Trend Analysis In Social Tagging   An Lis Perspective   Ecdl2007 (Tin180 Com)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Trend Analysis In Social Tagging An Lis Perspective Ecdl2007 (Tin180 Com)

  • 762 views
Uploaded on

http://tin180.com - Trang tin tức văn hóa lành mạnh

http://tin180.com - Trang tin tức văn hóa lành mạnh

More in: Business , Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
762
On Slideshare
762
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • It emerged in popular practice ca. 2003, at the same time as social networking Web sites, and constitutes an important part of the interactive, democratic nature of Web 2.0 in that it places the responsibility for the classification of Web resources squarely in the hands of users
  • Blip.tv podcasting and videoblogging site Shadows is a bookmarking Simpy tagging and social bookmarking Bubbleshare : photos Blinklist: bookmarking Diigo: social annotation Taggly: social bookmarking Slide: photos
  • Searching media-specific sites and services images, videos, slides etc. DeliSearch uses Yahoo Search API. Users can then search over just the bookmarked pages or the domains they reside on. Integration: This is a trend that is becoming prominent that web applications integrate folksonomies within their applications commercial and academic sites Music discovery: combining social networking with a high-tech music recommendation system, MyStrands—installs software on the PCs of its members that keeps track of the music they buy and listen to via iTunes or Windows Media Player. Then, that data is compared to the playlists of other members, and when patterns emerge, MyStrands recommends songs members might like. Specific social groups: flickr, mySpace and Facebook for families; museums, libraries and career-minded people such as salespersons, human resource workers Educators are beginning to explore Web 2.0 technologies to facilitate online and distance education. (Shank, 2006), for example, discusses the “collaborative tools teachers can use to facilitate online learning, focusing on blogs, social bookmarking and podcasting Interoperability in this context may have different implications: systems interoperability, semantic interoperability or organizational; also user generated vs. librarians’ generated metadata and any automatic indexing Automatic Expertise tagging and how we can take advantage of folksonmoies to detect and tag various interests and expertise
  • How people search social networks; Jon Kleinberg looks at how an employee in a large company searches his or her network of colleagues for expertise in a particular subject … or a user in a distributed IR or federated search setting traverses a network of distributed resources connected by links that may not just be informational but also economic or contractual KM: “some intra- and inter-community communications and exchanges, utilization of the tacit ‘community knowledge’ for the welfare of the larger society Hidden social network: Tang and Yang the social roles that people take in the online community affect the regulation and their perception in participating in the “design” of their community How user use non subject tags, regularities in user activity, tag frequencies, kinds of tags used, bursts of popularity in bookmarking and a remarkable stability in the relative proportions of tags within a given URL. collaborative tagging users exhibit a great variety in their sets of tags; some users have many tags, and others have few .(Delicious) How grammar or the semantic study of tags can Affective aspect of social tagging: for instance terms such as cool, toread, fun to show their emotion Philosophical analysis of the semantic web and social tagging systems : focusing on information organization frameworks and functions such as controlled vocabularies, social tags and boundary infrastructures there is little overlap among tags, automated indexing terms, and controlled vocabularies (this depands on what types of social tagging systems, academic or entertainment; our data suggest that tags are more similar to automatic indexing than to controlled vocabulary indexing,
  • Search behaviour of specific user populations (academics, students, professionals, the elderly, children, youth, etc.) This suggests that social tagging and folksonomies are still in their infancy, both as practices and as subjects of scholarly examination and debate. The work of Gottlieb & Dilevko (2003), which examined the bookmarking habits of persons in the financial services industry, might be one of the important antecedents of such research.
  • Search behaviour research methodologies can be applied to the academic study of social tagging and folksonomies. Browsing vs. searching : interaction models developed by Saracevic, Ingwersen, Belkin., Bates, Kulthau and Ellis can be extended to study various social tagging systems and users’ interaction with them -- Facetag: how the flat keywords space of user-generated tags can be effectively mixed with a richer faceted classification Electronic search services such as OPACs, digital libraries, content management systems, library portals and virtual learning environments The issues that we have been struggling for decades in the area of terminology interoperability will have a place in the social tagging research landscape Relevace of tags or content
  • The choice of facets in the FaceTag system is based on the CRG (Classification Research Group) theory

Transcript

  • 1. Trend Analysis in Social Tagging: An LIS Perspective Ali Shiri Assistant Professor School of Library and Information Studies University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 2. Social tagging
    • The classification of resources
    • “ by the use of informally assigned, user-defined keywords or tags” (Barnes, 2006; Barsky & Purdon, 2006)
    • “ using free-text tags, unconstrained and arbitrary values” (Tonkin, 2006).
    • User-generated tags, metadata, keywords, terms.
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 3. Social tagging Social bookmarking Social classification Social annotation Social networking Social tags Folksonomies Collaborative tagging Ethnoclassification Free tagging Collaborative classification 6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 4. Social Tagging Environment 6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007 Photo sharing Slide sharing Videoblogging and sharing Social networks Academic bookmarking Bookmarking
  • 5. Objective
    • The aim of the present study was to identify and categorize social tagging trends and developments as revealed by the analysis of library and information science scholarly and professional literature.
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 6. Method
    • The abstracts and selected full text of approximately 100 articles
    • Content analysis of abstracts and full papers
    • Thematic categorization of the issues and subjects discussed
    • Databases searched:
      • Library and Information Science Abstracts,
      • Library Literature and Information Science Fulltext,
      • Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts(LISTA),
      • Academic Search Premier,
      • Emerald Fulltext
      • DLIST (Digital Library of Information Science and Technology)
      • E-LIS
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 7. Results: Trends
    • Two general trends:
      • Technological Innovations and Applications
      • Research
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 8. Technological innovations and applications
    • Improved searching (DeliSearch)
    • Integration
    • Music discovery (MyStrand)
    • Social networks for specific social groups
    • Pedagogical and andragogical applications
    • Functionality and interoperability
    • Folksonomies for intranets
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 9. Research
    • Searching social networks (Kleinberg, 2006)
    • Relating social networks to knowledge management (Neelameghan , 2006)
    • Discovering hidden online social networks (Tang and Yang, 2006)
    • Using social tagging systems (Golder & Huberman, 2006)
    • Linguistic issues: grammar and lexicon of tags (Tonkin, 2006)
    • Affective and emotional issues (Kipp, 2007)
    • Philosophical and epistomological (Campbell, 2006; Tennis, 2006)
    • Comparison of social tags and controlled vocabularies (Lin et al; 2006; Kipp, 2006)
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 10. Some observations
    • Most of the literature discovered and examined is of a popular or professional nature
    • The crux of debate in the professional library literature: whether the folksonomic model is a passing fad or an important trend that could impart a new richness in search capabilities, particularly in the OPAC.
    • How and in what ways Web 2.0 and social tagging enhance user experience.
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 11. Some observations (cont.)
    • A strand of research is emerging that examines the interoperability of social tagging systems, led by writers such as Fox (2006) and OCLC and demonstrated by DeliSearch
    • A growing body of work on the application of social tagging systems in various information search and retrieval systems such as OPACs, bibliographic databases, search engines, library portals and digital libraries
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 12. Research areas
    • Search, interaction and tagging behaviour
    • Combined use of KO systems and techniques and social tagging tools ( FaceTag )
    • Interoperability, cross-searching and browsing and mapping of social tagging systems and KOS systems
    • Linguistic and discourse analysis of tags
    • Cultural and phenomenological perspectives
    • Cognitive and affective issues in social tagging
    • User interface features
    • Social classification benefits in the context of other electronic search services
    • Information retrieval (relevance)
    6th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, 11th ECDL Conference, Budapest, Hungary September 21, 2007
  • 13.
    • Questions?
    • Thank you !
    Ali Shiri [email_address]
  • 14.