genre planning
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    Fiction genre planning Fiction genre planning Presentation Transcript

    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities Outcomes You will need Short: a book of very short stories (OUP 0192781480) and a book of detective stories, e.g. Detective Stories chosen by Philip Pullman (Kingfisher 0753402343). Start reading Detective Stories on Monday outside the literacy hour, and continue throughout the unit, reading a different story each day. Week1Monday Main focus: understanding concept of fiction genre. 8. Read and discuss personal reading with others, including in pairs & groups. 1. Use the techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas. 8. Compare how writers of different genres present experiences and use language. Start the session in a bit of a fluster! Catastrophe! A single page has fallen out of each of the books in my fiction collection! Pin up on board & work together with the chn to read each extract aloud (see plan resources) – discuss what genre of anthology the chn think each extract could have come from (encourage discussion with the person sat next to them) & match to the possible front covers provided! Discuss how they made their decisions & what gave them the clues to the genre. Which of your books would be their choice of a ‘top read’? Are they mad on science fiction? Can’t get enough of animal stories? Or an expert on all things humorous? Launch the discussion into their favourite genres to read. Easy Working with teacher, chn discuss their reading preferences. Give each child time to speak and encourage good listening. Then each child creates a book flag (see plan resources). Can they give a good reason for their choice of genre? TD Medium/Hard Chn work in pairs or threes to discuss their own reading. Try to group chn who like the same genre. They should discuss what types of fiction they prefer reading & talk about a book in this genre that they have really enjoyed. Each group then makes a book flag – a flag with the names of books they have enjoyed reading & a few phrases, which describe & sell the genre to others (see plan resources). Display like bunting! Children can: 1. Begin to understand the concept of a fiction genre. 2. Discuss own fiction reading. 3. Identify a favourite genre & give reasons. © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities OutcomesWeek1Tuesday Main focus: reading short stories. 8. Read and discuss stories with others. 7. Appraise a text deciding on its value and quality. 7. Understand how writers use different structures to create impact. Teach this second: Read the first 2 stories in Short! Ghosteses & Brainless. Which do chn prefer? What genre is each tale? Think back to yesterday’s range of genres. Ghost story/traditional tale. Read the start of In the Back Seat – what genre does this look like? Domestic fiction. Read on & it turns into horror! Explain that we shall read a range of genres today. Teach this first: Show the book Short! by Kevin Crossley- Holland. Explain that this is a book of short stories – very short stories in fact! Enlarge the ‘Contents’ page, showing all story titles. Can chn tell what genre a story is likely to be from its title only? How? Which ones are dead giveaways? Which are we not sure about? Discuss the power & effect of words chosen for a title. Easy/Medium/Hard Provide copies of the book Short! and/or photocopies of lots of the stories. Chn work in pairs/threes to read a selection of the stories and decide to which genre each story belongs. Explain that the publisher of this book has been asked to reprint it, showing the stories grouped by genre. Chn record their decisions on the provided outline, set out as the ‘Contents’ table for the new version of Short! (see plan resources). TD to support Easy, reading stories aloud to them where necessary. Children can: 1. Understand the concept of fiction genres. 2. Read a selection of short stories and identify genres. © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities OutcomesWeek1Wednesday Main focus: Comparing stories from different genres. 1. Use techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas. 2. Make notes when listening. 8. Compare how writers of different genres present experiences or use language. 9. In non-narrative, establish balance and maintain viewpoint. 10 Use paragraphs in writing. Ask chn to think back to the different stories they have now read or heard from Short! Can they suggest 2 of these stories that are completely different and belong to different genres? In what ways could we compare our chosen stories? One at a time, invite chn to open an envelope & read out a ‘Spot The Difference’ prompt card (see plan resources – copy & put one in each envelope). Before sticking up on board, discuss how each card’s advice can help us make a detailed comparison of the stories. Read Ouch (p24) & then A Bit of Commonsense (p48). They both belong to the traditional tale/fable genre, but how do they differ? Point out that Ouch is written largely using dialogue (direct speech). Whereas ABoC is written mainly in prose, reporting what happened. Discuss difference it makes: dialogue gives an immediate feel, whereas a reported story gives more distance… Together, draw out the ways in which punctuation differs in these stories. (This sentence level work will relate to the punctuation prompt card at the start of the session.) Easy/Medium Provide copies of the book Short! and/or photocopies of lots of the stories. Chn choose 2 contrasting stories & work with a talking partner to discuss these, using the suggested headings (see plan resources). They then write a comparison, grouping points made using paragraphs. TD Hard Chn choose two short stories & compare, writing a comparison referring to the different genres. Their writing should be set out in clear themed paragraphs – each addressing one aspect. Children can: 1. Compare two short stories giving reasons for opinions. 2. Begin to relate story style to genre. 3. Use paragraphs to organise writing. Plenary Discuss chn’s comparisons. How does the genre affect the story? Point out that stories in different genres are written in different ways. Begin to recap on & establish features of different genres. Week1Thursday Main focus: Discussing ideas for short stories. 1. Use techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas & issues. 8. Read and discuss personal reading with others. 8. Consider how writers of different genres use language. Read back cover & preface of Short! What do chn think about the length of a story? Do all stories need to be long? How short can a story actually be? What must it include? Is there an ideal length? What might it depend on? What might short stories do that longer stories do not & vice versa? Display & read the shortest story from collection: Talk About Short. In one complex sentence, author sets the scene, a mood, hints of a character & throws in a mystery! Have a go at verbally creating a sense of intrigue in very few words – it’s extremely difficult! Explain that chn will be writing their own Short short story in their preferred genre – in no more than 150 words! Will they take the challenge? Time to share some ideas… Easy Chn discuss good story content and ideas for their short story with an adult. Oral stories should be kept simple… but something must happen or a problem/mystery introduced. (Needs adult) Medium/Hard Chn work in pairs with a talking partner to discuss good story content & ideas. It is helpful to discuss what can be ‘left out’ – e.g. setting detail, character development… TD extend Hard Children can: 1. Discuss with a partner ideas for their own very short story. 2. Be aware of the genre of the story they are planning.Plenary Turn down the lights, shut the curtains & gather in a circle to ‘try out’ chn’s ideas for short stories… Encourage chn to judge whether ideas will work… or need further development. Offer ideas to help one another in this oral planning stage. © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities OutcomesWeek1Friday Main focus: Planning a short story. 7. Understand how writers use different structures to create coherence & impact. 9. Set own challenges to extend achievement and experience in writing. 9. Use different narrative techniques to engage & entertain the reader. 11.Express subtle distinctions of meaning [in opening sentences]. Enlarge & display Who’s Who? Read aloud to the class and then ask a confident child to read it aloud a second time. What are the chn’s responses to this story? How does the content relate to the title? (Remind them that an effective, relevant title will be needed for their own stories.) Discuss the structure of this short story – annotate the copy to show the opening and how it quickly sets the scene, introduces character & launches the story. Talk about important lines to the story, e.g. ‘That’ll teach them, thought Jack…’ which give us a clue of what direction the story might be going & hint at what might happen. Jack is out to prove that his friends are silly believing in ghosts… so the twist in the tale is the question over the girl who was ‘drifting’. Was she a ghost or another of his friends tricking him? Discuss how the conclusion of the story ties up the building storyline. The structure of a short story needs to be tight and sharp… even more so than in a longer story – and this will be the challenge for them to recreate in their own stories! (especially in the maximum 150 words allowed!) Easy/Medium/Hard Chn plan and begin to sketch out their written short story. They should ensure that their story grabs the reader’s attention from the start, builds using a clear structure and has a convincing ‘middle’ (either involving a problem, mystery or something to be solved). Stories should be brought to a convincing ending – either one that involves a twist, shock or humour! (Endings will be looked at in more detail on Monday – when they will also get the chance to complete their writing and publish their Short! Creations) Children can: 1. Plan a very short story. 2. Use a simple story structure. 3. Be aware of story genre. Plenary Invite chn to read aloud their opening sentences/phrases to their short stories. Whose opening captures our interest immediately & has us waiting expectantly for the next line? Offer constructive criticism for making these ‘story launches’ even better! © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities Outcomes You will need to have read several Detective Stories for this week’s work. In particular you need to have read The Speckled Band by Arthur Conan Doyle. Week2Monday Main focus: Writing a short story. 7. Understand how writers use diff structures to create coherence & impact. 9. Set own challenges to extend achievement and experience in writing. 9. Use different narrative techniques to engage & entertain the reader. 12. Use ICT to present text. How important is the ending to a short story? Why? Return to some of the short stories shared from Short! last week and remind yourselves of how they ended. Do all short stories bring the narrative to a firm conclusion? Why is an element of intrigue, fun, the unexpected or even shock important in such stories? Using the provided copy (see plan resources), display and read aloud the short story Boo! with the ending removed. Ask chn for ideas of how they would end this story. Now display the provided alternative end lines for the story. In turn, discuss the different effect they have on the story/twist on the ending. Which do the chn like best & why? Which do they think is the actual ending of the story? Encourage chn to think carefully about the planned endings of their own short stories & the effects they achieve. Could they alter them for more impact? It’s not too late to make a change! We want the best! Easy/Medium/Hard Chn complete their short stories planned last week. They check that the total number of words does not exceed 150 and make sure that they have created an effective ending. Encourage chn to swap with a ‘checking partner’ to iron out any problems with clarity, punctuation or spelling. Children can: 1. Structure and write own very short story. 2. Be aware of story genre.Plenary Allow chn time to word-process their short stories and perhaps add a small illustration. Publish the stories as a new class book of Short! If possible, ask the chn to help group them by genre and create a ‘Contents’ table to reflect this. Week2Tuesday Main focus: Discuss features of detective stories. 8. Read extensively & discuss texts with others. 1. Use the techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas & themes. 8. Consider how writers of a particular genre present experiences and use language. Re-read the start of The Speckled Band by Arthur Conan Doyle (You must have read the complete story to the class already). Discuss what type of story this is – Detective fiction. Ask chn if they have read other detective stories to themselves. Which detective stories have they enjoyed hearing read to them (particularly by you)? Discuss & list classic features of this genre of fiction: detective (sometimes working under an alias) - often has a partner, a crime committed, various suspects, mysterious circumstances, all not as it seems, suspicious characters… something to be solved! Explain that these kinds of stories are often know as ‘Whodunnits?’ as obviously we have to work out ‘who done it’ – i.e. Who committed the crime? Have the chn ever watched a detective film or TV programme, such as a Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie, Poirot, Columbo, Murder She Wrote, Clue, The Pink Panther, etc? Discuss why this genre makes such good watching! We all like to think that we are amateur sleuths! Easy In response to hearing you read The Speckled Band, the chn write a simple email on the provided outline (see plan resources) to a Hollywood Film Director, explaining why this story is just the perfect theme for turning into a film! They should talk about the exciting elements of a detective story and why this will make great watching! (With adult help) Medium/Hard As for others, chn talk in groups, then write an email to a Hollywood Film Director extolling the virtues of turning The Speckled Band into a new film sensation! However, these groups would be expected to not only draw out the best features of detective genres, but make reference to specific scenes & characters from the story that they have creative ideas for. TD Children can: 1. Begin to identify features of detective stories. 2. Discuss in a group and make notes. 3. Structure and write an email to communicate information.Plenary Why not find out a little more about Sherlock Holmes & his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle? Take a virtual tour of the detective’s infamous study overlooking Baker Street, at the Sherlock Holmes Museum @ http://www.sherlock-holmes.co.uk/ - keep your eyes open for his deerstalker, calabash pipe, violin and magnifying glass! © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities Outcomes Week2Wednesday Main focus: Watch a film & make notes on its genre features. 2. Make notes when watching or listening for a sustained period and discuss how note- taking varies. 10. Use varied structures to organise text coherently, e.g. taking notes. Explain that today’s lesson will be watching a film version of a detective story. This can be any film you think suitable for your class (…but is probably determined by what you have access to! The local library is usually a good source.) Do check appropriateness of content & length & make sure you have watched it beforehand. Examples would include a Sherlock Holmes story (e.g. Jeremy Brett TV series), a Miss Marple or other Agatha Christie… or how about the new feature film Nancy Drew, which is targeted at this age range (launched in June 2007)? Remind chn of key features of detective fiction to look out for! Easy/Medium/Hard Invite chn to The Detective Club’s weekly showing of a detective film! Make it into a bit of an event by displaying a poster in the classroom when the chn come in that morning & distributing membership cards & tickets (see plan resources). Provide every child with the ‘Detective Club’ notebook page (and clipboard, if possible) on which they will be asked to make notes relating to the film’s detective(s), crimes, suspects and conclusion. Explain that all members of the Detective Club are required to share their expert opinions after all film showings… so they will need to take notes in order to create a written report in tomorrow’s lesson! Children can: 1. Identify features of detective fiction genre in a film version. 2. Make effective notes. Week2Thursday Main focus: Write a film review. 10. Structure, shape and organise text. 9. In non-narrative, express viewpoints. 11. Express subtle distinctions of meaning by constructing sentences in varied ways. Welcome back ‘Detective Club’ members! So… what did you think of yesterday’s film offering? Allow chn to share initial thoughts about the film as a whole, before guiding discussion into specific comments relating to film’s style, detective character, interest level of crime, originality, etc. Explain club members are experts in this genre, so the chn’s reviews will need to really draw out its key features. So how do we write a film review? Share the example (see plan resources). Discuss & annotate the sheet to draw out aspects of its layout, content, style and language used. Draw particular attention to specific sentences, discussing how the punctuation is crucial to helping us understand the way in which the writer wants us to interpret the meaning of the sentences. Easy Provide chn with a writing scaffold (see plan resources) in which they create a film review for the next edition of the ‘Detective Club Newsletter’. They should make good use of their notes. TD Medium/Hard On provided frame (see plan resources), chn compose a film review for the Detective Club’s Website. They make effective use of their notes, present a coherent & well-organised text & aim to use a range of sentence structures. Children can: 1. Write a considered film review. 2. Refer to features of the film genre. Plenary Swap reviews with other club members & read! Week2Friday Main focus: Discuss and plan a character. 7. Understand how writers use diff ways to create characters. 3. In group discussion, use a variety of ways to criticise constructively & respond. Explain to chn that, as ‘Detective Club’ members, they will try their hand at becoming an author & writing their own detective story… so we need to find out more about central ‘detective’ characters from world of detective fiction. Can chn name any famous fictional detectives? List on f/c, e.g. Sherlock Holmes, Sam Spade, Poirot, Inspector Morse, Inspector Clouseau, Miss Marple, Nancy Drew, Charlie Chan… Share info sheets about famous detectives (see plan resources). What can we find out about their character, creator & books they’ve starred in? What makes a good detective character? How does the author make them memorable & interesting? Do any of these have a partner? E.g. Sherlock Holmes & Watson, Inspector Morse & Lewis… note that their accomplice is never as ‘sharp’ as they are! Do the chn have ideas for a detective for their story? Easy/Medium/Hard Drawing on what they’ve learned about successful detective characters, chn create a character profile for their own detective character to star in their story - on provided frame (see plan resources). What will make their detective suit the part, solve the crime & stand out among the crowds? Children can: 1. Plan a detective character drawing on features of detectives in other examples of the genre. 2. Take part in critical discussions. Plenary Split chn into ‘talking partners’ to present & discuss new detective characters to one another. Are they able to make good, constructive, critical suggestions? Is their partner able to take criticism & respond appropriately? © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities Outcomes Continue your reading of good Detective Stories throughout this week’s work – the more examples the chn hear, the more their own writing will be inspired! Week3Monday Main focus: Plan a detective story. 9. Set own challenges to extend achievement & experience in writing. 7. Know how writers use diff structures for effect. 1. Use techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas. Recap on the key features of good detective stories… Ask chn how well they think they can build such features into their own detective stories? Have they started to think of a mystery that their newly created detective could be involved in? Present the following scenario & suggest most chn use it as a springboard for their own detective story: Their detective is called to the house of a famous person, who has had something of value stolen. There is no sign of a break-in, so it’s an inside job. There are 3 possible suspects… Talk about ways that the scenario could be adapted, but explain how helpful it is to start with a clear idea! Easy Chn start to plan their short detective story, using the grid provided (see plan resources). Encourage them to ‘think aloud’ whilst planning. (With adult help) Medium/Hard Chn plan own detective story on scaffold (see plan resource), by jotting down notes. They should consider how story plot builds & a good structure is achieved. TD Children can: 1. Discuss and begin to plan own detective story. 2. Use features & structure of detective story fiction. Plenary Chn talk through detective story plans. Discuss critically whether ideas are appropriate for the genre & will flow well into a narrative. Week3Tuesday Main focus: Begin to write own detective story. 9. Use different narrative techniques to engage reader. 9. Select words and language drawing on their knowledge of literary features. Read the openings of a range of detective stories from the collection. Which do chn like best & why? How do they differ in technique & style? Ask chn to consider how they will start their own stories. Share some ideas to assist. Now consider how the story might continue. How much dialogue would chn want to use? What key parts of story might dialogue occur in? E.g. Detective discussing suspicions, suspects being interviewed, the evidence being presented. Talk about effect that dialogue has on a story & its pace; suggest chn use a wise balance of narration & dialogue. Share list of ‘Detective Vocabulary’ (see plan resources) that may be useful in creating an authentic detective style. Easy/Medium/Hard Chn continue to work on their short detective story, making sure that they have a clear story plan. Today they will decide how to begin their story and then will start writing it. How will they set the scene, bring in their detective character and establish the puzzle? Will the detective have a partner – if so, what role will they take… maybe interviewing suspects? TD to circulate, question & advise Children can: 1. Start writing own detective story. 2. Draw upon features of detective stories read.Plenary Ask chn to describe one of their suspects. Do they sound suspicious? What characteristics could be added to make them more effective? Does their name suit the genre? Main focus: Write own detective story. 9. Use different narrative techniques to engage reader. Invite chn to read aloud stories so far. Do these introduce the story well? Can we visualise their detective… how does their character emerge? How do chn plan to continue writing? Focus on Enlarge & read first 2pp of It’s A Hard World. How is each paragraph connected to next one? Look carefully at purpose of each & find phrases Easy/Medium/Hard Chn continue writing their detective stories, making good use of narrative techniques to create the ‘middle’ of their stories & keep the plot moving forward. If able, chn should be writing in paragraphs to achieve the effects discussed. TD to support Easy, scribing where necessary Children can: 1. Use narrative techniques to engage their reader. © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities Outcomes Week3Wednesday 9. Select words and language drawing on their knowledge of literary features. 10 Use paragraphs. 11 Use correct punctuation. ‘middle bit’ – here we have to intro suspects & present reader with clues & ‘red herrings’. Share ideas for how to make this exciting & keep reader guessing. Chn must think how to move narrative on… that move the reader on, e.g. I got up to get away… Point out that paragraphs split up text, but can also increase suspense & make us want to read on. 2. Use paragraphs to split up text or create suspense. Plenary Ask chn from Hard group to read out the most exciting parts of their stories so far. Have they been able to use paragraphs for effect? Do ‘cliffhangers’ keep us waiting expectantly for what comes next? Offer constructive feedback. Week3Thursday Main focus: Write own detective story. 9. Use different narrative techniques to engage reader. 9. Select words and language drawing on their knowledge of literary features. 11 Use correct punctuation. 6. Use a range of appropriate strategies to proofread and edit. 12. Use ICT to present text effectively. Teach this second: Discuss what constitutes a good ending to a detective story. Have chn thought about how they will end their detective story? Will the plot reach a rewarding conclusion? Will the reader be satisfied that all aspects of the mystery are solved? Display copy of final 3 paragraphs of The Speckled Band, from ‘I had,’ said he…. (see plan resources). Discuss how many detective stories end with a monologue from the detective, explaining their reasoning for solving the crime. Who will say final sentence of their story? The detective, partner, criminal, narrator? Teach this first: With the child’s permission, enlarge a good example of a story that is being written well. Give lots of positive praise for what they have achieved so far. Model how we can read back our own writing & make corrections to punctuation, grammar & spelling to improve its clarity & ensure the story flows well. Point out effective examples of complex sentences & paragraphs. Easy/Medium Chn work hard to finish writing their detective story, using all the good techniques they have learned about detective fiction. Which words and phrases will they use to create an atmosphere, keeping the reader puzzled and interested? Finally, how will the ‘Whodunnit?’ be revealed and the story brought to a close? TD with Easy group Hard Chn complete their stories ensuring that their detective acts ‘in character’ throughout and especially that the end brings the plot to a satisfactory conclusion. Do the chn leave their reader wanting to read more stories about this fictional detective character? (Can they feel a sequel coming on…!!) Children can: 1. Complete their own detective story. 2. Devise an appropriate ending for their story. 3. Begin to proofread and edit. Hard 4. Use approp characterisation techniques. 5. Present written work using ICT. Plenary Once chn have completed their stories, you will want to publish these as a class collection. Find time for chn to word process their stories if possible and publish these as ‘The Detective Club’s Anthology of Detective Stories’. You could also record the chn reading their stories, for others to playback and listen to. Can they add mystery and menace to their voices? Week3Friday Main focus: Recapping on main features of detective fiction genre. 7. Understand how writers use different As a fun way to bring this block to a close, introduce some well-loved, whacky – but nevertheless young detectives from the cartoon scene! Show the chn an episode of the Scooby Doo cartoon series. Before you start, ask chn to look out for key features that they have learned about detective fiction genre & structure… interesting openings, setting the scene and problem, characters of the detective(s), clues & red herrings and finally solving the crime & explaining how they Easy/Medium/Hard Chn take notes to complete the differentiated ‘Scooby Doo Detective Spotter’ sheets (see plan resources). They make notes about key parts of the Scooby Doo episode, drawing out its detective elements, crime to be solved, clues, suspects, evidence, conclusions, etc. You might like to PAUSE the episode at a crucial point just before the ending, to see whether the chn have solved the mystery & can explain their reasoning to ‘Whodunnit?’ Children can: 1. Draw out & revise the main features of detective fiction. 2. Understand the importance © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Objectives Text/Speaking/Listening Word/Sentence Independent group activities Outcomes structures to create coherence & impact. 2. Make notes when watching & listening for a sustained period of time. worked it out (watch out for the use of explanations & flashbacks at the end!). Through writing their own detective stories they will have realised how important a clear structure is to such a story. Talk through the provided spotter sheets to complete while watching… of clear structure in a narrative. Plenary Celebrate the success of your solving of the ‘Scooby Doo’ mystery (…if it hadn’t been for those pesky kids!) with some well-deserved Scooby snacks, whilst plotting a simple ‘story map’ of the episode’s detective narrative structure on the board! Scroll down for Success Criteria and book and website lists Success criteria for the block – these should be selected & adjusted to match the specific needs of the class being taught. Easy Medium Hard • Know that there are different genres of fiction & recognise some features. • Talk about own reading preferences. • Compare two different stories. • Comment on short stories. • Know that the structure of a story is important. • Share ideas as part of a group. • Start to make critical comments. • Create a simple story plan, following a guided structure. • Write a detective story following own plan. • Use some features of detective fiction. • Include an interesting event in own story. • Create a suitable detective character. • Construct clear sentences. • Choose apt & interesting words. • Express ideas in non-narrative text. • Make simple notes as reminders of information. • Check own work against provided criteria. • With help, use ICT to present text. • Recognise different genres of fiction & identify key features. • Discuss own reading preferences. • Compare short stories with reasoning. • Give opinions about short stories. • Recognise the importance & effect of clear narrative structure. • Make useful contributions to group discussion. • Participate in critical discussions. • Plan a story, using a clear narrative structure & plot-line. • Write detective story making good use of plan. • Make good use of features of detective fiction. • Use different narrative techniques for interest. • Create a convincing detective character. • Construct sentences in varied ways. • Select words for appropriateness & effect. • Express ideas clearly in non-narrative text. • Make clear notes of key information, while listening in a sustained way. • Confidently identify different genres of fiction & know their key features. • Give reasoning for own reading preferences. • Carry out effective comparison of short stories. • Appraise short stories effectively. • Know that clear narrative structure creates impact & coherence. • Make useful contributions to group discussion. • Play an active part in critical discussions. • Create an effective story plan, taking into consideration good plot development. • Write detective story making good use of plan. • Write in authentic & convincing detective style. • Use diff narrative techniques with confidence. • Create a convincing detective character. • Use varied sentence structure for effect. • Select words & language for literary effect. • Express viewpoints clearly in non-narrative text. • Make effective notes of key information, © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres • Use strategies to check coherence of own work. • Use ICT independently to present work. varying note-taking to suit task. • Use reliable strategies to proofread & edit. • Use ICT effectively to present & publish work. © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks
    • Literacy Year 6: Autumn – Weeks 1-3 Narrative: Unit 1A Fiction Genres Books: Short! A Book of Very Short Stories by Kevin Crossley-Holland (OUP 0192781480) Detective Stories selected by Philip Pullman (Kingfisher 0753456362). This book has now been re-titled under the name Whodunnit? Utterly Baffling Detective Stories by Philip Pullman (Kingfisher, ISBN: 978-0753415306) or another collection of suitable detective stories. The Speckled Band by Arthur Conan Doyle (included in Philip Pullman’s collection) Websites http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detective_fiction Very useful background information on features of detective stories & famous fictional detectives. All you need to know! Highly recommended reading to get you up to speed on this genre! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventure_of_the_Speckled_Band Useful information about the background & summary of this legendary detective story. Also has a link to enable you to download & listen to an ‘Old Time Radio’ retelling of the story. http://www.sherlock-holmes.co.uk/ Website for the Sherlock Holmes Museum, 221B Baker Street, London (of course!) Go on a virtual tour of Holmes’ famous study; find out more about his author & creator. http://www.funny-games.biz/sherlock.html Join Sherlock Holmes in this fun investigation into ‘The Case of The Silver Earring’. Do you have what it takes to be a real detective? Play the game and find out! http://www.filmsite.org/mysteryfilms.html Helpful list of examples of Detective films available - ensure that you select one with suitable content. http://nancydrewmovie.warnerbros.com/ Home page for the new Nancy Drew movie – premieres in cinemas in June 2007. The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the ‘Links’) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best of Hamilton Trust’s knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links. © Original plan copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users Y6 N Unit 1A – Aut – 3Weeks