Education
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  • As you will know we have had a major change of government in the UK this year. Co-operatives have traditionally been the preserve of the left in the UK but that dichotomy is rapidly disappearing as the new right-of-centre coalition is out recruiting amongst the co-operative and social enterprise sectors to find people and structures which will deliver its vision of what they call the ‘Big Society’. They are promising: “to put more power and opportunity into people’s hands. We want to give citizens, communities and local government the power and information they need to come together, solve the problems they face and build the Britain they want. We want society – the families, networks, neighbourhoods and communities that form the fabric of so much of our everyday lives – to be bigger and stronger than ever before. Only when people and communities are given more power and take more responsibility can we achieve fairness and opportunity for all.” They have recognised that this vision has a great deal in common with the values and principles of the co-operative movement and, as this quote from David Cameron makes clear, they are keen to jump onto the co-operative bandwagon.
  • As you will know we have had a major change of government in the UK this year. Co-operatives have traditionally been the preserve of the left in the UK but that dichotomy is rapidly disappearing as the new right-of-centre coalition is out recruiting amongst the co-operative and social enterprise sectors to find people and structures which will deliver its vision of what they call the ‘Big Society’. They are promising: “to put more power and opportunity into people’s hands. We want to give citizens, communities and local government the power and information they need to come together, solve the problems they face and build the Britain they want. We want society – the families, networks, neighbourhoods and communities that form the fabric of so much of our everyday lives – to be bigger and stronger than ever before. Only when people and communities are given more power and take more responsibility can we achieve fairness and opportunity for all.” They have recognised that this vision has a great deal in common with the values and principles of the co-operative movement and, as this quote from David Cameron makes clear, they are keen to jump onto the co-operative bandwagon.
  • The UK Co-operative College was established 1919, and in its early days it ran residential courses in social/economic subjects for adult learners and a wide range of retail and management courses for co-operative employees Almost immediately students were attracted from around the world and in particular from the British colonies who sent many of their government co-operative regulatory staff to be trained in the UK. Today we continue this function, running training courses around the UK, rather than in a central residential venue, for people from all parts of the movement. Additionally we l ook after the UK movement’s heritage including the Toad Lane museum in Rochdale - the site of the first successful co-operative shop - and a vast archive, including 3,500 of Robert Owen’s original writings. Our international work continues. We are currently working in 20 countries and have, for example, been working extensively in east and southern Africa over the past two years helping the co-operative colleges in 8 countries to improve their capacity to meet there local needs.

Education Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Education Co-operatives: learning communities 1. National education contextJon O’Connor 2. Co-operative principles & backgroundCo-operative College 3. Co-operative AcademiesLondon & SE Area Manager 4. Co-operative Free Schools 5. Co-operative TrustsLondon Co-operativeParty 6. Co-operative Education PartnershipsSaturday 14th July 2012 7. Q&A and discussion time
  • 2. The Co-operative College Facilitates and advises co-operatives across many sectors Responds to requests from the education sector for adviceDesigns co-operative structures for the new education context Schools TheCo-operative Society National representative body for co-operative schools
  • 3. Co-operative education:a movement with momentum The number of co-operative schools  September 2008 1  September 2009 27  September 2010 98  September 2011 171  September 2012 368  September 2015 ????
  • 4. London & South East co-operative education developments Co-operative School Trusts Co-operative Academy Trusts Co-operative Free School/LA Partnership projects Co-operative Special School Partnerships Co-operative education improvement partnerships
  • 5. National educationcontext 1. Significant legislation 2. New school structuresA radical education policy 3. Harsh economic climateA radical shift in economicclimate 4. Reductions in resourceA radical shift in educationdelivery 5. Shifting Responsibilities
  • 6. 70 years on from the 1944 Act….Government policy is committed tosystemic change … A mixed economy of schools 2000+ academies by end 2012 And …the policy will have systemic consequences New school brands & chains  A fragmented schools system Secondary driven revolution  QA and EO regulation issues Primary schools a key target  Changes in LA leadership role  Continuing strain on LA resources Radical change radical results  New drivers in education services  A mixed economy of providers
  • 7. From today’s Guardian:Secret Head Teacher blog Anxiety is the killer and this has been a bumper year. Too many colleagues on long-term sick; one collapsed while taking an inspector round the school subsequently downgraded from outstanding to good. Three days in hospital. "The only solution is structural" for schools in any kind of trouble we hear. Academy chains prowl around the borders of the county waiting for Ofsteds big beast to move away from a carcass. Heads arent running scared but they are drinking too much red wine. Panic does battle with fatalism. Do we jump before we are pushed or leave our fortunes in the hands of the fast disappearing local authority?
  • 8. In this climate, the challenge forLocal Authorities is…  To manage 30%+ revenue cuts 2011-14, impacting on Strategic and longer term planning capacity Educational experience, expertise and historic relationships Proactive & responsive provision for vulnerable: SEN, safeguarding To respond pragmatically to change, as requiring A revised relationship with schools Challenge & Support for governing bodies Remodelled support services using a client-based approach
  • 9. In this climate, the challenge forschools is…  To absorb responsibilities from the local authority Filling the gap left in strategic and longer term planning Compensating for loss of expertise and historic relationships Sustaining provision for vulnerable: SEN, safeguarding  To respond pragmatically to change, as requiring A revised relationship with external bodies: LA; Ofsted A new role for governing bodies: sharper & impact focused Procurement of support services in a new market-place
  • 10. Why develop co-operative modelsfor education provision?  To respond positively to the new education landscape  To offer diversity in delivery  To embed key values and a shared ethos within the system  To provide a positive governance model for trusts and partnerships  To empower and engage communities and stakeholders
  • 11. A new policy toreinvigorate the public sector “We will support the creation and expansion of mutuals, co-operatives, charities and social enterprises, and enable these groups to have a much greater involvement in the running of public services” The Coalition Programme for Government May 2010
  • 12. Another new policy toreinvigorate the public sector "We will create a new presumption – backed up by new rights for public service users and a new system of independent adjudication – that public services should be open to a range of providers competing to offer a better service” February 2011
  • 13. Co-operative  Self help  Self responsibilityCore values  DemocracyA globally shared set of values &  Equalityprinciples since the first co-operative:Rochdale Pioneers in 1844  Equity1 billion co-operative members  Solidarityworldwide and 9.8 million members inthe UK alone.Co-operatives provide retail, funeral,insurance, agricultural, industrial &  Honestymanufacturing services  OpennessA history of community & co-operativeeducation, in schools and colleges  Socialleading up to the 1944 Act responsibilityA shared commitment to raising  Caring for othersexpectations & achievement throughdemocratic engagement
  • 14. communities Co-operative Build on common core• co-operative principles Control in the hands of• those with the greatest interest in success Focus on practical• necessity and real work Use low-key business-like• management styles Show the global appeal• of integrity & credibility
  • 15. Culture shift Working from within Working from grass roots
  • 16. Trustee AppointmentsForms Trustwith legal DFE Funding Agreementpowers tomanage Land & asset lease Academy School(s) Sponsor leadership or Converting School Governors Provide Oversight (or Directors) of Basic Academy operating model
  • 17. Members Co-operative Academy Trust Parents & Carers Staff characteristics Learners Community Local Co-operative Alumni to & Partner Organisations k po ac res ort b nd Members elect rep representatives to All Members/Stakeholder ForumForumappoints to Board of Governors Co-operative Academy Board of Trustees
  • 18. Co-op Academy structure
  • 19. Co-operative Free Schools•Co-operative principles•Strategic new provision•Community engagement
  • 20. Guardian 13.07.12Riverside Co-operative Free School The Riverside Co-operative will be one of the biggest free schools when it opens in the east London development of Barking Riverside, catering for around 1,800 children when at full capacity. Serving the Barking Riverside community – up to 11,000 new homes Planned with the local authority in response to basic need: shortage of places
  • 21.  The Foundation provides a legal entityCo-operative Trust  Creating a bar to external change  Maintaining a connection with theSchools local authority, as a maintained school  Holding major assets in trust  Sustaining core values and ethosWhy do heads and governors  The Partnership extends opportunitiesconsider it a good move?  To affirm community commitment  To state a choice of character  To develop local provision  To offer local accountability4.Principled partnership  To engage stakeholders in decisions5.Defensive structure  The Trust is similar to community schools:  Governing Body composition & role  Staffing conditions unchanged  Supported by Unions & Associations
  • 22. Co-operative trust model Partner 1 Partner 2  Engages key Trust stakeholder groups through core members membership from school(s) Partner 4 Partner 3  Forum/Council provides a Forum or Council vehicle for accountability Governing Body Governing Body and high level consultation School 1 School 2 Membership including Parents Staff Learners Community Organisations Individuals
  • 23. Co-operative EducationImprovement Partnerships Vehicle for larger group of  Education partnership models education partners  Harlow Education Consortium Working alongside local  Newham Partnership Working authority service provision  Merton education partnership Designed to support strategic goals for raising attainment  Cabinet Office Pilot public service mutuals Company Limited by Guarantee, mutual or  Eg 3BM (Hammersmith & Fulham/ charitable characteristics Westminster/Kensington & Chelsea Not for profit, values driven  LA- inspired, school-led collaborative Reinvesting any surplus in solutions education projects  E.g. Sandwell, Wolverhampton
  • 24. Co-operative Education 2012Changing the landscape 21000 schools 3200 sec, 17000 primary, 1957 Academies - 200 in May 2009 Largest Local authorities shrinking rapidly Almost 400 schools and partners are now involved in Co-operative education
  • 25. Co-operative College Schools Co-operative Society Further information www.co-op.ac.uk www.school.coopwww.co-op.ac.ukwww.youngco-operatives.coop