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YOUR MARKET ANALYSIS AND MARKETING PLAN

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  • 1. YOUR MARKET ANALYSIS AND MARKETING PLAN Presented by: Cynthia Franklin Senior Associate Director, Berkley Center Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 2. What’s the Difference?
    • Customers
    • Competition
    • Competitive Advantage
    • Critical Success Factors
    • Critical Risks
    • Potential Sales/Market Share
    • Product Positioning
    • Price
    • Placement
    • Promotion
    • Sales Process
    • Partnerships
    • Market Analysis Describes Targets (Who & Why)
    • Marketing Plan Describes Tactics (How)
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 3. Why Segment the Market?
    • All firms have limited resources. They can’t be all things to all people. They must decide where to focus their limited time, money and human capital so that they yield the greatest return.
    • That means identifying “right-sized” pieces of the market to go after.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 4. What Makes a Market Segment Promising?
    • Measurable: possible to determine size
    • Significant: large enough to be profitable
    • Recognizable: distinct enough so that you can identify its members
    • Compatible: with your venture’s mission, strengths, ability
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 5. Ways to Target the Market
    • Geographic
      • local, regional, national, international
    • Demographic
      • B2C: gender, age, income, education, ethnicity
      • B2B: revenues, # employees, industry
    • Psychographic
      • values, lifestyles, hobbies
    • Behavioral
      • benefits sought, usage rate
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 6. Tips for Identifying Market Segments
    • Secondary Research
      • Databases & Reports
      • Newspapers & Magazines
      • Trade publications and Trade shows
    • Ask
      • Industry players
      • Potential customers
      • Suppliers
    • Observe
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 7. Make Sure Your Product Is Compelling
    • What problem will you solve? What need/desire does your product address?
    • How will your product make their lives better, easier, happier?
    • Know what your customers are currently doing:
      • Going to the competition
      • Using another solution
      • Nothing
    • Know how satisfied they are with existing options.
    • How hard will it be to get them to change what they’re currently doing?
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 8. Who Is My Competition?
    • Competition = everybody who’s after the same consumer dollar you are.
    • Direct Competitors
    • Indirect Competitors
    • Possible New Entrants
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 9. How Stiff Is the Competition?
    • Analyze your competition.
    • Look for marketplace gaps you can fill.
    • Develop a competitive matrix.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 10. Your Competitive Landscape Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies Honda Civic Honda Civic LX Toyota Prius Toyota Corolla XLE Your Product Mpg 37 28 44 32 ? 5-Yr Fuel Cost $6,500 $8,500 $5,500 $7,500 ? Tax Rebate $525 0 N/A 0 ? Price $23,270 $18,430 $24,170 $19,330 ?
  • 11. Creating a Competitive Advantage
    • Having a Sustainable Competitive Advantage allows you to distinguish your product from the competition’s. It’s what gives you a significant edge. The basis of your SCA must not be able to be duplicated or imitated and is not substitutable.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 12. Creating a Competitive Advantage
    • Tangible Items
      • Intellectual property rights
      • Exclusive license
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 13. Creating a Competitive Advantage
    • Intangible Items
      • Superior Product/Brand
        • Quality
        • Selection
        • Availability
      • Operational Excellence
      • Innovation Leadership
      • Intimate Customer Relationships/Experiences
      • Cost Advantage
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 14. Your Critical Success Factors
    • CSF = What absolutely must happen in order for you to be successful. In other words, “If I don’t do X, then my venture will fail.”
    • Identify five or fewer CSFs.
    • CSFs will be driven by your industry, business model, target markets, etc.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 15. Critical Risks
    • Investors aren’t looking for risk-free businesses; there is no such thing.
    • What they are looking for is evidence that you know where potential trouble lies and that you’ve thought of contingency plans.
    • Be forthright in your assessment of risk.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 16. Examples of Common Critical Risks
    • Competitor response to your entry into the market.
    • Sales projections below expectations.
    • Unable to find suppliers.
    • Inability to find a distributor.
    • Inability to get shelf space.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 17.
    • Your Go-to-Market Strategy
    The Marketing Plan Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 18. Your Product
    • Core Product: Primary benefit
    • Tangible Product: Features
    • Augmented Product: Enhances purchase exp.
    • Communicated Product: Branding
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 19. Pricing
    • How much can you charge?
    • Will your products be bundled?
    • Will you be offering discounts, leasing, financing, coupons, etc.?
    • Avoid competing on price—for most, it’s not a winning strategy. Customers who shop based on price tend not to be loyal.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 20. Placement: Getting It to the Customer
    • Direct to your customer
      • Online
      • Own physical location
    • Indirect to your customer
      • Through retailers
      • Through wholesalers
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 21. Promotion: Getting Their Attention
    • Common Tools
      • Advertising (print, broadcast, online)
      • Direct mail
      • Email/website
      • Social networking
      • Trade shows/events
      • Cold calling/telemarketing
      • Face-to-face
      • Public relations
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 22. Choosing Your Marketing Mix
    • Factors to consider
    • Choose media your target segments use most.
    • Take into account how complex your sale is (big ticket, new technology, multiple decision makers).
    • Use media appropriate for your product.
    • Target your message so that your customer receives it when they’re most receptive.
    • Use an assortment of tactics to send a unified message.
    • Be focused.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 23. What Happens When Customers Raise Their Hands?
    • What systems do I need in place to handle customer inquiries and process orders?
      • Fulfillment
      • Shipping
      • Brochures/Sales literature
      • Website
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
  • 24. Partners
    • Seek out partners for all phases of the Go-To-Market Strategy.
    • Collaborate with potential “competitors”.
    Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies