See Yearbook for year 2.doc.doc

1,647 views
1,460 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,647
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

See Yearbook for year 2.doc.doc

  1. 1. SCHOOL OF MARKETING FACULTY OF BUSINESS Certificate in Marketing DT303/2 Year Two YEARBOOK 2007-2008 1
  2. 2. Table of Contents Introduction from the Head of Marketing Studies Academic Calendar Course Structure Programme content and student workload Course Aims & Objectives Modules: Semester One Marketing Practice Data Collection & Analysis Micro Economics Management Accounting for Marketing Communications and the Organisation Options: Choose One French Supply Chain Management Management of ICT Semester Two Marketing Planning Marketing Research Applications Macro Economics International Marketing Marketing Communications Options: Choose One French Data-Driven Marketing Business-to Business Marketing Continuous Assessment Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions & Entering for your Examinations DIT Regulations on the Use of Computers DIT School of Marketing Style Guide DIT Organisation Structure 2
  3. 3. Introduction from the Head of Marketing Studies Firstly, congratulations on successfully completing the first year of your Certificate in Marketing & welcome back after the summer break. This final year offers you many challenges, both in terms of the course content and in your future plans on completion. In particular, your final results will determine the options open to you at DIT: a strong performance in your assessments & examinations will provide you with the opportunity to progress to Degree level courses. This document is your guide to your second year programme. Everything concerning the academic dimension of your course is contained here. Take your time to read through each section and make sure that you are familiar with the regulations and requirements. In particular, all your subjects are detailed here, with the content, assessment methods and reading lists provided. If there is anything else that you wish to find out or something that you are unsure of, please contact myself or any of the team on the programme. Wishing you an enjoyable and rewarding year. Roger Sherlock, Head of Department of Marketing Studies, DIT Faculty of Business, School of Marketing. 3
  4. 4. Certificate in Marketing Year Two Academic Calendar 2007/2008 Week Week No. Details SEMESTER ONE 10/9/07 September 2007 17/09/07 1 Lectures Commence 24/09/07 2 October 01/10/07 3 08/10/07 4 15/10/07 5 22/10/07 6 29/10/07 7 Reading Week November 05/11/07 8 12/11/07 9 19/11/07 10 26/11/07 11 December 03/12/07 12 10/12/07 13 Lectures End 17/12/07 Christmas 24/12/07 Christmas 31/12/07 Christmas January 2008 7/01/08 14 Semester Examinations 14/01/08 15 Semester Examinations 21/01/08 SEMESTER TWO 28/01/08 1 Semester Two Lectures Commence February 04/02/08 2 111/02/08 3 18/02/08 4 25/02/08 5 March 03/03/08 6 10/03/08 7 17/03/08 Easter Break 24/03/08 Easter Break 31/03/08 8 Lectures Resume April 07/04/08 9 14/04/08 10 21/04/08 11 28/04/08 12 Lectures End 05/05/08 13 Reading Week May 12/05/08 14 Examinations Commence 19/05/08 15 26/05/08 02/06/08 June 09/06/08 16/06/08 Results Published Please Note: These dates should not be considered binding. They are indicative only and are subject to change. They are supplied now on a best-estimate basis to assist students making provisional outline plans for the coming academic year and for the summer of 2008 4
  5. 5. Course Structure Modules: ECTS Modules: ECTS Semester One Credits Semester Two Credits Marketing Practice 5 Marketing Planning 5 Data Collection & 5 Marketing Research 5 Analysis Applications Micro Economics 5 Macro Economics 5 Management Accounting 5 International Marketing 5 for Marketing Communications and the 5 Marketing 5 Organisation Communications Options: Choose One Options: Choose One French 5 French 5 Supply Chain Management 5 Data-Driven Marketing 5 Management of ICT 5 Business-to Business 5 Marketing Total ECTS Credits 30 30 Note: the course is fully semesterised and modularised. This will require that you treat the exams in January (semester one) as FINAL exams as they will count for your overall grade and classification. 5
  6. 6. Programme content and student workload Modules: Lecture Tutorials Exam Reading Total ECTS Hours Workshops (Hrs) Self-Directed Hours Credits Semester Three Case-studies Learning Industry Hours speakers Marketing Practice 24 6 2 68 100 5 Data Collection & 24 6 2 68 100 5 Analysis Micro Economics 24 6 2 68 100 5 Management Accounting 36 6 2 56 100 5 for Marketing Communications and the 24 6 2 68 100 5 Organisation Options: Choose 1 French -NA- 60 2 38 100 5 Supply Chain 24 6 2 68 100 5 Management Management of ICT 24 6 2 68 100 5 Total Learning Hours 180 44 16 560 600 30 Lecture Tutorials Exam Reading Total ECTS Hours Workshops (Hrs) Self-Directed Hours Credits Semester Four Case-studies Learning Industry Hours speakers Marketing Planning 24 6 -NA- 70 100 5 Marketing Research 24 6 2 68 100 5 Applications Macro Economics 24 6 2 68 100 5 International Marketing 24 6 2 56 100 5 Marketing 24 6 2 68 100 5 Communications Options: Choose 1 -NA- 60 2 38 100 5 Data-Driven Marketing 24 6 2 68 100 5 Business-to Business 24 6 2 68 100 5 Marketing Total Learning Hours 600 30 6
  7. 7. Course aims and objectives On successful completion of this programme, students will be expected to have developed knowledge, skill and know-how for immediate employment or progression to further studies. The aims and objectives for this programme are expressed in terms of learning outcomes required at level 6 as defined by the NQAI. Knowledge: Breadth Demonstrate specialised Knowledge in a broad area of marketing theory and practice, both in the context of the functional area and in regard to the integration of marketing with the other core business functions. Have a critical awareness of current marketing theory, and be able to evaluate theory in relation to its application to marketing and business practice. Understand the role of marketing in overall corporate decision-making, and be able to apply tools and techniques. Knowledge: Kind Some theoretical concepts and abstract thinking, with significant underpinning theory. Have a specialist expertise in the optional subjects chosen. Demonstrate the ability to research specific elements of marketing activity through the integrated research project. Know-how and Skill - Range: Demonstrate comprehensive range of specialize skills and tools Be able to interpret and appraise the implications of a changing business environment. Be able to assimilate and interpret numerical information in the form of statistical, financial and quantitative data. Demonstrate and apply the skills and techniques of word processing, Excel, Powerpoint, SPSS, Geoconcept, Clementine, Access, and research databases. Selectivity: Formulate responses to well defined abstract problems Demonstrate a level of knowledge of the tools and techniques necessary for the effective operational marketing activity. Demonstrate the analytical skills and decision-making ability necessary to work as part of a specialist functional team. Acquire new knowledge and skills, using research techniques and self-directed learning. Competence: Context Act in a range of varied and specific contexts involving creative and non routine activities; transfer and/or technical or creative skills to a range of contexts. 7
  8. 8. Be able to analyse a changing marketing situations and propose strategic and tactical solutions. Have an insight into the international and inter-cultural dimensions of marketing. Be able to prepare marketing plans and programmes, and integrate them with other functional plans and programmes. Competence: Role Exercise substantial personal autonomy and often take responsibility for the work of others and/or for allocation of resources; form, and function within multiple complex and heterogeneous groups Be able to use leadership skills, team building and team working, in order to develop synergies and enhance sources of competitive advantage. Be competent in the operational elements of marketing practice: campaign planning, resource allocation, budgeting, evaluation and appraisal. Be dynamic team members, with a strong awareness and experience of the issues involved the dynamics of group interactions. Be strong and confident communicators, with a range of presentation skills and an awareness of the cultural aspects of corporate and personal communication. Competence: Learning to Learn Learn to evaluate own learning and identify needs within a structured learning environment; assist others in identifying learning needs Have developed the capacity for self-directed learning through projects and self study that will facilitate further academic and professional development as part of a commitment to life- long learning. Competence: Insight Express an internalized, personal world view, reflecting engagement with others Have insight into the consequences of marketing decisions for stakeholders and society. Be empowered to contribute as marketers, to raising the standards of practice and professionalism within their chosen industry. Critically reflect on the function of marketing and business in society in the context of ethics and social responsibility. 8
  9. 9. Modules: Semester One Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Marketing Practice Module author: Mary Lawlor Module Description: This module addresses how marketing is typically managed in different profit and not- for- profit contexts. It requires the student to engage with the theory and implementation of a marketing campaign in a variety of sectors. It presents the student with the opportunity to examine best practice in Irish and international marketing campaigns. An introduction to marketing scope and challenges in each sector will be given. Teams of students are required to examine, evaluate and present real-life, current marketing campaigns from each of the sectors. Module aim To familiarize the student with the marketing challenges in a variety of business sectors. To give the student the opportunity to present a current integrated marketing campaign for a brand from a consumer, business to business, service or not-for-profit sector. The campaign should represent best practice and, if possible, include an international dimension. To enable the student to bring all the marketing elements together from planning, implementation and control of a campaign. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be expected to: Analyse a market situation for a brand Evaluate market potential for a brand Discriminate between communication and media alternatives for a brand Develop a fully integrated brand campaign for a product or service in a profit or not-for- profit sector. Learning and Teaching Methods: Active and experiential learning will be encouraged to enable the student to draw on their linguistic, logical and interpersonal intelligences. Formal Lectures Student presentation and class discussion. 9
  10. 10. Module content: Services Marketing The Irish and International service industry. Importance for the Irish economy. The key characteristics of services. The challenges for marketers in service businesses. Managing service quality and customer satisfaction. Organization structures and marketing strategies for sevices. Business to Business Marketing Vital differences between the new B2B and B2C models. Organizational buying. Buying situations. Systems buying and selling. Participants in the buying process. Major influences on buying decisions. The purchasing/procurement process. Institutional and government markets. Business-to-business marketing communications Nonprofit Organizations Marketing Scope, challenges and development of the Nonprofit sector. Branding. Marketing programmes. Social Marketing: The marketing of ideas. Fundraising, Arts marketing, Education, Healthcare marketing. Volunteer support and management. Public sector marketing. Module Assessment Continuous Assessment (group) 50% Students are required to select, critically evaluate and present a marketing campaign from different sectors of marketing. The campaign should aim to address the following areas of marketing. Campaign Format Market Situation/background 5 Branding 5 Positioning and product proposition 5 Objective 5 Segmentation and Target Market Profile 5 Communications Strategy 10 Media plan 5 Budget 5 Results 5 Semester Examination 50% 10
  11. 11. Essential Reading: Sargeant Adrian, Marketing Management for Non profit organizations, second edition, Oxford University press, 2005 Blythe, Jim and Alan Zimmerman, Business to Business Marketing Management, Thomson, 2005 Carroll, John (2002), Microsoft Project in easy steps Web references, journals and other Journals International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing. 11
  12. 12. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Marketing Research 2: Data Collection & Analysis Module author: Joy Redmond Module Description: This module builds on a foundation of the Marketing Research and presents students with a thorough grounding in primary data collection methods. Module aim The aim of this module is that students will gain a thorough understanding of the process of primary data collection. They will become aware of a wide variety of primary research approaches and techniques and gain practice in application of some techniques through group and individual project work. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be expected to: Demonstrate how researchers develop and rationalize research objectives Design a qualitative research instrument Design a questionnaire Design an appropriate sampling procedure for their chosen topic within the Dublin region Implement both qualitative and quantitative fieldwork Prepare data for analysis Prepare and present primary research findings. Learning and Teaching Methods: While much of the subject matter will be presented using lectures, the essential thrust of this course is to focus on the student's own primary research needs and to demonstrate how professional researchers have approached these issues. Where available, video presentations and guest lecturers will illustrate the techniques as they are currently practiced. Weekly tutorials will be given to apply the theory in practical exercises along with workshops to assist in their assessment requirements. Workshops on questionnaire design, sampling will be undertaken, as will trial interviewing. 12
  13. 13. Module content: Primary Research objectives and rationale Sampling theory and practice Quantitative Research Designs and Analysis Questionnaire Design Measurement and Scaling Data preparation for analysis Introduction to SPSS Survey, Observation and Experiments Fieldwork and Quality Control Qualitative Research Designs and Analysis Focus groups Projective Techniques Depth Interviews Reports and their presentation Module Assessment 100% Continuous Assessment (Individual) Research objectives mini project 10% Qualitative research instrument design 10% Quantitative research instrument design 20% Sampling Design 10% Fieldwork 10% Primary research report 40% Essential Reading: Malhotra, N, D. and Birks D., Marketing Research: An Applied Approach, 2nd European Edition, Financial Times Management, London 2003. Supplemental Reading Various chapters of the following texts are useful for particular sections of the course Domegan, C. and Fleming, D., Marketing Research in Ireland, 2nd Edition, Gill and Macmillan, Dublin 2003. Zikmund, W., Exploring Marketing Research, 8th Edition, Thomson, Ohio 2003. Churchill, G. and Brown, T., Basic Marketing Research, 5th Edition, Thomson, Ohio 2004. Website Web links to further online resources are contained in the website designed for this class group. 13
  14. 14. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Management Accounting for Marketing Module author: Alice Luby ACMA MSc Module Description: Management Accounting for Marketing Students gives a broad overview of the management accounting techniques available for use in planning, decision making and control. The module focuses on the role of management accounting in preparing and presenting financial information within an internal management information system. Module aim The aim of this module is to develop an understanding of management accounting principles, models and techniques available to effectively manage dynamic and diverse business situations. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to:  Describe the role of management accounting within an organisation  Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and elements of cost within an organisation  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of overheads and apportion overhead cost  Calculate the full cost of a product or service  Demonstrate an understanding of cost behaviour and demonstrate its relevance in decision making  Describe the relationship between cost – volume and profit and present the results of break-even analysis  Apply the processes of relevant costing and marginal costing in decision making  Describe the budgetary control process  Apply budgeting principles to present accurate budgets and control statements Learning and Teaching Methods: This module will be delivered through the medium of lectures, in a context that is relevant for marketing students, supported by an electronic learning environment. The learning and teaching methods employed will include, discussion, problem-solving exercises, case studies and self-directed learning. 14
  15. 15. Module content: Description of syllabus content covered in module: 1. An introduction to management accounting 2. Elements of cost, including direct and indirect cost 3. Apportioning overhead cost 4. Calculating the full cost of a product or service 5. Modern approaches in product and service costing and the control of overhead cost 6. Cost behaviour, fixed, variable, step and semi variable cost, including the separation of semi variable components 7. Cost – volume – profit analysis, including breakeven charts 8. Relevant costs for decision making 9. Marginal costing for decision making 10. The budgetary process 11. Producing master budgets 12. Budget control statements Module Assessment Continuous assessment (Individual) 30% End of year examination 70% Essential Reading: Atrill & McLaney (2005) Management Accounting for Decision Makers, FT Prentice Hall, 4th Edition Supplemental Reading: Luby A (1999) Cost and Management Accounting Learning through Practice, Gill and Macmillan Web references, journals and other Journals of the major accountancy bodies and other journal articles as directed by the lecturer www.accaglobal.com/students www.iasb.org www.icai.ie www.cimaglobal.com 15
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. Pre-Requisite Co- ECTS Module Module Title Modules Requisite Credits Code code(s) Modules code(s) 5 Microeconomics Module author: Siobhan Mc Carthy Module Description: This module is an introduction to micro economic theory and some of its applications. Module aim The aim of this module is to develop a basic competence in microeconomics. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to demonstrate an understanding of: How a product market functions through the price mechanism and equilibrium analysis Economic Costs and Profit Structure of Firms and the output level that minimises cost and maximises profit The market structures, including, perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition within which products are produced The reasons for state intervention such as externalities, monopoly power and inequality in a market economy Market Distortions such as price controls. taxations and quotas Learning and Teaching Methods: A variety of methods will be used including lectures, tutorials and use of Web CT. There will be a mix of formal teaching, class discussion, problem-solving and case studies. Module content: Introduction Introduction to Economics as a social science. Concepts of scarcity, choice and opportunity cost. Methods of analysis and presentation. Microeconomics Demand, supply and the determination of equilibrium price. Elasticity. Maximum and minimum prices. Costs of production in the short and long run. Profit maximisation. Models of market structure. Market failure and externalities. Government intervention and regulation. Inequality and poverty. Taxes, benefits and the redistribution of income. The market for factors of production 17
  18. 18. Module Assessment The module will be assessed by one group assessment 30% Semester examination 70% Essential Reading: Parkin, M, Powell, M and Matthews, K, (2005) Economics European Edition, 6th ed, Pearson Education, Harlow http://www.booksites.net/parkin/euro/ Supplemental Reading: Sloman, J, (2003) Economics, 5th ed, Pearson Education, England http://www.booksites.net/sloman/ http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/ema_uk_he_sloman_economics_5/ Mankiw, NG (2004) Principles of Economics 3rd ed, Thomson South Western, United States http://www.harcourtcollege.com/econ/mankiw/ Begg, D, Fischer, S and Dornbusch, R (2005) Economics 8th ed, McGraw-Hill International, UK http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0077107756/student_view0/index.html Turley, G and Maloney, M (2001) Principles of Economics - an Irish Textbook 2nd ed, Gill and Macmillan, Dublin Websites WebCT http://webcourses.dit.ie The Central Statistics Office http://www.cso.ie/ The Central Bank of Ireland http://www.centralbank.ie/ The Department of Finance http://www.finance.gov.ie/ The Economic and Social Research Institute http://www.esri.ie/ 18
  19. 19. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Communications and the Organisation Module Author: Valerie Gannon Module Description: “Communications and the Organisation” builds on the foundation knowledge gained by students in “Essentials of Communications” in year 1, and provides a social-cultural perspective on mass communications to compliment “Marketing Communications” (also in this semester). This module focuses on two broad aspects of research and theory on communications and organisations namely: Communications within the Organisation and Mass-mediated communications. In exploring communications within the organisation this module examines small group and team communications, and the organisational culture and structure that creates the internal communications climate. Mass communications theory is examined via the changing communications environment where mass media is fast losing out to the consumption of multiple one-to-one media. Module Aim: The aim of this module is to build on the foundation knowledge of interpersonal communications gained in the “Essentials of Communications” module in year 1. In the “Communications and the Organisation” module the marketing student gains an understanding of a range of organisational communication theories and applications, and a broad overview of the fast-changing mass communicated media environment. Students are also facilitated in building on skills in writing and presentation, with a focus in this module on the business context for written and oral presentation. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: 1. Have an understanding of the roles of groups 2. Be familiar with roles people play in teams and have an awareness of conflict management issues in a group setting 3. Identify the styles of leadership and their impact on team climate and direction 4. Critically engage with current theory on organisational communications and culture 5. Demonstrate an understanding of how organisations can be conceptualised in various ways and how this impacts on the representation of communications 6. Distinguish between the formal and informal organisational communications /home/pptfactory/temp/20100430113710/see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc 04/30/10 11:37 A4/P4
  20. 20. 7. Have gained insights into the social and business impact of mass mediated and public communications 8. Have explored current issues in the changing media landscape 9. Be conversant with the conventions for presenting analytic and persuasive business writing 10. Be equipped to deliver a complex persuasive business presentation – individual or group - with audio-visual aids Learning and Teaching Methods: Theoretical material will be delivered in a lecture setting, which will include and require student contribution and discussion. Experiential learning regarding team work will be provided via a group project and a reflective diary exercise. Skills-based learning will take place in a work-shop environment where students will be closely mentored on a one-to-one basis. Group presentations will be video-taped in tutorials so as to allow for self-review and critical self-reflection. Video, internet and interactive tools will be used to stimulate discussion and facilitate self-directed learning. Module content: Communication within the Organisation Group Roles and Development: Group work forms a cornerstone of modern organisational life. This section explores the characteristics of groups and dynamics of group development. Leadership & Team-building: Leadership styles are acknowledged as key determinants of group direction and climate. Leadership styles are explored along with individual roles within groups, impact of gender, diversity and relationships between group members, and the management of group conflict. Organisational Culture: Cultural ethnographers now commonly accept the organisation as a site of cultural study. This section examines major theories of organisational culture and explores the ways in which organisational culture is communicated and in turn impacts on organisational communications. Organisational Structure and Communication: Organisations can be conceptualised in various ways and the impact of technology is challenging theorists to reconceptualise the modern organisation. Each conceptualisation brings with it a different representation of how communications operate within the organisation. This section looks at both traditional and new organisational structures and crucially at the informal organisation in all cases, and at how these impact on organisational communications. Mass Mediated Communication Mass Media Environment: A review of the mass media environment is presented with a particular focus on Ireland. Mass media theory is reviewed. Students are introduced to the main media institutions, relationships between publishers, consumers and advertisers and issues in media consumption. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  21. 21. Changing Media Environment: The explosion in new media channels in recent years has lead many commentators to predict a fundamental shift in the relationships and sites of power in the media world. This section will review new media consumption, the growth in power of the media consumer, and the challenge facing traditional advertising media. Communication Skills Business Writing: Students will be guided through the conventions for business writing in a tutorial setting and required to apply this in their formative assessment. Presentation Skills: Presentation skills developed at a foundation level in the module “Essentials of Communications” are built upon in this module. Advanced skills are explored via the introduction of audio-visual aids and students are required to present groupwork material, thus integrating theoretical learning about groups with the skills to work in such a setting. Advanced oral and non-verbal communications skills are developed via videotaping and review of individual presentations. Module Assessment: Formative Assessment (all individual) 50% Formative assessment will take a number of different forms: 1. Short MCQ type assessment in tutorial to determine ongoing assimilation of lecture based material (learning outcomes 1 through 8) 2. Group work towards submission of business report (see 3 following) – reflective diary submission on students own experience of groupwork in light of practical and theoretical learning about groups (learning outcomes 1-3) 3. Submission of report on organisational communications and culture (learning outcomes 4-6) via business writing conventions which have been introduced in tutorials (learning outcome 9) 4. Oral presentation of business report (see 3 above) developing on oral presentation skills which have been explored in tutorial/workshop setting (learning outcome 10). Semester Examination 50% The examination will determine the students’ assimilation and analysis with respect to theoretical aspects of learning outcomes 1 through 8. Essential Reading: Gamble, Teri Kwal and Gamble, Michael Communication Works 8th edition (2005) McGraw Hill New York ISBN 0-07-286282-3 Chapters 11-13 and 18-19 and Appendix Hartley, Peter and Bruckman, Clive G. (2002) Business Communication London: Routledge Chapters 4,6, 7-10, 14 Web references, journals and other: http://www.plainlanguage.gov/ see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  22. 22. Website of Plain Language (Plain English) movement in US, spearheaded by Federal Employees http://www.plainenglish.co.uk/ Website of Plain English Campaign in UK, an independent pressure group lobbying for clarity in public communications. http://www.lib.washington.edu/subject/communications/lrcs/index.html “This web site is a springboard that librarians, students, and researchers can use to find information in the area of communication studies.” see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  23. 23. Pre-Requisite Co- ECTS Module Module Title Modules Requisite Credits Code code(s) Modules code(s) 5 French 3 option Module Author: laurence Paveau Module Description: This module will focus on the continuous acquisition of business French and oral as well as written expression in a business context. Module aim The aim of this module is to strengthen the learner’s level of written and oral French. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to • Establish and maintain business relationships • Negotiate in a business environment • Attend business meetings • Have conversations with native speakers on a variety of topics. Learning and Teaching Methods: discussion, role-play, video, film, work-based learning, readings self-directed learning Module content: • Marketing • Advertising • Transports • Insurance • Foreign Trade see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  24. 24. • The Stock Exchange • The Economy Culture Francophonie: What it is, where it is, why it is which leads to examine the notion of colonisation for some of the countries concerned which can also bring the next theme. Changing society: new laws, immigration, multi-cultural society, racism, integration, second generation immigrants, identity, new trend of emigration among young people in France. Grammar in context Revision of moods and tenses with particular focus on the subjunctive mood and its tenses word order Module Assessment There will be two individual continuous assessments, and an oral examination. The first continuous assessment will be an in-class assessment and the second one will be a self- directed project. In-class assessment 30% Continuous assessment 30% Oral examination 40% Essential Reading: No essential readings are required. The students will be working on newspapers articles and magazines Supplemental Reading: Collins-Robert French Dictionary: Complete & Unabridged, March 2005, Harper Collins Publisher see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  25. 25. Binon, J., Verlinde, S., Van Dyck, J., Bertels, A. (2001) DAFA – Dictionnaire d’apprentissage du français des affaires, Didier Web references, journals and other: Web references, journals and other: http://www.edufle.net/rubrique52.html http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~creitan/grammar.htm http://www.lepointdufle.net/p/speciali.htm http://platea.pntic.mec.es/~cvera/exfrances/exercicesvoc.html http://www.dictionnaire-commercial.com/fr/accueil_consultation_dico.htm http://walras.u-strasbg.fr/crl/fle_sites_educatifs.htm www.liberation.fr www.lemonde.fr www.nomade.fr www.voila.fr www.monde-diplomatique.fr http://www.rfi.fr/ http://www.radiofrance.fr/index.php?host=www.radiofrance.com http://www.france2.fr/ http://www.france3.fr see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  26. 26. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Logistics and Supply Chain Management Option Module author: Alacoque McAlpine Module Description: Logistics can be defined as getting the right product, at the right price, to the right place, in the right quantity, in the right condition, to the right customer at the right time. The changing nature of markets and the globalisation of business has sharpened the focus on the need for better logistics capabilities and supply chain management. Supply chains need to be developed which can deliver the required levels of service at minimum cost. Logistics and supply chain management deals with managing the flow of goods from a business firm's suppliers, through its facilities, and on to its customers. It is of critical importance in establishing a competitive advantage. Proper performance of the logistics functions can contribute to both lower costs and enhanced customer service. While transportation is the heart of logistics, inventory management, warehousing, order processing, materials handling, packaging, plant and warehouse location, and customer service are also important logistics activities. This course examines all aspects of logistics, including some of the techniques and strategies for planning, organising and managing the overall logistics process including the functional areas of forecasting, inventory management and customer service. Module Aim The aim of the module is to give students a good overview of the key areas of logistics and supply chain management and upon completion of the module students should have a good understanding of the basic principles of logistics and supply chain management. This module provides an overview of the importance of logistics and the supply chain process in determining the competitive success of an organisation. Students will be introduced to the various components of the supply chain and their logistical requirements. The module also aims to introduced students to the range of subject areas to be examined in the logistics and supply chain management specialism of the overall degree programme. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  27. 27. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, students will be able to: • Demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of logistics to the performance of the business and the economy in general. • Describe the main constituent parts of logistics and supply chain management. • Explain the role of supply chain management in relation to the overall business improvement process. • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of inventory management, warehousing, forecasting, quality management, • Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectivity of logistics with other business functions including marketing, information technology, quality management and operations. Learning and Teaching Methods: The module combines formal lectures, interactive presentations, case studies, participant activities and exercises to maximise the impact of the learning experience. Students will have ample time to consider the ideas and apply the skills discussed and it is expected that these interactive exercises will serve to reinforce some of the learning on the module. In addition, company case histories and video presentations will be presented to illustrate key themes in the module. Module content: Topics in the module include: • Basic concepts of logistics and supply chain management: definitions, mission, goals and benefits. • Supply chain management context: the changed business environment, components of the SCM process, primary and secondary chains. • Evolution and development of supply chain management philosophy. • Key trends in the business environment and the impact on supply chain management. • The logistics mix. • A value chain perspective: internal and external relationships, material flows and information flows. • Upstream and downstream material flows. • Materials management and operations management. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  28. 28. • Transportation and distribution management. • The role of technology in effective supply chain management: information flows, characteristics • Trends in logistics and supply chain management. • Supply chain decision making. • SCM in practice: case studies in logistics and supply chain management. Module Assessment Assessment of the course will be a combination of Formative assessment (30%) and summative assessment (70%). The formative assessment assignment will involve a case study of logistics situation. This will require the individual student to demonstrate an integrated understanding of a range of logistics functions and strategies. Summative assessment will involve students being assessed on their understanding and knowledge of logistics and supply chain management theory and practice in an examination. Essential Reading: John J. Coyle, J.J., E.J. Bardi, C. J. Langley, 2003, The Management of Business Logistics: A supply Chain Perspective, 7th edition, South-Western/Thomson Learning. Supplemental Reading: Waters, D., 2002, Logistics: An Introduction to Supply Chain Management, Basingstoke: Palgrave. Handfield, R., 2001, Purchasing and Supply Chain Management, 2nd edition, International Thomson. Web references, journals and other: Journals used on this module will include: • European Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management • Supply Chain Management: An International Journal • International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistical Management • International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  29. 29. • International Journal of Logistics – Research and Applications • Supply Chain Management Review • Journal of Business Logistics • European Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  30. 30. Pre- Co-Requisite ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Modules Credits Code Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Management of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) Module author: Joy Redmond Module Description: This module involves a thorough examination of the impact of information communication technologies on management practices within the networked economy plus an advanced exploration of the key aspects of e-business strategy. Module aim The aim of this module is to give students a fundamental understanding of the specific challenges facing organisations today with a particular emphasis on how technology can be harnessed to affect change. The module provides the learner with rigorous concepts and theories from business and technology, providing the learner with frameworks and analytical tools in developing strategy in today’s multi-linked marketplace. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to do the following: - Incorporate ICT and e-business strategy into an organisation’s goals and objectives. - Identify organisational processes and relationships that may benefit from the application of technology. - Gain an in-depth understanding of the key challenges and criticisms relating to ICT and e-business strategy. Learning and Teaching Methods: The module incorporates formal lectures, class discussions, case studies, readings, project work and class presentations. Guest lecture(s) will also provide the student with real-life applications. Module content: Description of syllabus content covered in module. 1. Introduction to ICT/E-business see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  31. 31. 2. Introduction to current technologies 3. Market Opportunity Analysis 4. E-Business Models 5. Internet Marketing Tactics and Strategy 6. Information/Knowledge Management 7. Customer Relationship Management 8. Supply Chain Management Module Assessment Continuous Assessment 40% End of Year Examination 60% The continuous assessment consists of one individual assignment and one group project. E-bay Individual Project (15% of total) The project requires students to sell a product through ebay and present their key learnings from this exercise. ICT Tracker Study (25% of total) The project requires students to conduct a strategic analysis of an organisation, in relation to its ICT business strategy implementation. - Oral presentation of study (5%) - Comprehensive Written Report, one per group (20%) Essential Reading: Journal articles and relevant chapters from the two recommended text books will form the dominant element of reading matter for this module. All articles will be uploaded into the course intranet. Students are also encouraged to upload relevant articles. Text books: Rayport, F. Jeffrey, Bernard J. Jaworski (2002), Introduction to E-Commerce, Second Edition, Mc GrawHill. Chaffey, D., Mayer, R., Johnston, K., Ellis-Chadwick, F. (2003), Internet Marketing, Second Edition, FT Prentice Hall. Web references, journals and other: Business Source Premier: Has a multiplicity of journals and relevant articles. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  32. 32. Various vertical interest portals relating to each topic. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  33. 33. Modules: Semester Two Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Marketing Planning Module author: Aileen Kennedy Module Description: This module reinforces what Marketing is for the student by getting to grips with the practicalities of Marketing via a marketing plan. This modules explores what marketing planning is and how it works, how to carry out a marketing audit, how to set objectives and strategies, how to schedule and cost out what has to be done to achieve objectives and how to design and implement a marketing planning system. Module aim The module is both process and output based. It aims to familiarise students with the process of strategic marketing planning in a practical and applied manner. In terms of output the aim of the module is to enable students to generate a real time marketing plan for a company of their choice which will reinforce the key steps and issues to consider in the process of developing a marketing plan. Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, the learner will: 1: Appreciate the steps involved in the strategic marketing planning process 2: Recognise the appropriate marketing diagnostic tools, structures and frameworks to use at each stage of the process. 3: Be able o prepare a practical logical strategic marketing plan for an organisation. Learning and Teaching Methods The core steps of the marketing planning process will be delivered in lecture format, this content will be supported by the Marketing PlanPro software which will be available to students (Accompanies Wood 2005). Guest lectures from companies engaged in the marketing planning process will also be invited to address participants. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  34. 34. Module Content: The Marketing Planning Process Introduction to marketing planning. The main steps in the marketing planning process. Defining marketing planning. The strategic and tactical marketing plan. Key components of the strategic marketing plan. Barriers to be overcome in the planning process; confusion; too much detail; separation of strategic and operational planning; failure to integrate strategic market planning into corporate planning; weak support from management. The Customer, Market and Product Audit Defining customers and consumers. The market segmentation process; market mapping. Defining the products and brands sold. Key diagnostic tools include; life cycle analysis; the Boston Consulting Group Matrix (BCG); the directional policy matrix. Setting marketing Objectives and Strategies Defining marketing objectives and their relationship to corporate objectives. Exploring competitive strategies to secure competitive advantage. Using “gap analysis” to start the process of market planning. New product development as a growth strategy. How to set marketing strategies. Developing the communication plan: Advertising and Sales promotion The difference between personal and impersonal communications. Methods for deciding on the mix. The preparation of an advertising plan. Advertising objectives how to set them and use them. How to prepare and set a sales promotion plan. Developing the communication plan: The Sales plan Role and importance of personal selling in the marketing mix. Setting quantitative and qualitative sales objectives, improving sales force productivity, managing a sales force. Preparing a sales plan and integrating marketing communications. The Pricing Plan. Pricing approaches. Portfolio management, life cycle analysis, product positioning and pricing implications. Pricing for channels, for competitive advantage. How to prepare a pricing plan. The Distribution and Customer Service Plan Components of the distribution mix, routes to market (channels) including electronic options. Reconfiguring the market map. Selecting the most appropriate channels. Components of customer service. Marketing information, forecasting and organising for marketing planning see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  35. 35. Marketing research; approaches, budgets. Marketing information systems (MIS). Data warehousing; mining. Customer Relationship Management (CRM). Forecasting techniques. Organisational structures for marketing planning. Module Assessment: The module is based on the preparation of a marketing plan for a company either in the industrial (B2B), consumer (B2C), services sector, non profit examples or company active in international marketing activities. It is based on extensive secondary data sources exclusively. Aim is to build on, extend and integrate the student’s knowledge in these areas gained through previous exposure to these topics in preceding modules. Real world examples will help the students to see how strategic marketing plans are developed and implemented by actual companies (large and small) and this project based focus will effectively illustrate how companies are applying marketing planning in current, real life situations. Marketing PlanPro (version 6.0), a marketing planning software tool will be used to support students in the preparation of their plans. The module is 100% group assessment based. This includes the presentation of a completed written marketing plan, and an oral presentation of same. The assessment design reinforces learning outcomes number 1, 2 and 3. Essential Reading: Wood, M. B. (2004) Marketing Plan Handbook and Marketing Plan pro, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-164149-2. Recommended Reading: McDonald M. (2002) Marketing Plans: How to Prepare Them; How to Use Them, 5th Edition, Butterworth Heineman. Cohen W.A. (2005) The Marketing Plan, 4th Edition, Wiley. ISBN 0471230596. Web References: Marketing Planpro overview www.palalto.com Marketing Plans Software and sample Marketing Plans www.mplans.com Business Plan centre (with a library of real business plans) www.businessplans.org Other appropriate web references for companies will be provided throughout the module. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  36. 36. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Market Research Applications Module author: Joy Redmond Module Description: This module builds on the learning outcomes of the marketing research and statistics modules in semesters 1, 2 and 3, and presents students with a thorough grounding in the application of statistical techniques for the purposes of marketing research. Module aim The aim of this subject is that students will gain a thorough understanding of variety of statistical tests available to the market researcher. This module places more emphasis on choice of an appropriate statistical technique and commenting on its relevance to the research problem rather than computation. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be expected to: Identify and assess a variety of statistical techniques available to the marketing researcher. Choose an appropriate statistical technique for a given data set. Interpret findings of statistical tests in order to answer the research question Input primary data (collected in semester 3) into SPSS. Manipulate SPSS to compute relevant statistical tests Comment on the validity of data collected in semester 3 based on the project work in semester 4. Learning and Teaching Methods: While much of the subject matter will be presented using lectures, the essential thrust of this course is to focus on the student's own research needs and to demonstrate how professional researchers have approached these issues. Bimonthly tutorials will also be provided. Module content: see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  37. 37. Review of basic statistics Probability distributions Introduction to statistical inference Estimation Hypothesis testing Non-parametric distributions Analysis of variance (ANOVA) The use of SPSS to compute statistical tests (as outlined above) The Application of statistical tests to marketing research problems Reports and their presentation. Module Assessment This subject is partially examined through the use of a project, which builds from the primary data assessment in semester 3. Students will be required to input the primary data into SPSS and to conduct relevant statistical tests. Module examination 60% Continuous Assessment (Individual) 15% Research Project (Individual) 25% Essential Reading: Malhotra, N, D. and Birks D., Marketing Research: An Applied Approach, 2nd European Edition, Financial Times Management, London 2003. Supplemental Reading Various chapters of the following texts are useful for particular sections of the course Domegan, C. and Fleming, D., Marketing Research in Ireland, 2nd Edition, Gill and Macmillan, Dublin 2003. Chisnall, P., Marketing Research, 6th Edition, McGraw Hill, London 2001. Diamantopoulos, A. and Schlegelmilch, B., Taking the Fear out of Data Analysis, The Dryden Press, 1997. Website Web links to further online resources are contained in the website designed for this class group. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  38. 38. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Macroeconomics Module author: Siobhan Mc Carthy Module Description: This module is an introduction to macro economic theory and some of its applications. Module aim The aim of this module is to develop a basic competence in macroeconomics. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to demonstrate an understanding of: How to measure economic activity in the given year using GDP and GNP and the growth in the economy over time. How to measure and calculate inflation using CPI and the GDP Deflator How to model the aggregate goods and money markets using the classical model and other models The main issues of macroeconomics and the different policies that can be used to achieve objectives including fiscal and monetary policy Learning and Teaching Methods: A variety of methods will be used including lectures, tutorials and use of Web CT. There will be a mix of formal teaching, class discussion, problem-solving and case studies. Module content: Introduction Objectives of macroeconomic policy. Methods of measuring economic activity. Relevant statistics for the Irish economy see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  39. 39. Macroeconomics Keynesian and monetarist/supply side views. Aggregate demand/aggregate supply analysis. Expenditure: consumption and savings. The nature and effectiveness of fiscal policy. Monetary policy. Role of money. Financial Intermediation. Role and functions of Central Bank. Control of Aggregate Demand Fiscal policy/ Monetary policy and Aggregate Demand. Inflation and Unemployment Definitions and Causes. National/ External Debt. Balance of Payments. Exchange Rates, Fluctuating Euro/Dollar/Sterling exchange rate Current/Topical Issues: Inflationary Trends, Wage Spirals, Current State of the Economy, Growth vs Social Provision Module Assessment The module will be assessed by one individual continuous assessments for which 30% of the marks will be allocated. The final examination will account for 70% of the marks. Essential Reading: Parkin, M, Powell, M and Matthews, K, (2005) Economics European Edition, 6th ed, Pearson Education, Harlow http://www.booksites.net/parkin/euro/ Supplemental Reading: Sloman, J, (2003) Economics, 5th ed, Pearson Education, England http://www.booksites.net/sloman/ http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/ema_uk_he_sloman_economics_5/ Mankiw, NG (2004) Principles of Economics 3rd ed, Thomson South Western, United States http://www.harcourtcollege.com/econ/mankiw/ Begg, D, Fischer, S and Dornbusch, R (2005) Economics 8th ed, McGraw-Hill International, UK http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0077107756/student_view0/index.html Turley, G and Maloney, M (2001) Principles of Economics - an Irish Textbook 2nd ed, Gill and Macmillan, Dublin see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  40. 40. Web References WebCT http://webcourses.dit.ie The Central Statistics Office http://www.cso.ie/ The Central Bank of Ireland http://www.centralbank.ie/ The Department of Finance http://www.finance.gov.ie/ The Economic and Social Research Institute http://www.esri.ie/ see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  41. 41. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 International Marketing Module author: Aileen Kennedy. Module Description: The central focus of this course is the examination and development of strategies for the firm competing in European and Global markets. The course examines the strategic issues arising in the management of the firms international and global marketing operations. The main sections of the module deal with issues such as the nature and significance of International Marketing in the global economy; the components of the international marketing environment and how these impact firm actions; how firms can screen and analyse opportunities which arise internationally; and how to approach the issue of entry strategy selection and management to exploit opportunities in a foreign marketplace. As the marketing programme alters dramatically outside of the domestic sphere, managing the international marketing mix is examined in some detail as is the area of distribution channel management. As firms of every type and sector of activity engage in international marketing, the Services firms and the Industrial products firm perspective is also introduced to broaden students understanding of the issues involved. Module aim The aim of this module is to develop the students understanding and appreciation of the rapidly changing global marketing environment within which business now operates. The module aims to enable the students understanding of the interaction and complexity among the main methods of entering and competing in international markets and to develop competence in the area of implementation of international marketing plans and entry strategies. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  42. 42. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to… 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the key issues involved in International Marketing theory 2: Examine and appreciate the components and issues of relevance to the development of international marketing strategies for firms in the manufacturing, service and industrial sectors. 3: Evaluate and integrate the key theoretical contributions from the literature and apply these to the examination and analysis of management problems facing international companies, 4: Identify, select and evaluate appropriate courses of action and business strategies for the firm competing in European and Global markets. Learning and Teaching Methods: Lectures, case study analysis and presentation, as well as guest lecturers will be used to develop students’ awareness and understanding of the increasing internationalisation and globalisation of markets and the challenges associated with marketing at this level. Students will be required to prepare case study materials for use in class, read prescribed journal articles and complete individual and group project work as prescribed. Module content: 1 Nature & Significance of International Marketing The Evolution of a Global Economy Alterations in the patterns of world trade, new economic alliances, the Euro, the consolidation of European trade, trade without frontiers; Ireland’s role in World Trade; the World-Wide-Web and International Marketing. Determinants of International Trade: Economic and Financial Forces Patterns of world trade. Trade theories of the firm in international markets. Limitations of trade theory. Trade Restrictions. Balance of Payments. International Agencies - IMF, World Bank, EMS, GATT. Economic Integration. 2 The International Marketing Environment The Socio-Cultural Forces in International Marketing Analytical approaches to cultural factors. Characteristics and elements of culture- language, religion, values, communication, education. Operating in multi-cultural see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  43. 43. environments. Cultural influences on the international firm and implications for marketing strategy. The Political and Legal Environment of International Marketing Home and host country political forces and actions. Importance of political stability. Political risk assessment. Risk reduction strategies. International Law. Conflict resolution, dispute settlement and litigation. Regulatory environment (EU & WTO). 3 Analysing International Marketing Opportunities International Market Screening and Selection Screening international market opportunities. Market selection decision techniques. Regional market characteristics. Marketing in transitional economies less developed markets (LDC’s) and emerging markets. International Marketing Information Systems and Market Research Overview of Marketing Information Systems. Current issues in international research - complexity, costs, co-ordination, comparability. Competitive Analysis & Strategies Industry analysis forces influencing competition. National and firm competitive advantage. Identifying and analysing international competitors. 4 International Marketing Strategy: Entering International Markets Market Entry & Expansion Strategies Exporting as strategy for international market entry. Determinants of export behaviour. The export decision process. Assessing export competitiveness. Entering markets through foreign direct investment (FDI). Trends in FDI. Conditions for success in FDI. Co-operative Strategies and Global Strategic Partnerships Nature of strategic partnerships & alliances. Key success factors. Co-operative strategies – Japan. 5 The International Marketing Programme Managing the International Marketing Mix Product: Product design considerations. Geographic expansion & strategic alternatives available. New products in international markets. Price: Environmental influences on pricing, International pricing objectives and strategies, policy alternative. Promotion: Standardisation v.’s adaptation debate. Developing, managing and implementing international brand strategies. The Services Firm in International Markets Growth in services trade world-wide. Issues in the International marketing of services. Internationalising the service firm and market entry modalities for services. The Industrial Products Firm in International Markets see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  44. 44. Nature of industrial markets. Selling & promoting industrial products. Network perspective on internationalising business firms. The impact of e commerce on International Marketing The development of e commerce and its effects on international marketing. Impact of e commerce on the marketing programme and entry strategies and market modalities. Components of the electronic value chain. Personal Selling & Negotiations Selling in International markets, the international selling sequence. Understanding cross cultural communications, recruitment and management of an international sales force. Cross-cultural negotiations. 6 Implementing the International Marketing Programme Managing International Distribution Channels. Nature of international channels of distribution. Structure, function and effectiveness of channels. Channels objectives and constraints – consumer, industrial and service firms. Channel innovation. Managing International Marketing Operations Organisation structures. Operational control of the international marketing effort. Managing the assessment of marketing performance. Module Assessment Continuous assessment(s) 50%, These group assessments will focus on examining and analysing the inter national marketing practices of Irish and international companies through case studies and secondary data collection. Course work will reinforce learning outcomes number 2, 3 and 4. Semester examination. 50%. This exam format will reinforce learning outcomes number 1, 2 and 3. Essential Reading: Ghauri P. & Cateora P. (2005), International Marketing, 2nd Edition, Mc Graw Hill. Supplemental Reading: Czinkota M.R. & Ronkainen I.A. (2004), International Marketing, 7th Edition, International Student Edition, Thomson, South Western. Albaum, G, Duerr & Strandskov J. (2005), International Marketing and Export Management, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  45. 45. Bradley F. (2002), International Marketing Strategy, 4th Edition, FT Prentice Hall. Web references, journals and other: Irish Exporters Association www.irishexporters.ie Enterprise Ireland www.enterprise-ireland.com The World Bank http://www.worldbank.org Euromonitor http://www.euromonitor.com European Commission site http://www.europa.eu.int IntertradeIreland http://www.intertradeireland.com Bord Failte http://www.irishtouristboard.ie Economic data sources for OECD countries http://www.oecd.org and http://www.oecd.org/publications/fugures.index.htm World Trade Organisation http://www.wto.org Central & Eastern Europe country information http://www.itaip.doc.gov/eebic/ceebic.html A summary of International Business Resources on the web from Michigan State University, Centre for International Business Education and Research. http://ciber.bus.msu.edu/busres.htm International Business Resources http://www.ciber.bus.msu.edu/busres.htm Relevant Journals Columbia Journal of World Business European Journal of Marketing Harvard Business Review International Business Review International Marketing Review Irish Marketing Review Journal of Global Marketing Journal of International Business Studies Journal of International Marketing Journal of Marketing Long Range Planning Management International Review Sloan Management Review see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  46. 46. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Marketing Communications Module Author: Valerie Gannon Module Description: Students develop a basic understanding of the marketing communications mix within the marketing context in earlier Marketing modules. This module draws on these basics, on the basics of communications theory provided in “Essentials of Communication”, and on understanding of media in society gained in “Communications and the Organisation”. In this module students are enabled to develop a fuller and more sophisticated insight into contemporary marketing communications theory and practice. The particular emphasis is on the development of understanding and practice in marketing communications strategy and practice. The module explores four broad avenues in theory and practice: Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communications, the IMC process, Management and Planning of IMC and the IMC Mix. Module Aim: The aim of this module is to provide the marketing student with an understanding of integrated marketing communications theory, the integrated marketing communications planning process, and to develop skills in the preparation of marketing communications plans and reports. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will: Have an understanding of the fundamentals of integrated marketing communications theory Be conversant with a range of contemporary brands and branding issues Identify the main marcomms agency categories, how they operate and their relationship with clients Critically engage with current issues in advertising regulation and ethics Have explored the process of meaning creation in advertising Be informed regarding the contemporary media environment and how it is changing Be equipped to research and write a simple marketing communications plan Demonstrate an understanding of how the outcomes of a marketing communications plan may be evaluated Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between plans, campaigns and budgets see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  47. 47. Analyse the range and depth of marcomms mix activities as outlined below Learning and Teaching Methods: Theoretical material will be delivered in a lecture setting, which will include and require student contribution and discussion. Practicee will be reviewed via case histories from the IAPI AdFX and IPA Advertising Works series. Students will gain experiential learning in a simulated environment via the preparation of a marketing communications plan. Module content: Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communcations Overview of Integrated Marketing Communications: It now axiomatic for marcomms campaigns to aim for synergy and integration among their various elements, but was not so until recent years. This section reviews marcomms activity in general, and IMC activity in particular, and developing theory in this area. Brands and Branding: Developing and building brands is the core marcomms activity. This section reviews brands, brand-equity building drawing on case histories and students own consumer experiences. The IMC Process The Advertising Industry: Much marcomms activity relies on third party service providers. This section reviews the advertising industry looking at service provision by agencies, agency internal processes and agency relationships with clients across the range of marketing communications mix activities. Regulation & Ethics: Advertising in Europe operates in an increasingly regulated environment and within a socio-cultural climate of consumer concern on issues such as teenage drinking and childhood obesity. This section reviews the regulatory environment and the ethical implications of marketing communications activity. Meaning Creation in Marketing Communications: This section explores how branding draws on the social and cultural world to create shared meaning between advertisers and consumers. Media in a world of fragmenting audiences: Mass marketing communications are increasingly under challenge from fragmenting audiences, changing consumer lifestyles and new media avenues. Students gain critical insights in this section into media options, planning decisions, and major media research vehicles. Management & Planning of IMC Marketing Communications Planning and Plans: Co-ordination and integration of all marcomm activities requires sophisticated planning. This section equips students to see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  48. 48. develop a marcomms plan from situation analysis, through objective setting to strategy for each element of the marcomms mix (e.g. advertising, public relations etc. see below). Evaluating the Marcomms Campaign: Marcomms decisions must be based on solid analysis of research data. This involves an understanding of the research approaches available for message research: both pre-testing and post-testing e.g.understanding of meaning, recognition, recall, brand awareness, tracking studies etc. Determining Budgets, Objectives, Strategy & tactics: The relationship between strategy and implementation is explored, which is intimately tied up with budgeting. How can broad strategic aims be translated into actual marcomms activities, and what kind of constraints does the budget impose? The IMC Mix This section provides a theoretical underpinning and practical discussion of all aspects of the marketing communications mix including: Advertising, Public Relations, Sponsorship, Sales Promotions, Direct Marketing, Web-based Communications, Personal selling and Sales Management, Merchandising, Packaging, Point-of-sale, Exhibitions and Trade Shows. Module Assessment: Individual Formative Assessment: 40% Semester Examination: 60% Essential Reading: Pickton, David & Broderick, Amanda (2004) Integrated Marketing Communications 2nd Edition FT Prentice Hall ISBN 0-273-67645-8 IAPI AdFX and IPA Advertising Works Case History Series – relevant and up-to-date cases will be specified each year. Supplemental Reading: Shimp, Terence A. (2003) Advertising, Promotion, & Supplemental Aspects of Integrated Marketing Communications Ohio: Thomson/Southwestern ISBN 0-03-035271-1 Smith, P.R. & Taylor, Jonathan (2004) Marketing Communications: An Integrated Approach 4th Edition London: Kogan Page ISBN 0-7494-4265-4 Web references, journals and other: Students will be supplied with relevant sites and journal articles. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  49. 49. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  50. 50. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 French 4 option Module author: laurence Paveau Module Description: This module is the last French module for the Certificate in Marketing. Therefore it will focus on revising acquired knowledge and perfecting the learner’s level of French. Module aim The aim of this module is to; Perfect the learner’s knowledge and reinforce his confidence regarding his knowledge and his abilities in the French language. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to Sustain a conversation with native speakers Discuss business dealings Understand television and radio Demonstrate an awareness of French culture and the differences between Ireland and France generally and in terms of business practices. Learning and Teaching Methods: discussion, role-play, video, film, work-based learning, readings self-directed learning see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  51. 51. Module content: Business French • Participating in product and company presentations • Applying for a post in France (letters of application and Curriculum Vitae) • Attending an interview • Increasing skills in commercial correspondence • Dealing with financial institutions, insurance companies, chambers of commerce and government departments. Cultural aspects of France Religions: clergy, place of religion in France, historical image of catholic church compared to Ireland, separation church-state, relationship between different religions in France. Educational system concentrating maybe on the laicity aspect of school, the existence of national vs private schools. Access to third level, different third-level institutions, number of students, of universities. Grammar in context: Passive form and its uses Prepositions adverbs Module Assessment There will be two individual continuous assessments, and an oral examination. The first continuous assessment will be an in-class assessment and the second one will be a self- directed project. In-class assessment 30% Continuous assessment 30% Oral examination 40% see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  52. 52. Essential Reading: No essential readings are required. The students will be working on newspapers articles and magazines Supplemental Reading: Collins-Robert French Dictionary: Complete & Unabridged, March 2005, Harper Collins Publisher Binon, J., Verlinde, S., Van Dyck, J., Bertels, A. (2001) DAFA – Dictionnaire d’apprentissage du français des affaires, Didier Web references, journals and other: Web references, journals and other: http://www.edufle.net/rubrique52.html http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~creitan/grammar.htm http://www.lepointdufle.net/p/speciali.htm http://platea.pntic.mec.es/~cvera/exfrances/exercicesvoc.html http://www.dictionnaire-commercial.com/fr/accueil_consultation_dico.htm http://walras.u-strasbg.fr/crl/fle_sites_educatifs.htm www.liberation.fr www.lemonde.fr www.nomade.fr www.voila.fr www.monde-diplomatique.fr http://www.rfi.fr/ http://www.radiofrance.fr/index.php?host=www.radiofrance.com http://www.france2.fr/ http://www.france3.fr see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  53. 53. Pre- Co- ECTS Module Module Title Requisite Requisite Credits Code Modules Modules code(s) code(s) 5 Data-Driven Marketing Module author: Mary Lawlor Module Description: The module provides an introduction to geographic (GIS) and demographic information systems and their applications in a marketing environment. This modules explores the tasks involved in setting up a marketing database, adding geographic and demographic data and analysing the data to make better marketing decisions The module addresses the scope for marketers in analysing customers, making store location decisions and the allocation of marketing expenditure. The focus of this module is on the hands-on experience for learners with three leading- edge software packages. Data issues in customer relationship management (CRM) projects are explored. Module aim The aim of this module is to develop an understand of the potential of GIS and Demographic Systems for customer and market analysis to making marketing decisions. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: Recognise the potential of geographic and geo-demographic information systems for marketing decision making. Analyse and evaluate the value of different geographic regions and discriminate among different customers groups Organise geographic marketing information systems Create well-behaved relational databases Store, retrieve, tabulate and examine data through elementary scripting Analyse data using software mining algorithms. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  54. 54. Learning and Teaching Methods: The learning will be computer laboratory based where the learner will become proficient in the use of Geoconcept, Mosaic and Clementine software. The learner will develop specific skills and competences in the analysis of customer and market data. A database will be created, developed and analysed. The learner will be required to demonstrate their understanding of each package through their application of the software to different CRM scenarios. Module content: Geographic Information Systems Growth and development of GIS. Applications in marketing contexts. An introduction to GIS software, data types, and structure in GeoConcept. Navigation tools within GeoConcept Importing data for analysis in GeoConcept Object selection and presentation styles Queries, including topological queries: catchment areas and penetration rates Applying thematics and charts for display Constructing formula to query and present data Labelling and presentation of information Thematics, Styles and Formulae Geo-demographic Information Systems Introduction to Geo-demographic systems. Mosaic software. Importing geo- demographic data into a customer database. Appending life-style indicators on geo-coded data. Analysis of data. Databases and Data-mining Systems Introduction to Databases and Data Warehousing Relational Databases and Normal Forms Introduction to Data-mining and Knowledge Discovery Introduction to Clementine – Interface and Data handling Data-mining in Clementine see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  55. 55. Module Assessment (individual) Geographic Information Systems Scenario 35% Each learner will be given a scenario using a database and will be required to analyse and discriminate between different customer groups. Mosaic Scenario 15% Learners will be required to overlay demographic data on GIS data and analyse customer groups and segments. Clementine Scenario 50% The learner will be required to demonstrate a level of competence in data analysis using software mining algorithms Essential Reading: A prescribed set of academic articles on Geodemographics and Datamining will be made available to the learner Course Software Manuals: Geoconcept and Clementine Web references, journals and other Journals Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing. Journal of Database Marketing Journal of Direct Marketing Journal of Telephone Marketing see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  56. 56. Pre-Requisite Co-Requisite ECTS Module Module Title Modules Modules Credits Code code(s) code(s) 5 Business to Business Marketing Module Author: Kathleen Hughes Module Description This course provides the student with a comprehensive understanding of the unique issues and challenges facing the Business to Business Marketer. It builds on the knowledge of Consumer Marketing which the students have already acquired and identifies both similarities and differences between both aspects of marketing. It presents the distinct approaches required in managing the marketing mix when dealing with such complex and dynamic forces as organizational buyer behavior and relationship management which are unique to this environment. The impact of technology in managing and building relationships with both customers and suppliers will also be explored. Module Aim The aim of the course is to provide students with a managerial perspective enabling them to address marketing challenges in an industrial context. Students will deepen their understanding of marketing and develop their ability to apply this knowledge in business to business decision making. Learning Outcomes Having completed the course the student should be able to: 1. Analyse a business organizations market environment to identify critical issues and opportunities. 2. Describe the business customers buying behavior and identify relationship management needs. 3. Describe the role of processes such as supply chain management and new product development in business markets. 4. Prepare a Marketing Plan for a Business to Business company. 5. Work effectively in a group situation see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  57. 57. Learning and Teaching Methods Lectures: The main method of instruction is by lectures and class discussion Case Studies and exercises: A selected number of case studies, illustrations and video material will be used which reflect key issues and challenges Module Content • Overview and Introduction to Business to Business: Understanding the structure and nature of markets, customers and goods. Identifying the distinguishing characteristics of business marketing and comparing business and consumer marketing practices. • Organizational Buyer Behaviour: Organizational buyer behavior, the goals of the purchasing organization, managing relationships in business to business markets. • Strategic Planning and assessing market opportunities: Segmenting the business market, organizational demand analysis and the business marketing planning process. • Managing the Marketing Mix in a Business to Business Context: Developing and managing products, managing and the business marketing channel, managing pricing and negotiating to provide customer value. Understanding the key elements of the communications mix for business marketers. Module Assessment: Semester Examination 60% Marketing Strategy Proposal: This is a group assignment. Students will be briefed on a particular business market situation, and will be required to develop a marketing plan to meet objectives. A report and presentation will be required. 40% Essential Reading Blythe, J., and Zimmerman, A., Business to Business Marketing Management, Thomson, 1st ed., 2005. Additional reading and web sites will be assigned to assist learning see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  58. 58. CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT (Guidelines for students) a) Purpose of Continuous Assessment Continuous assessment serves four purposes:- i) Firstly and very often most importantly, it amplifies opportunities for students to engage in self- directed learning. This may not apply in a small number of subjects, particularly quantitative subjects. However, apart from these situations, continuous assessment is structured to provide as much opportunity as possible for self-directed learning and to challenge the student conceptually. ii) Secondly, it provides a means whereby the student can obtain feedback on their participation and progress on the course. iii) Thirdly, it eliminates the difficulties and risk of the student performance being wholly dependent on a single examination and provides the student with an opportunity to accumulate marks over a number of assessments. iv) It provides an alternative and complimentary mode of assessment to formal end of year examinations and allows students scope to show their distinctive strengths. b) Forms of Continuous Assessment i) In-class Examinations This is usually used for quantitative subjects such as accounting and quantitative methods. ii) Essay Assignment These may consist of a 1,500-3,000 word essay on a topic, requiring a criticism of ideas, a synthesis of the key ideas in an area etc. Students may be provided with a set of reference readings (5-10) and be encouraged to access additional material themselves. Lecturers will structure each assessment to the particular course requirements. iii) Project Projects will involve the study of practical situations where the students access information on their own initiative and will generally include the incorporation of theoretical material in application to a practical issue/problem. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  59. 59. iv) Case In these, the student is given information on an organisation, which is used for analysis and the setting out of recommendations on particular organisation issues or overall strategy. v) Other Lecturers may decide on other forms of continuous assessment where appropriate. c) Giving Assessments When giving assessments, notice will be given, i.e. at least two weeks for an in-class examination and at least three weeks for other written assignments. Case studies will normally be given one week in advance for all assignments; the proportion of the total marks being assigned to the assessment will be clearly indicated when notice of the assignment is given. For example if it counts for ten percentage points of total year assessment-i.e. one half of all continuous assignment for the year -say 20%, this will be clearly indicated when notice is given of the assignment, so that students know the importance of the assignment. In addition, in giving assessment the following will be made clear:- i) The assignment brief. ii) The expected length e.g. 2,000 words. iv) Required reading and general direction for other reading where relevant. iv) The precise deadline for submission e.g. 10.00 am 27th Nov. v) Delivery arrangement to the lecturer, e.g. At the start of the 10.00-11.00 lecture on Monday 27th November in the lecture room. vi) Penalties for late delivery. The following are the agreed regulations in relation to reduction of marks for late delivery on certificate course DT303 25% reduction (of mark achieved) for delivery within 24 hours of deadline. 2% reduction per day (including weekend days) thereafter. For case studies, lecturers will indicate the total available for continuous assessment by case studies over the course of the year. Students should note that difficulties often arise at the final stages of preparation of continuous assessment for submission. Such difficulties may include virus infection of disks, corruption of disks, loss of disks, theft of disks, printing difficulties either due to technical difficulties with printing, or unavailability of printing in college due to use of printers for lectures, or because too many students have left printing to the last minute. If a piece of continuous assessment is submitted late for any of the above reasons or related reasons full penalties will be imposed. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  60. 60. Students should plan their work to take account of the possibility of any of the above difficulties arising and should not leave printing to the last moment. In addition, as students advance a piece of work, they should make appropriate back-up copies on floppy disk and by way of hard copy. This will ensure that in the event of the loss of a disk or any technical problem with the disk the student will not have to begin all over again. d) Continuous Assessment and Feedback Students will receive feedback on the marks awarded for continuous assessment. Such feedback will normally be given three weeks after the submission date for the assignment or the class examination. Continuous assessment is retained by the lecturer for availability at examination board meetings. However, lecturers will return assessment to students for perusal of their marked work, but you must return the work to your lecturer, otherwise your mark cannot be included in your overall assessment for the year. e) Receipt of Continuous Assessment You must sign in personally your continuous assessment with the lecturer as indicated when the assignment is given. Failure to do so means it cannot be counted for assessment. (See note below on case studies) You should not hand in continuous assessment to The School Office, The General Office or to the Porters. f) Authenticity of Student Work In order to ensure work authenticity all assignments must be signed by the student at the end of the piece of work. Where there is group work, the assignment must be signed by all members of the group who contributed to the work Where the work is individual, the signature declares that the work is the work of the student concerned, that no plagiarism is involved and in particular that all sources have been fully acknowledged, and that any data gathering has been genuine and authentic. Plagiarism is a serious breach of examination regulations and may result in exclusion from all examinations for the remainder of the academic year and exclusion or deferral from resuming your studies. Where the work is a group project, or a group case study, the signatures verify that: - i) The work is as in the above paragraph and ii) All members of the group have read and approved the total work, iii) All members have fairly contributed to the work and iv) All members accept that the mark awarded for the group work will be awarded to each individual in the group. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10
  61. 61. Case studies are not normally signed in, accept where specified by the lecturer. Instead students are assessed on class presentation. Marks awarded assume conditions (i) to (iv) above. Some lecturers will request hard copy of presentations from all groups in the class and will assess all groups. Individual lecturers will clarify their own approach to the issue. Signatures are not required for case studies. It is assumed that if the group presents in class or hands up the work that they are all bound by conditions i)-iv) above unless an individual student dissents in writing when the case is being handed up or prior to presentation in class. g) Presentation Assignments submitted by way of essay or project should conform to the following:- i) There should be a cover page with the following: a) Student name(s) b) Subject c) Title of essay/project d) Lecturer’s name e) Submission date ii) It should be typed in single spacing, font size 12, apart from headings. iii) Referencing etc. should be as per the ‘Style Guide’. see-yearbook-for-year-2docdoc2775.doc-2005 04/30/10

×