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  • 1. 1 NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF BUSINESS PROPOSAL FOR A MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA) PROGRAM The College of Business proposes to offer a new graduate program. The program is titled: Master of Business Administration (MBA) with the course prefix BUS. The layout of this proposal follows the outline prescribed in Section 18(c) of the Policies Regarding Graduate Faculty, Courses and Programs document. (i) Rationale – There are four chief reasons for offering this program – 1. Persistent requests from local and regional residents and employers for an MBA program to be offered by Northern Michigan University to meet educational, management, and career needs. 2. An MBA program is a distinctive academic product of business schools and the College of Business is well prepared to offer such a program. 3. The MBA program will strengthen and deepen ties with the broader business community, which will in turn enrich the undergraduate business programs at the College. 4. The College of Business has reached a level of competency, capacity, and resource base that drives this initiative to meet the needs of employers and residents of the Upper Peninsula Goals and Objectives – The three chief goals of this program are – 1. To train individuals to be effective managers and decision-makers. 2. To equip individuals with the necessary skills and competencies to enable them to progress in their career. 3. To enhance the capabilities of the workforce in the region and thus contribute to economic development and business growth. The program is entirely consistent with the University’s strategic goal as outlined in the Road Map to 2015. There, the University articulates its goal of increasing the offerings of graduate programs. The program is also in accordance with the College’s goals to provide business education. The faculty brings forth this proposal after extended and thoughtful deliberations. Competencies Expected of Graduates – Students completing this program will be able to -
  • 2. 2 1. Understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of accounting, finance, information systems, marketing, operations management, organization behavior, quantitative business analysis, and strategic management; 2. Think critically, solve problems effectively, and make decisions strategically across functional areas; 3. Work collaboratively with others in cross-functional teams, and to motivate, lead, and mentor others; 4. Communicate ideas and information effectively and persuasively in business settings; 5. Apply sound decision techniques in an ethical manner to management situations. Consistency with the College’s (Department) Mission The College of Business offers a full range of undergraduate programs in business. Its mission is to prepare students for successful careers. The MBA degree is widely seen and recognized as a key academic credential for upward mobility in one’s career. Thus, the offering of this program is fully consistent with the mission and the normal role of a business school. (ii) Job Opportunities – An MBA degree is a passport to a managerial position and a swift rise in the organizational hierarchy. Every organization, large and small, public, private and not-for-profit, employ managers and leaders who have to bring an analytical approach to decision making. It is the most recognized and sought after professional graduate degree in the country. The demand for people with MBA degrees continues to rise. The Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) conducts studies on management education. They report robust demand for MBA graduates primarily for their business management knowledge and their ability to apply that knowledge along with their technical skills to any job or function necessary to reach organizational goals. An MBA graduate with one to five years of work experience is likely to receive greater compensation than are other graduate students with similar work experience. Additionally, MBA graduates typically receive more responsibilities and leadership roles. For more information about job opportunities for those with an MBA degree, please visit GMAC’s website at www.GMAC.com. In the Upper Peninsula, only Michigan Technological University offers this degree; the focus of that program is on its own undergraduate engineers. The College of Business conducted a survey in Winter 2008 of residents in the Greater Marquette area. Nearly 450 respondents indicated interest in participating in an MBA program. (iii) Related Programs – The College of Business does not currently offer any graduate program. The MBA program is largely a standardized academic product. In crafting this program, the faculty in the College examined MBA programs in aspirant institutions and those in the broader
  • 3. 3 geographical area (Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, North Dakota, and South Dakota). The proposed program is consistent with the format of standard MBA programs elsewhere. The notable features of the proposed program are - (a) It has a strong emphasis on quantitative decision making (b) It emphasizes the relevance of superior communication skills in management (c) It has a dedicated emphasis on ethics and social responsibility in decision making. (d) It can be taken on both a part-time or full-time basis. The University offers a Master of Public Administration through the Department of Political Science. The Department has been informed of this proposal. The College of Business believes the student population for the MBA program is different from the students seeking the MPA degree. A memorandum of ”qualified support” from the Dr. Brian Cherry, Department Head, has been received. (iv) Accreditation Required – No accreditation is required for this program. However, the College will seek accreditation from AACSB International – the accrediting body for business programs, in the next accrediting period. This will be in 2015-16. AACSB works in a 10 year cycle with a mid-term review. The MBA program will be eligible for review in 2015-16. (v) Programmatic Listing in the Graduate Bulletin – The program will appear in the Graduate Bulletin thus - Master of Business Administration (MBA) Contact Information Address: College of Business 304 Cohodas Hall Phone: 906-227-2947 Fax: 906-227-2605 Web Address: www.nmu.edu/MBA E-mail: MBA@nmu.edu MBA Program Director: MBA at NMU - The College of Business offers a graduate program leading to the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. The primary objective of this program is to educate future, middle and senior managers to deal with the essential problems of choice, complexity and change in the challenging environment of business. The program is designed to develop critical thinking and analytical skills which the manager can use to take effective decisions and solve
  • 4. 4 organizational problems in a profit-oriented, free enterprise economy. Therefore, the program’s focus is directed toward decision making. The courses in the MBA are taught by faculty in the College. Classroom instruction is supplemented by visiting business practitioners who provide valuable perspectives and important networking opportunities. The program can be completed on a full-time or part-time basis. Program Requirements - The program consists of a minimum of 40 credit hours of graduate study. The core MBA consists of 10 courses of four credits each. The courses are – BUS 500 Managerial Communication BUS 510 Business Law and Ethics BUS 520 Management Information Systems BUS 530 Organizations: Structure, Behavior and Human Performance BUS 540 Marketing Strategy BUS 550 Business Statistics BUS 560 Quantitative Decision Making BUS 570 Managerial Accounting BUS 580 Financial Analysis and Management BUS 590 Strategic Management Every MBA student must complete a strategic analysis research project and report in the capstone course, BUS 590. In addition two courses will be available to add flexibility to the program in case special topics or visiting professional/academics are available to provide unique opportunities for the MBA students. BUS 595 Special Topics in Business Administration BUS 598 Directed Studies in Business Administration The MBA capstone course is a very important component of the graduate education experience. Graduate students are required to develop a detailed and comprehensive analysis of a company and design strategies to improve its effectiveness. Both for-profit and not-for-profit companies are acceptable. It may be possible that companies to be studied are from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Businesses outside the Upper Peninsula can be assigned from the Global On-Line MBA resource data base, with the permission of the instructor. The strategic analysis project will consist of a research investigation, an analysis of the findings and a plan to reposition the company into the future. The strategic analysis will include the following steps. Develop a Diagnosis. A macro environmental analysis is first conducted to investigate the current state of the economy and the nature of the industry of the company.
  • 5. 5 Develop a Prognosis. The chosen company is examined to evaluate its history, its strengths, its weaknesses, its opportunities and its threats. Its current standing and key indicators of its performance are projected into the future to determine where it is heading. Develop Objectives. The student must decide where the company should be heading. The student’s research and creativity will evolve new objectives for the company to achieve. Develop Strategies. The student must develop concrete strategies that will help to achieve the new objectives. Develop Tactics. The student must develop the operational and action plans that will be instituted to begin to evolve the strategies. Develop Controls. The student must design the checkpoints and standards that have to be met to assess the degree of achievement of the strategic plan and to take corrective action. The Strategic Analysis Research Project and Report will be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies. Prerequisites - Several of the courses in the MBA program require undergraduate prerequisites. At Northern Michigan University, the following courses meet these prerequisites: Accounting ACT 230 and ACT 240, Economics EC 201, Finance FIN 351, Marketing MKT 230, Management MGT 240, Information Systems CIS 212, Managerial Communications MGT 344, Operations Management MGT 325, and Statistics MA 171. (Note that some of these courses may also have prerequisites. MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105 is a prerequisite to MA 171; CIS 112 is a prerequisite to CIS 212). Relevant professional experience may be substituted for some of the prerequisite Courses. Decisions regarding the acceptability of proposed substitutes for prerequisite courses will be made by the MBA Program Director. Students can enter the program during the academic year. Admissions Requirements - Applicants are required to comply with the regular admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies. In addition, applicants are expected to have a GMAT score of 500 or higher. Applicants are required to write an essay indicating why they wish to pursue this degree. The results of the GMAT, the applicant’s undergraduate grade-point average, relevant work experience, and the essay will be evaluated together to determine admission into the program. Application materials are reviewed by the MBA Program Director and a three person faculty graduate screening committee. Applications are accepted throughout the year. Those interested in further information should contact the MBA Program Director, College of Business, Northern Michigan University, 300 Cohodas Hall, Marquette, 1401 Presque Isle Avenue, Marquette, Michigan 49855. (906) 227-2947.
  • 6. 6 Plan of Study - Upon admission, students will consult with the MBA program director to outline their course of study and select appropriate courses. (vi) Admission Requirements Applicants are required to comply with the regular admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies. In addition, applicants are expected to have: • A GMAT score of 500 or higher. Applicants are required to write an essay indicating why they wish to pursue this degree. The results of the GMAT, the applicant’s undergraduate grade-point average, and the essay will be evaluated together to determine admission into the program. (vii) Requirements for completing the program Students will need to complete the 10 courses (40 credits) of the MBA program with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or better and complete the research project in BUS 590 Strategic Management, the capstone course. (viii) Course outlines The outlines of the ten new courses, including Graduate Bulletin descriptions are provided below. (ix) Projected enrollment There is demand for this degree in this region. In addition, there are no other ready providers of this program here. Based on assessment of demand, extant faculty capacity to deliver courses and University guidelines on course enrollment minimums, the program anticipates enrolling 20 students in Year 1, 30 students in Year 2, and 40 students in Year 5. The program will be reviewed annually and suspended or terminated after the fifth year if adequate progress is not measured. (x) Anticipated costs over the next three years Staff - The College’s existing faculty will staff the courses that will be offered. The College has sufficient numbers of academically and professionally qualified faculty to teach the courses in the program. The number of courses to be offered in any semester will vary from 2 to 4. The following chart shows the projected offering of courses and hence faculty needs for three years (assuming a Fall semester start date) – Year 1 Fall 2 courses 2 faculty overloads $13,000 approximately
  • 7. 7 Winter 2 courses 2 faculty overloads $13,000 approximately Year 2 Fall 4 courses 4 faculty overloads $26,000 approximately Winter 2 courses 2 faculty overloads $13,000 approximately Year 3 Fall 4 courses 4 faculty overloads $26,000 approximately Winter 2 courses 2 faculty overloads $13,000 approximately Note that overload costs depend on a faculty’s salary and the actual amount will be what a particular faculty member earns. The numbers provided here are based on an average of $6,500 for a 4 credit overload course. Also note that in many cases, an adjunct faculty may be substituted as appropriate and they would be less expensive. Actual costs are likely to be lower. The program will be managed by a faculty member with 4 credits released time annually. There may be a need for adjunct faculty or overloads to cover the course provided as administrative release time. The estimated overload cost is $6,500. Depending on the faculty member filling this position and availability of appropriately qualified faculty, adjunct faculty may be hired and they are less expensive. The cost of overloads/adjuncts will be paid out of tuition revenues generated by the University through enrollment in this program. Equipment and Supplies - The program will require the production of brochures and informational materials and advertising/publicity. None of the courses need any specialized equipment. Anticipated annual expenses for publicity, materials, and supplies are $5,000. This cost will be borne by the College out of its regular budget. Some of the courses will need videos/CDs for instructional purposes. They are: BUS 500 Managerial Communications and BUS 530 Organizations: Structure, Behavior, and Human Resources. The estimated costs of videos/CDs are $1,000 and $2,500 respectively. This total of $3,500 will be borne by the College of Business through its normal budget for instruction. Library - The University’s extant holdings are sufficient to meet the instructional requirements of this program. It should be noted that more and more materials are available on the web and accessible on-line. The Library already subscribes to several on-line databases commonly used for business studies and research. Some materials will be available through inter-library loans. For the courses proposed, the instructors have expressed satisfaction with the resources of the Library. Space - There are no additional space requirements for classrooms. Office space is currently available in Cohodas Hall to house the office of the director.
  • 8. 8 The costs will be met through tuition revenues generated from students registering for courses in the program and from normal College of Business operating budget. (xi) Available faculty competencies The College currently has the appropriately qualified faculty to teach every one of the courses proposed for this program. The following table shows faculty credentials by course number – BUS 500 Claudia Orr Ph.D. Professor Communication BUS 510 Margaret Vroman J.D. Assistant Professor Law BUS 520 David Helton Ph.D. Associate Professor Information Systems BUS 530 Carol Steinhaus Ph.D. Associate Professor Organizational Behavior BUS 540 Gary Brunswick Ph.D. Professor Marketing BUS 550 Gary Stark Ph.D. Assistant Professor Research Methods BUS 560 James Drosen Ph.D. Associate Professor Decision Sciences BUS 570 Kenneth Janson Ph.D. Professor Accounting BUS 580 Charles Rayhorn Ph.D. Professor Finance BUS 590 Bruce Sherony Ph.D. Professor Management (xii) Equipment Available and Needed This program does not require any additional or specialized equipment. (xiii) Library Three types of library resources are required for the MBA program. They are books, journals, and electronic databases. The Library has built up a collection of materials in the business and management area that is sufficient to support the needs of faculty and students in this program. The Library subscribes to several on-line data bases. Note that more and more information, especially current reports, are now posted and accessible on the web. The College actively consulted with Mr. Michael Strahan, who serves as the Library’s liaison with the College of Business in determining library resources to support this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. For access to resources not available at the library, the new patron-initiated MeLCat service is an excellent alternative for borrowing books, videos, etc. (not periodical articles). It is faster and easier than traditional interlibrary loan. Although interlibrary loan and document delivery service is available for more specialized periodical articles, these services do not replace journal subscriptions. Faculty who have developed the courses for this program have expressed satisfaction with the library holdings. Space availability
  • 9. 9 Existing classrooms will meet the needs of initiating an MBA program. Space is required for housing the office of the director of the program; such space is currently available in Cohodas Hall where the College of Business faculty and administrative offices are located. (xiv) Teacher training Not applicable (xv) When will this program be taught? The program will be initially delivered during the academic year (Fall and Winter semesters). The courses will be offered in the evenings. (xvi) Planned Implementation Date Winter 2010; the College would like to offer the first two courses (8 credits) in the Winter semester of 2010.
  • 10. 10 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 500 Managerial Communication a. Bulletin Description BUS 500 Managerial Communication 4 credit hours Prerequisite: MGT 344 or instructor permission Students will improve their abilities to communicate orally and in writing as managers both to internal and external audiences. Through analyses and practice of communication strategies adopted by successful business professionals, students learn to write clearly and concisely, improve interpersonal and team competencies, deliver compelling oral presentations, construct effective arguments, and communicate effectively across various cultures. b. Rationale Recent research findings provide the most compelling support for a required communications course in the MBA program: • The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) researched characteristics employers seek in job candidates. Number 1 was communication skills.1
  • 11. 11 • Young Executive magazine surveyed 6,000 people and found that the most annoying habit of American bosses was poor communication.2 • A survey of 200 corporate vice presidents reported they spend the equivalent of nearly three months a year writing correspondence and reports.3 • A survey of 1,000 white- and blue-collar workers found that the most frequent cause of workplace resentment and misunderstandings is poor communication.4 • A survey of Fortune 500 human resource directors found that (a) reading and following directions, (b) listening and following directions, and (c) communication are the most essential skills for today’s workplace.5 • Results of a Robert Half survey of 1,000 of the largest employers in the U.S. revealed that 96 percent of executives said that today’s employees must have good communication skills to advance professionally.6 Bill Valentino, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility for Bayer China, contributes a monthly column called MBA Toolkit For CSR to the PRC based magazine China CSR. As a business executive, adjunct professor and consultant, Valentino emphasizes the need for graduate-level study in communication, “Business communication has become an important topic included in the MBA curricula of many universities because in business, it is essential to have good clear channels of communications. Communicating is as much a matter of human relationships as it is about transmitting facts. Good communication skills develop good relationships, and relationships are essential for successful business.”7 Rupal Jain, lecturer at Mumbai Atharva Institute of Management Studies, reinforces the necessity of communication skills. Jain explains, “In business, effective communication is a must at interdepartmental, intradepartmental and at external level . . . In business, communication supports all the functions of management.”8 Another communications expert, Cheryl Hamilton, explains, “As Americans continue their concern with declining productivity in the workplace, large and small organizations must realize the productivity of an organization begins with the productivity of its individual members. The importance of communication skills to both individual and organizational productivity has become a major organizational concern. Managers and employees who possess communication skills have fewer misunderstandings, make fewer mistakes, create less waste, and deal with disagreements more effectively. Thus, they produce more for their organization.9 In today’s business environment, words have more importance and power than ever before. Modern technology rather than decreasing the amount of writing and reading required of employees, has added to it. The importance of the spoken word may equal the written. Business people use speaking and listening skills in a wide spectrum of activities
  • 12. 12 throughout the workday. Whether writing or speaking, most business people cannot carry out their job responsibilities successfully without the ability to communicate effectively. Professionals have begun to realize the overwhelming importance of interpersonal communication on the job. Clearly, everyday face-to-face interpersonal communication skills can make the difference between success and failure, between sale and no sale, between program adoption and lack of support, between moving up and being stuck, between subordinates who collaborate and subordinates who bicker. A manager’s ability to manage people, to work and to interact effectively with others, will significantly affect their professional success. c. Course Number The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. d. Course Credits This will be a full semester course meeting the equivalent of four hours per week. Four credit hours is necessary for students to achieve the course objectives and to develop the communication competencies expected of MBA graduates. e. Course Outline See attached f. Course Objectives See attached Outline g. Staffing Dr. Claudia Orr teaches MGT 344, Managerial Communications, the undergraduate course in the College of Business, required by all COB majors. She previously taught graduate level courses at NMU and in spring 2009, was approved for graduate teaching status. h. Equipment and Supplies A need exists for Media Services to record student oral presentations using Mediasite. Media Services has this technology in the distance education room (LRC). However, if the room is used during the day/time of the course, additional costs will be incurred to bring the equipment to our classroom. i. Library and Required Readings Adequate. 12
  • 13. 13 j. Costs • Mediasite costs as stated in (h) above. • Purchase current DVDs (approximately $1,000). Examples include: o How to Say It: What do the best managers have in common? The ability to communicate. ($129; Kantola Productions) o Communication Skills for Project and Team Management. ($199; Insight Media) o Be Prepared for Meetings: How to make your meetings twice as productive. (106.95; Kantola Productions) o Communicating With Tact, Candor, and Credibility. ($149; Insight Media) o Better Meeting Management for Better Communication. ($169; Insight Media) o The Team Approach: How to set up high-performance teams and be a contributor to team success. (106.95; Kantola Productions) o Breakthrough Listening: Develop good communication skills – by becoming a better listener. ($149; Kantola Productions) o Getting Ahead by Getting Along: People Skills for the Workplace. ($129; Kantola Productions) o Resolving Conflicts in the Workplace. ($106.95; Kantola Productions) o Facilitative Leadership: Teamwork, Planning, and Conflict Management. ($169; Insight Media) o Killer Presentation Skills: Everything You Need to Know. ($139; Insight Media) o Body Language: Beyond Words. ($139; Insight Media) k. Effects on Other Departments None l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Fall 2010 or Winter 2011 13
  • 14. 14 BUS 500, Managerial Communication Proposed Outline Description Students will improve their abilities to communicate orally and in writing as managers both to internal and external audiences. Through analyses and practice of communication strategies adopted by successful business professionals, students learn to write clearly and concisely, improve interpersonal and team competencies, deliver compelling oral presentations, construct effective arguments, and communicate effectively across various cultures. Prerequisites • MBA Foundation Textbook(s) may be selected from the following: Alfred, G., Brusaw, C. & Oliu, W. (2008). The Business Writer’s Companion. Bedford/St. Martin’s. Alfred, G., Brusaw, C. & Oliu, W. (2009). The Business Writer’s Handbook. Bedford/St. Martin’s. Kolin, P. (2007). Successful Writing at Work. Houghton-Mifflin. O’Rourke, J. (2007). The Business Communication Casebook: A Notre Dame Collection. South- Western Cengage Learning. O’Rourke, J. and Yarbrough, B. (2009). Leading Groups and Teams, Managerial Communication Series, Module 1. South-Western Cengage Learning. O’Rourke, J., Sedlack, R., Shwom, B. & Keller, K. (2009). Graphics and Visual Communication for Managers, Managerial Communication Series, Module 2. South-Western Cengage Learning. O’Rourke, J. and Collins, S. (2009). Managing Conflict and Workplace Relationships, Managerial Communication Series, Module 3. South-Western Cengage Learning. O’Rourke, J. and Tuleja, E. (2009). Intercultural Communication for Business, Managerial Communication Series, Module 4. South-Western Cengage Learning. O’Rourke, J. and Collins, S. (2009). Interpersonal Communication: Listening and Responding, Managerial Communication Series, Module 5. South-Western Cengage Learning. O’Rourke, J. and Karlson, C. (2009). Writing and Presenting a Business Plan, Managerial Communication Series , Module 6. South-Western Cengage Learning. 14
  • 15. 15 O’Rourke, J. and Collins, S. (2009). Persuasion, Managerial Communication Series, Module 7. South-Western Cengage Learning. Robbins, S. & Hunsaker, P. (2009). Training in Interpersonal Skills: TIPS for Managing People at Work. Pearson Prentice-Hall. Schultz, H. (2006). Business Scenarios: A Context-Based Approach to Business Communication. Mc-Graw-Hill. Walker, R. (2006). Strategic Business Communication: An Integrated, Ethical Approach. South- Western. Course Objectives 1. Demonstrate effective written business communication skills. 2. Develop self-awareness of communication style. 3. Demonstrate effective communication when leading groups and teams. 4. Demonstrate effective strategies for managing individual and team conflict. 5. Demonstrate effective oral techniques in informal interactions and formal presentations. 6. Develop effective graphic and visual images to support and enhance presentations. 7. Construct effective arguments. 8. Analyze relationships between culture and communication, identity and power. 9. Evaluate listening effectiveness and demonstrate active, empathic listening techniques. 10. Apply ethical standards to management communication. 11. Conduct meetings effectively through application of meeting management principles. 12. Demonstrate decision-making and problem solving skills using case study scenarios. Course Structure The past decade has produced a growing body of evidence supporting the use of small group- based instructional methods for achieving successful educational outcomes in higher education. In addition, employers consistently cite teamwork skills as one of the top skills needed by employees. Therefore, this course will use team learning to promote active involvement. Team learning includes: 1) grading based on a combination of individual performance, team performance, and peer evaluation; 2) class time devoted to small group activities; and 3) a 5-step instructional activity sequence, repeated several times throughout the semester. This approach makes it possible to focus the majority of class time on helping students develop the ability to use concepts as opposed to simply learning about them. 5-Step Instructional Activity Sequence 15
  • 16. 16 1. Individual Study 2. Class Discussion and Exercises 3. Individual Mini-test 4. Group Mini-test 5. Peer Evaluation Activities and Evaluation To accomplish the course objectives, students will participate in and be evaluated on the following activities: 1. Teamwork. You will become a member of a team. The performance of teams will be evaluated in three major areas and will be a part of your grade: individual performance, team performance, and group maintenance. 2. Individual and Team Mini-tests. Much of the core conceptual material will be presented in an examination format. On assigned dates, you will complete a mini-test. Then your team will retake the mini-test together. You will receive both an individual grade and a team grade. Three mini-tests will be given. 3. Oral Presentation. You will make a 10-minute oral presentation on an assigned topic. Your presentation will be recorded and your classmates and the professor will provide feedback. You will then write a self-evaluation memo. Your professor will grade the presentation and memo. 4. Team Project. Your team will complete an organizational communication audit. Your team will select an organization to study, plan, and conduct the audit. This project will require you to administer surveys, possibly conduct interviews and compose correspondence with the employees of the organization, prepare a written report and make an oral team presentation of your findings. Work for this project will primarily be done outside of class with periodic progress sessions during class. 5. Team Application Exercises. Six team assignments will be made throughout the semester (approximately one assignment every two weeks) to be completed in teams. Primarily, these exercises will consist of case studies where your team will analyze a situation, write a response, and present your response orally. During these exercises, you will be required to demonstrate individual and team communication skills including leading and coaching. Written and oral presentation skills will also be assessed. Team members will share the grades equally on these assignments. 6. Individual Exercises. Individual assignments will typically focus on improving your writing skills. One individual assignment will be due each class session. 7. Peer Evaluation. Your team members will evaluate you based on your participation, leadership, helpfulness, preparation, contribution, and demonstrated expertise in your team. Peer evaluations will be conducted periodically throughout the semester to provide you feedback. Your grade for peer evaluation will be part of your final course grade. 8. Individual Exam. A comprehensive exam will be given during exam week and will be taken individually. 16
  • 17. 17 Course Requirements 1. You learn and grow by listening, as well as experiencing and participating. You must read the assigned material before coming to class to participate fully in the class activities. Much of what occurs as learning will result from active participation in team interactions, which cannot be duplicated. Therefore, you are expected to attend all classes. 2. You cannot make up missed in-class exercises. 3. You must type all assignments in proper business format. You must use appropriate English for competency in business communication. I assume you have achieved a high level of English competency by this point in your education. Carefully proofread all written assignments to avoid losing points for mechanical and typographical errors. You should know the mechanics of business writing and the basic rules of grammar. 4. Rubrics are provided for every assignment. When you submit your assignments, turn them in with the rubric sheet attached. 5. Late assignments are not accepted. Grading Mini-tests (3) 15% Oral Presentation 10% Team Application Exercises (6) 10% Individual Exercises (14) 15% Team Project 30% Peer Evaluation 10% Individual Exam 10% Total 100% Tentative Schedule Week Topic 1 Course Overview Business Writing 2 Business Writing: Letters, Memos, Electronic 3 Business Writing: Business Plan 4 Communication Styles 5 Interpersonal Communication 17
  • 18. 18 6 Leading Groups and Teams 7 Managing Conflict and Workplace Relationships 8 Managing Conflict and Workplace Relationships (continued) 9 Oral Presentation Techniques Graphics and Visual Communication 10 Intercultural Communication 11 Ethics in Communication 12 Meeting Management 13 Final Team Case Study 14 Final Team Case Study 15 Final Exam Academic Dishonesty Students should strive to obtain the highest possible level of academic achievement. You have an obligation to abide by accepted standards of academic honesty. In cases where there are reasonable grounds to suspect a student of academic dishonesty, as defined in the Student Code in Section 2.2.3, appropriate corrective action will be taken. Academic honesty includes, but is not limited to, activities such as cheating or plagiarism (submitting as one’s own work that contains ideas or materials taken from another without full acknowledgement of the author and source). ADA Statement If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the Disability Services Office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock (227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. Nondiscrimination Statement Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. 18
  • 19. 19 WORKS CITED 1. Faridah, A., Anderson, M.A. & Baker, C.M. “Entry-level information services and support personnel: Needed workplace and technology skills.” Delta Pi Epsilon Journal, (2006), 45, p. 55. 2. “It’s All Just Bossiness.” Indianapolis Star, 4 April 1992, p. C3. 3. “Mediocre Memos.” Detroit Free Press, 26 May 1990, p. 9A. 4. “Speak the Language.” Indianapolis Star, 30 January 1991, p. A9. 5. “Workplace Literacy.” USA Today, 21 September 1992, p. B1. 6. Lesikar, R.V., Flately, M.E. & Rentz, K. (2008). Business Communication: Making Connections in a Digital World, 11th ed. McGraw-Hill. p. 3. 7. Valentino, B. (2007, April 12). “MBA Toolkit for CSR: Corporate Communications.” Retrieved December 3, 2008 from http://www.chinacsr.com/en/2007/04/12/1217-mba- toolkit-for-csr-corporate-communications/ 8. Jain R. “Effective Business Communication Tips.” Retrieved December 3, 2008 from http:// www.123oye.com/job-articles/business-corporates/communication-tips.htm 9. Hamilton, C. & Parker, C. (2008). Communication for Results: A Guide for Business and the Professions. 4th ed., Belmont, CA: Cengage. 19
  • 20. 20 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 510 Business Law and Ethics a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 510 Business Law and Ethics 4 credit hours Prerequisite: None This course examines corporate culture, corporate governance, stakeholder responsibility, social responsibility, legal rules and the importance of business ethics in a global economy. Students will become acquainted with the theoretical basis of business ethics: stakeholder- theory, theories of responsibility and normative ethical theory and intercultural ethics. They will learn the characteristics of ethical issues in business and acquire the ability to solve an ethical problem using the decision-making process. The course will result in the ability to create and defend a corporate ethics program. (ii) None (iii) Bus Law Ethics (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? Ethics is an inescapable part of the decision-making process of every business manager. All business organizations must deal with ethical and moral dilemmas as well as the legal consequences of their decisions in this regard. As such, the ability to identify ethical issues and proactively develop a corporate ethics program that addresses them is an essential part of any successful enterprise. This course responds to that need and provides the knowledge and skills necessary for graduate students to identify ethical issues and respond appropriately and legally. As a required course in the MBA program it will be part of a well-rounded advanced business curriculum, which upon completion will provide MBA graduates with the knowledge and tools necessary to be exemplary corporate stewards. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. 20
  • 21. 21 (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “apply sound decision techniques in an ethical manner to management situations.” (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no prerequisites and can be taken at any stage in the program. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Students should be able to demonstrate: 1. A mastery of theoretical concepts of business ethics. 2. The ability to identify ethical characteristics of business situations and business decisions. 3. An understanding of the role the individual plays in creating an ethically sound organization. 4. Knowledge of the laws and regulations proscribing ethical behavior. 5. Knowledge of the resources and tools for protecting business assets, resolving legal conflicts, and complying with the law. 6. Knowledge of the steps to take when whistle blowing. 7. The ability to solve an ethical problem using the decision-making process. 8. Intercultural awareness and a comprehension of ethical issues in a global economy. 9. The ability to express and defend a considered moral position and to present ethical views orally to their peers. 21
  • 22. 22 10. The ability to describe the benefit of business ethics to all stakeholders. 11. The ability to develop, present and defend an effective corporate ethics program. g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has professionally qualified faculty in Dr. Margaret Vroman, JD, Assistant Professor of Business Law, to teach this course. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Professor Vroman has indicated that the library resources are adequate to meet the needs of this course. See attached course syllabus for required readings. j. How will you meet these costs? There are no additional expenses to support this course. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Winter or Fall 2010 22
  • 23. 23 BUS 510 Business Law and Ethics Proposed Syllabus Instructor: Margaret Vroman, JD Office: 310D Cohodas E-mail: mvroman@nmu.edu Phone: 906-227-1865 Required Texts Understanding Business Ethics Stanwick & Stanwick ISBN-10-013173542X Publisher: Pearson Copyright: 2009 Case Studies in Business Ethics Al Gini, Alexei M. Marcoux ISBN-10: 0132424320 ISBN-13: 9780132424325 Publisher: Prentice Hall Copyright: 2009 Additional readings available on the Internet will be assigned throughout the course. Prerequisites - There are no prerequisites for this course. COURSE DESCRIPTION This course examines corporate culture, corporate governance, stakeholder responsibility, social responsibility, legal rules and the importance of business ethics in a global economy. Students will become acquainted with the theoretical basis of business ethics: stakeholder-theory, theories of responsibility and normative ethical theory and intercultural ethics. They will learn the characteristics of ethical issues in business and acquire the ability to solve an ethical problem using the decision-making process. The course will result in the ability to create and defend a corporate ethics program. COURSE OBJECTIVES The purpose of the course is to communicate theoretical and practical insight into organizational ethics as well as knowledge of the legal regulations governing corporate conduct. Woven throughout the course will be discussions of the legal rules governing ethical issues in all business disciplines and the consequences of violating these rules. The ability to create a proactive ethics program for a corporate entity that synthesizes all topics covered will be the culmination of the course. Students who successfully complete this course should be able to demonstrate: 23
  • 24. 24 1. A mastery of basic theoretical concepts of business ethics. 2. The ability to identify ethical characteristics of business situations and business decisions. 3. An understanding of the role the individual plays in creating an ethically sound organization. 4. Knowledge of the laws and regulations proscribing ethical behavior. 5. Knowledge of the resources and tools for protecting business assets, resolving legal conflicts, and complying with the law. 6. Knowledge of the steps to take when whistle blowing. 7. The ability to solve an ethical problem using the decision-making process. 8. Intercultural awareness and a comprehension of ethical issues in a global economy. 9. The ability to express and defend a considered moral position and to present ethical views orally to peers. 10. The ability to describe the benefit of business ethics to all stakeholders. 11. The ability to develop, present and defend an effective corporate ethics program. STUDENT EVALUATION WILL BE BASED ON THE FOLLOWING: • 10% Research of current topics related to business ethics in local, national, and international media sources and classroom presentation of them. • 40% Written examinations (2 essay exams worth 20% each). • 40% Development of a written corporate ethics program. • 10% Class presentation and defense of corporate ethics program. CLASS SCHEDULE Week1: Ethical Decisions A. Why study business ethics B. The development of business ethics standards, values, ideals, and principles C. The benefit of business ethics D. Basics of business ethics E. Balancing personal and organizational ethics F. Identifying common ethical dilemmas G. Making ethical decisions H. Discussing ethical decision-making I. Overcoming barriers in the decision-making process Week 2: Defining Business Ethics Issues A. Identifying stakeholders 24
  • 25. 25 B. Honesty and fairness C. Conflicts of interest D. What is fraud? E. Discrimination F. Information technology Week 3: Whistleblowing A. Whistleblowing criteria and risks B. Understanding whistle-blowing C. The whistleblowing legal process D. Recognizing when to blow the whistle E. Identifying whistleblowing guidelines F. Blowing the whistle legally Week 4: Managerial Ethics A. Ethical management B. Identifying the characteristics of ethical managers C. Ethical management D. Human resource issues and laws E. Subordinates ethical issues F. Ensuring ethical behavior G. Handling ethical dilemmas brought by subordinates Week 5: Developing an Effective Ethics Program A. The need for organizational ethics programs B. An effective ethics program C. The code of conduct D. The role of ethics officers E. Ethics training and communication F. Monitoring and enforcing ethical standards G. Continuous Improvement of the ethics program H. Pitfalls in designing and implementing an ethics program Week 6: Implementing and Auditing an Ethics Program A. Improving ethical decision making in business B. The ethics audit C. The auditing process D. The importance of ethics auditing EXAM Week 7: Ethical Decision-Making and Corporate Governance 25
  • 26. 26 A. The process of ethical decision making B. Corporate Governance C. Making informed ethical decisions Week 8: Unethical Behavior A. Recognizing unethical behavior B. Identifying sources of unethical behavior C. Preventing unethical behavior D. Ending unethical behavior E. Conducting an intervention meeting G. Promoting ethical behavior Week 9: Organizational Ethics A. Organizational ethics basics B. The need for organizational ethics C. Ethical principles D. Ethical principles of organizations E. Upholding ethical principles F. Ethical safeguards Week 10: Ethics and Social Responsibility A. Economic issues B. Competitive issues C. Legal and regulatory Issues D. Philanthropic Issues E. Ethics as a driver of social responsibility F. Corporate social responsibilities G. Identifying types of social responsibilities H. Handling conflicting social responsibilities Week 11: Ethics and the Environment A. Areas of environmental concern B. Environmental policies C. Environmental discrimination D. Environmental management Week 12: The Corporate Culture A. The role of corporate culture in ethical decision making B. The role of leadership in the corporate culture C. “The Group” within organizational structure and culture 26
  • 27. 27 D. Individual actions within the corporate culture EXAM Week 13: Business Ethics in a Global Economy A. Ethical perceptions in international business B. Global values C. The multinational corporation D. Ethical issues around the globe E. Bribery and corruption Week 14: Student Presentations of Corporate Ethics Program NMU’s Disability Policy If you need disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the Disability Services Office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock (227-1700, TTY 227-1543). Reasonable accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, and in accordance with federal, state and university guidelines. AAEO Statement Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. Academic Dishonesty Students should strive to obtain the highest possible level of academic achievement. This is not possible if you do not produce your own work product. Students are required to abide by the university’s standards of academic honesty. In cases where there are reasonable grounds to suspect a student of academic dishonesty, as defined in the Student Code in Section 2.2.3, appropriate action will be taken. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, activities such as cheating or plagiarism (submitting as one’s own work which contains ideas or materials taken from another without full acknowledgement of the author and source). 27
  • 28. 28 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 520 Management Information Systems a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 520 Management Information Systems 4 credit hours Prerequisite: CIS 212 or permission of instructor This course provides a managerial perspective of information technology within an organization. Students will explore how tactical, operational and strategic objectives of a business may be supported with information systems. They will explore how business functional areas may be integrated through information technology. In addition, they will study how an organization is impacted by economic, social, legal, and ethical aspects of this technology. (ii) CIS 112 is a prerequisite to CIS 212 (iii) Management Info Sys (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale: (i) Why is there a need for this new course? This course is a required core course in the MBA program. Companies expect managers to be able to leverage information technology for operational and strategic advantage, as emphasized in BUS 520 Management Information Systems. A comparable course is required for the MBA program in many of the region’s institutions accredited by our agency, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). See references below for MIS course in MBA programs: 1. W. Briggs & B. Shore “Competitive Analysis of MIS in the MBA Core,” Journal of Information Systems Education, April 1, 2007. 2. Novitzki, “The MIS Core Course,” in Proc. 12th International Academy for Information Management Conference, Atlanta, GA, December 12-14, 1997. 3.Rosenthal and L. Park, “Managing Information Systems Textbooks: Improving their Orientation toward Potential General Managers,” California State University, Los Angeles, 2008. 4. Siegmann and L. Brennan, "“Meeting the Challenge of Rapid Change: Re-engineering the MBA MIS Course,” Issues in Information Systems, Vol. II (2001). (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program? 28
  • 29. 29 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of … information systems …” (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no prerequisites and can be taken at any stage in the program. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives By the end of this course, the student should understand how 1. An organization’s operations may by facilitated through the effective use of information systems 2. Aspects of business strategies may be implemented through information technology 3. Business functional areas may be integrated through information systems 4. The company is impacted by economic, social, legal, and ethical aspects of information technology g. Staffing The College of Business has academically qualified faculty in Dr. David Helton, Associate Professor, to teach this course. He holds a Ph.D. in Business Administration (major in Management Information Systems) from Texas Tech University. He taught a graduate MIS course equivalent to BUS 520 in the MBA program at Chadron State 29
  • 30. 30 College in 1995 and 1998. He instructed other graduate MIS courses at the University of Colorado at Denver during 2000 and 2001. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and required readings In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Full-text articles on management information systems may be found within many of the library’s journals, such as Academy of Information and Management Sciences Journal, Communications of the ACM, Harvard Business Review, Journal of Cases on Information Technology, Journal of Digital Information Management, Management Information Systems Quarterly, and MIT Sloan Management Review. Students will be reading these journal articles to prepare abstracts and a research paper. The instructor will supplement cases studied from the textbook with other reading material from various sources. See attached course syllabus for required readings. j. Costs There is no additional cost associated with offering this course. k. Effects on other departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Fall 2011 or Winter 2012 30
  • 31. 31 CIS 520 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS Proposed Course Outline Instructor: Dr. David Helton Telephone: 227-2969 Email: dhelton@nmu.edu Office: 303B Cohodas Building Textbook G. Piccoli, Information Systems for Managers: Texts and Cases, Wiley, 2009. Additional readings will be assigned from articles in research and professional journals. Course Description Prerequisites: Admission to MBA program or instructor's permission. This course provides a managerial perspective of information technology within an organization. Students will explore how tactical, operational and strategic objectives of a business may be supported with information systems. They will explore how business functional areas may be integrated through information technology. In addition, they will study how an organization is impacted by economic, social, legal, and ethical aspects of this technology. Objectives By the end of this course, the student should understand how 1. an organization’s operations may by facilitated through the effective use of information systems 2. aspects of business strategies may be implemented through information technology 3. business functional areas may be integrated through information systems 4. the company is impacted by economic, social, legal, and ethical aspects of information technology Approach The course will include lectures, case studies, group activities, presentations by individuals and/or groups, a research paper, and examinations. Evaluation: (1) Class Participation (10%) Besides individual presentations, students will participate in discussions and other classroom activities, throughout the semester. The student's contribution to these activities will be worth up to ten points of the final course grade. Since students not in class cannot participate in these discussions, unexcused absences will result in a lower class participation grade. (2) Abstracts (20%) Every student will complete and present to the class two abstracts of journal articles. Each abstract provides a polished summary and in-depth analysis of the particular research article. Each abstract should be from three to five pages in length and will be worth up to ten points of the final course grade. 31
  • 32. 32 (3) Research Paper (20%) Each student will complete a research paper on a topic introduced in the textbook. The paper should be from fifteen to twenty pages in length and follow consistently a single writing style, such as that stipulated by the APA. This paper will be worth up to twenty points of the final course grade. (4) Midterm Examination (25%) The midterm examination will cover the materials presented during the first half of the course. (5) Final Examination (25%) A final examination will cover the materials presented since the midterm examination. Attendance Policy Except for cases of illness or other urgent matters, students are expected to attend each class. Grading Scale Your grade will be based on the following: Class Participation 10 Points Abstracts 20 Points Research Paper 20 Points Midterm Examination 25 Points Final Examination 25 Points TOTAL 100 Points Grades for all activities will be made on a percentage scale, below, which gives the precise letter grade equivalency. A 93-100 A- 90-92 B+ 87-89 B 83-86 B- 80-82 C+ 77-79 C 73-76 C- 70-72 D+ 67-69 D 63-66 D- 60-62 F 0-59 32
  • 33. 33 NMU’s Non-Discrimination Statement Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. Disability Services If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services by coming into the Disability Services Office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock; calling 227-1700; or e-mailing disserv@nmu.edu. Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. CLASS SCHEDULE Week 1 Managerial View of Information Systems: Introduction Week 2 The Firm's IS as a Socio-Technical System Week 3 Supporting the Enterprise's Functional Areas through IT Week 4 Achieving Competitive Advantage through IT Week 5 Doing Business through Electronic Commerce Week 6 Managerial Decision Making through IT Week 7 Planning the Company's Use of IS Resources Week 8 Creating Value for the Business with IT Week 9 Corporate Data Resources Week 10 Supporting the Firm's Communication Needs through IT Week 11 Justifying the IT Investment 33
  • 34. 34 Week 12 Business Management Role in Development and Implementation Week 13 Corporate Concerns for IT Security and Ethics Week 14 Student Presentations of Research Papers Week 15 Final Examination 34
  • 35. 35 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 530 Organizations: Structure, Behavior, and Human Performance a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 530 Organizations: Structure, Behavior, and Human Performance 4 credit hours Prerequisite: MGT 240 (ii) None (iii) Orgn Strcture Behvr HR (iv) Not applicable This course is divided into three major components: micro organizational behavior, macro organizational behavior, and human resource management. Micro organizational behavior focuses on individual and group-level problems. The section on macro organizational behavior focuses on organizational level problems as they relate to improving organizational performance. The human resource management segment will focus on recruiting, selecting, evaluating, and disciplining employees. This course introduces some of the central topics in management theory, research, and practice and provides the basis for understanding and evaluating organizations and their management. b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? Hiring employees and staffing organizations in ways that are legal, ethical, and productive are key concepts in operating any organization. The difference between an outstanding organization and one that fails is often the motivation, decision-making, and commitment of the organization’s employees. Supervisors and managers must be able to communicate with employees in ways that result in motivated employees who are good decision makers and good team players. Virtually all AACSB-accredited MBA programs contain at least one course on hiring and managing employees. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement 35
  • 36. 36 This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “… understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of organization behavior …” (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no prerequisites though it is a prerequisite for the capstone BUS 590 course. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Understand how managers structure and design organizations. 2. Understand the role of management in the corporation and the types of skills needed to perform managerial work 3. Understand the fundamentals of individual behavior in organizations 4. Understand the ethical nature of managerial decision making and the international nature of business 5. Understand how to use communication, interpersonal relationships, and leadership skills to manage human resources in organizations g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has professionally qualified faculty in Dr. Carol Steinhaus, Associate Professor, with a Ph D. in Management (major in organizational behavior) from the University of Nebraska- Lincoln, to teach this course. h. Equipment and Supplies The course will need certain audio-visual materials which will have to be purchased. The approximate cost of $2,500 will be borne through the normal operational budget of the College of Business. 36
  • 37. 37 i. Library and Required Readings In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Dr. Steinhaus has indicated that existing NMU library resources are appropriate for this course. See attached course syllabus for required readings. j. How will you meet these costs? The cost of one-time purchase of audio-visual materials (approximately $2,500) will be borne through the normal operational budget of the College of Business. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Fall 2010 or Winter 2011 37
  • 38. 38 BUS 530 ORGANIZATIONS: Structure, Behavior, and Human Performance Course Outline Professor: Carol S. Steinhaus Associate Professor College of Business 309D Cohodas Hall 1401 Presque Isle Avenue Northern Michigan University 906 227-1849 csteinha@nmu.edu Bulletin Description This course is divided into three major components: micro organizational behavior, macro organizational behavior, and human resource management. Micro organizational behavior focuses on individual and group-level problems. The section on macro organizational behavior focuses on organizational level problems as they relate to improving organizational performance. The human resource management segment will focus on recruiting, selecting, evaluating, and disciplining employees. This course introduces some of the central topics in management theory, research, and practice and provides the basis for understanding and evaluating organizations and their management. Objectives Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 6. Understand how managers structure and design organizations. 7. Understand the role of management in the corporation and the types of skills needed to perform managerial work 8. Understand the fundamentals of individual behavior in organizations 9. Understand the ethical nature of managerial decision making and the international nature of business 10. Understand how to use communication, interpersonal relationships, and leadership skills to manage human resources in organizations Prerequisites MGT 240 Methods This course will be taught as a hybrid, with both face-to-face classes and work on the web. Either class will meet physically each week for 3 hours with the equivalent of 1 hour of work on the web (discussion boards, video analysis, sharing of student’s papers) OR there will be some weeks where class does not occur physically but work is done on the web. At this point, it is assumed that some work each week will be via computer, but that class will meet each week. This decision will be made with student input. 38
  • 39. 39 This course will include lectures, discussions, presentations from guest speakers, case analyses, videos, computer work, papers, and student presentations. Attendance Policy There is a proven relationship between class attendance and academic performance. I expect class participation, both in physical classes and in web activities. I will expect you to be in class on time, prepared, and focusing on doing the best job you can. This is a master’s level class and the expectations will be set at that level. Grading Policy Following the first week of class during which some key decisions will be made with student input, a form will be provided to each student on which s/he can keep track of the weighting scheme and his/her individual scores. Based on class input during the first week of class, a grading scheme will be developed regarding points for various activities, and then a standard grading scheme (90% = A; 80% = B, etc.) will be developed. Late work will be accepted but will be penalized. There will be required weekly papers. Each paper must be typed and will focus on a current business journal article, no older than 2 years, that focuses on the topic of the week. The article’s contents must be summarized in one page, and the student will relate how the article relates to the week’s topic, what the article adds to course content, etc., in the succeeding pages. Papers will generally be at least 4 pages long and will focus on the higher levels of Bloom’s taxonomy of learning (analysis and synthesis) Students will present their papers to class members in a 5 minute presentation each week. Items included in the grading scheme will be a mid-term and a final test, class participation, discussion board activities, and weekly papers. Tests must account for at least 60% of the final grade. The weighting of other items will be determined by the group during the first class meeting. Academic Dishonesty Students should strive to obtain the highest possible level of academic achievement. You have n obligation to abide by accepted standards of academic honesty. In cases where there are reasonable grounds to suspect a student of academic dishonesty, as defined in the Student Code in Section 2.2.3, appropriate corrective action will be taken. Academic honesty includes, but is not limited to, activities such as cheating or plagiarism (submitting as one’s own work that contains ideas or materials taken from another without full acknowledgement of the author and source. NMU Disability Policy If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services Office at 2001 Hedgcock (phone 227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. 39
  • 40. 40 NMU Non-Discrimination Statement NMU does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906 227-2420. Textbooks: Several possibilities, such as: Robbins, S. P. (2005). Organizational behavior. Pearson Prentice Hall. Robbins, S. P. (2007) The truth about managing people. Pearson Prentice Hall Bohlander and Snell (2007) Managing Human Resources. Thomson Southwestern Yukl, G. A. (2006) Leadership in Organizations. Pearson Prentice Hall TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF TOPICS Week 1 Class overview Management history (scientific, administrative, human relations) Organizational structure issues Possible Reading---Foundations of Organization Structure, Chapter 15, Robbins Week 2 Organizational Behavior, Individual Differences and Learning Styles Possible Reading--- What is Organizational Behavior---Chapter 1, Robbins Foundations of Individual Behavior, Chapter 2, Robbins Learning Styles activity Presentation of weekly papers Week 3 Personality, Values, and Attitudes Possible Reading--- 40
  • 41. 41 Values, Attitudes, and Job Satisfaction, Chapter 3, Robbins Personality and Emotions, Chapter 4, Robbins Big 5 personality activity Presentation of weekly papers Week 4 Perception and Individual Decision Making Possible Reading Perception and Individual Decision Making, Chapter 5, Robbins Perception activities and decision-making exercises Presentation of weekly papers Week 5 Motivation theories and history Possible Reading Basic Motivation Concepts, Chapter 6, Robbins Case analyses of motivation problems Presentation of weekly papers Week 6 Current motivation applications Possible Reading Motivation: From Concepts to Applications Case analyses of motivation problems provided by students Presentation of weekly papers Week 7 Midterm---Test #1 Week 8 41
  • 42. 42 Groups and Teams Possible Reading Foundations of Group Behavior, Chapter 8 Robbins Understanding Work Teams, Chapter 9 Robbins Group/team experiential activities Weekly paper presentations Week 9 Leadership Possible Reading Basic Approaches to Leadership, Chapter 11, Robbins Experiential activities Case analyses of students’ leadership issues at work Weekly paper presentations Week 10 More current leadership issues Possible Reading Contemporary Issues in Leadership, Chapter 12, Robbins Experiential activities Weekly paper presentations Week 11 Power, politics, and conflict management Possible Reading Power and Politics, Chapter 13, Robbins Conflict and Negotiation, Chapter 14, Robbins Conflict management experiential activities 42
  • 43. 43 Weekly paper presentations Week 12 Organizational culture Possible Reading Organizational Culture, Chapter 16, Robbins Weekly paper will require an analysis of students’ own workplaces or previous workplaces, using key issues such as stories, rituals, symbols, etc. Week 13 Equal Employment and Job Analysis of Human Resource Management Possible Reading Equal Employment Opportunity, Chapter 3, Bohlander and Snell Job Analysis, Employee Involvement, and Flexible work Schedules, Chapter 4, Bohlander and Snell In-class analysis activities Week 14 Employee Selection, Evaluation, and Discipline Possible Reading Employee Selection, Chapter 6, Bohlander and Snell Appraising and Improving Performance, Chapter 8, Bohlander and Snell Employee Rights and Discipline, Chapter 13, Bohlander and Snell Week 15 Final exam _______________________________________________________________________ 43
  • 44. 44 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 540 Marketing Strategy a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 540 Marketing Strategy 4 credit hours Prerequisite: MKT 230 This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the process of developing and implementing marketing strategy. Through the use of strategy-related readings, cases, applied exercises and a course project, students will develop and refine strategic marketing planning and problem-solving skills. (ii) Not applicable (iii) Not applicable (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? Marketing is a basic and critical component of any successful business and/or non-profit organization, and as a result virtually all AACSB-accredited MBA programs contain some course (or integrated course content) related to marketing strategy. Marketing is an essential business function defined as the activity, set of institutions and processes for creating, communicating, delivering and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners and society at large (American Marketing Association 2007), and is a critical determinant of business success (or failure). BUS 540 will guide students through a classical and contemporary review of marketing strategy; more detailed information on the specific content of BUS 540 – Marketing Strategy is cited in item “e.” below and via the example syllabus included with this course proposal. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 3. This course is a component of the MBA program. 4. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement 44
  • 45. 45 This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of … marketing …” (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no graduate courses as prerequisites. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Attached to this proposal is an extensive course syllabus, which contains the course objectives. Specifically there are five (5) identified course objectives: 1. To expand and refine marketing decision-making skills based upon various constraints (i.e., resource, time, information, etc.) 2. To develop a disciplined approach to the analysis and evaluation of marketing problems and opportunities 3. To further enhance the student’s understanding of the role of marketing given the firm’s process of strategic planning, and to further appreciate how the elements of a successful marketing strategy and implementation plan fit together with one another 4. To instill the need to continuously update, monitor, review and evaluate current developments and trends in the areas of marketing strategy and implementation (e.g., E- commerce, International Marketing, ERP, CRM, Database Marketing, Marketing Metrics, Marketing Ethics and Strategy etc.) 5. To increase the quality of marketing decision-making by focusing upon how plans and implementation are communicated effectively within the organization. g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has academically qualified faculty in Dr. Gary Brunswick, Professor of Marketing, to teach this course. Dr. Brunswick holds a Ph.D. in Marketing from Arizona State University. h. Equipment and Supplies None 45
  • 46. 46 i. Library and Required Readings In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Dr. Brunswick has indicated existing NMU library resources will be appropriate for this course. See attached course syllabus for required readings. j. How will you meet these costs? There are no additional expenses to support this course. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Winter or Fall 2011 46
  • 47. 47 BUS 540 - Marketing Strategy Dr. Gary Brunswick Course Outline _______________________________________________________________________ Campus Network http://www-instruct.nmu.edu/~gbrunswi/BUS%20540/ (Course documents / files found in this folder) (NMU Instruct Server) Fall Semester 2010 Walker L. Cisler College of Business Northern Michigan University Marquette, Michigan _______________________________________________________________________ Time: 6:00 – 9:20 p.m. (80786) JH 243 Day: Thursday Professor: G. Brunswick, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing Office: 310E Cohodas E-Mail: gbrunswi@nmu.edu Telephone: 227-1261 Office Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 9:00 – 11:30 p.m. Thursday 4:00 – 5:45 p.m., and by appointment Textbook: Strategic Market Management by David A. Aaker (2007edition) _______________________________________________________________________ 47
  • 48. 48 Course Objectives and Direction -- Marketing Strategy is designed to equip students with a set of analytical tools and experiences designed to improve the quality of decision-making related to the development and implementation of marketing strategy. Through the use of strategy-related readings, cases, applied exercises and a course project, students will develop and refine strategic marketing planning and problem-solving skills. The objectives for this course include the following: 1. To expand and refine marketing decision-making skills based upon various constraints (i.e., resource, time, information, etc.). 2. To develop a disciplined approach to the analysis and evaluation of marketing problems and opportunities. 3. To further enhance the student’s understanding of the role of marketing given the firm’s process of strategic planning, and to further appreciate how the elements of a successful marketing strategy and implementation plan fit together with one another. 4. To instill the need to continuously update, monitor, review and evaluate current developments and trends in the areas of marketing strategy and implementation (e.g., E- commerce, International Marketing, ERP, CRM, Database Marketing, Marketing Metrics, Marketing Ethics and Strategy etc.) 5. To increase the quality of marketing decision-making by focusing upon how plans and implementation are communicated effectively within the organization. _______________________________________________________________________ Course Format -- Marketing Strategy utilizes a lecture / discussion format; however a high degree of responsibility for preparation and communication will be placed upon each student. Active participation by all students is an important part of the overall learning process, and is essential to the success of the course. Participation includes all forms of interaction between students and the professor (i.e., questions, comments, examples, etc.). Specific focus will be given to the quality of the comments made by each student. From an overall perspective, students are expected to be well-prepared for each class session, and should be able to make numerous quality comments. _______________________________________________________________________ Course Performance -- Performance responsibilities in this course fall into several basic areas: Written Cases (Individual and Team) 300 points Short Assignments 300 Participation 200 Marketing Strategy Briefing 50 Final Course Project /Presentation 150 ----- 48
  • 49. 49 Total 1000 points Written Cases – Students will be required to submit written analyses of a number of the cases in the course; individual as well as team cases will be assigned. Cases are due at the beginning of the class session on the assigned due date; late papers will not be accepted. Short Assignments – Students will be required to complete a number of short assignments related to course material at various points during the semester. Short assignments are due at the beginning of the class session on the assigned due date; late papers will not be accepted. Participation – Students will be evaluated on their individual contributions, as well as contributions via team presentations. Feedback on participation will be provided to each student sometime around the midsemester point, and at the end of the term. Marketing Strategy Briefing (MSB) – Each seminar participant will be responsible for presenting a recent (and significant) article related to marketing strategy; more information will be provided on the MSB in a separate handout. Final Course Project /Presentation - Each student will complete a comprehensive course project; course projects will entail completing a marketing plan for a firm (i.e., this could be your current employer) or conducting a detailed marketing strategy / implementation audit for a firm (i.e., again, this could be your current employer). Each student will conduct a professional-quality presentation of their course project; presentations will be scheduled for the last several class sessions. More information on the course project options will be provided in a separate handout later in the semester. Attendance - Given the format for this course and the heavy reliance upon participation by students, regular and punctual attendance will be considered normative behavior. Each student will be permitted to miss (1) one regular class sessions (or be late for 1 class session) without penalty; after a total of 1 is reached, the student's participation grade and (in turn) final letter grade will be directly (e.g., negatively) impacted. _______________________________________________________________________ Background Dr. Brunswick holds the following degrees: Ph.D. (1992) Business Administration (Marketing) Arizona State University M.B.A. (1986) Marquette University B.S. (1984) Marketing (Summa Cum Laude) Northern Michigan University A.D. (1981) Retailing and Sales Northern Michigan University 49
  • 50. 50 Dr. Brunswick has published his research in the following journals: Journal of Marketing (book review) Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science Journal of Consumer Behaviour The Marketing Management Journal The Journal of Professional Services Marketing The International Journal of Case Studies and Research The Journal of the International Academy of Case Studies The Academy of Educational Leadership Journal The Academy of Marketing Studies Journal Additionally, Dr. Brunswick has presented his research at over 30 research conferences in the United States, Canada, Scotland, Wales, China, and has guest lectured at universities in Finland, England, Germany and the Netherlands. His international teaching experiences include 3 separate courses taught at universities in Finland. His consulting experiences / grants are varied and substantial, and include organizations such as the First Interstate Center for Services Marketing, located at Arizona State University, The Office of Research and Development, at Northern Michigan University, the Walker L. Cisler College of Business at NMU, the American Marketing Association (Chicago, Illinois), Marquette General Hospital, Bell Hospital, and the United States Army Recruiting Command (USAREC), Fort Knox, Kentucky. He also served as the campaign manager for the McCallum for Lieutenant Governor campaign in the state of Wisconsin, and has completed numerous small-to-medium sized business consulting projects. His professional development experiences are also varied and include attending the American Marketing Association Doctoral Consortium (Harvard Business School, Harvard University) and the Faculty Development in International Business Seminar (University of South Carolina). Dr. Brunswick holds membership in the following national honor societies: Phi Kappa Phi, Beta Gamma Sigma, Alpha Mu Alpha and the National Golden Key Honor Society. He has received teaching awards from the Walker L. Cisler College of Business, the Telion Chapter of Mortar Board at Northern Michigan University, and has been named as a recipient of the Distinguished Faculty Award at NMU, Outstanding Young Alumni Award also from NMU, and he received the George Hay Brown Marketing Scholar of the Year Award from the American Marketing Association. Having joined the NMU faculty during Fall 1991 semester, he currently holds the rank of (tenured) full professor of Marketing. 50
  • 51. 51 __________________________ Course Schedule / Dateline __________________________ 27 August Course Orientation and Syllabus Introduction to Strategic Marketing 3 September Overview of Strategic Marketing Aaker chapters 1-7 Marketing Strategy Briefings 10 September Overview of Strategy Marketing – Continued Aaker chapters 8-16 Marketing Strategy Briefings 17 September Functional Area Strategies – Distribution / International Case Assignment: Duncan Industries Marketing Strategy Briefings 24 September Functional Area Strategies – Promotion Case: Drypers Corporation Marketing Strategy Briefings 1 October Functional Area Strategies – Pricing Case: Southwest Airlines Marketing Strategy Briefings 8 October Functional Area Strategies - Product Case: Cymbalta Marketing Strategy Briefings 15 October Product Liability and Marketing Strategy Short Assignment: Yamaha Rhino UTV Marketing Strategy Briefings 51
  • 52. 52 Mid-Semester Participation Feedback (Cutoff Date) __________________________ Course Schedule / Dateline __________________________ 22 October Services Marketing Strategy / CRM Short Assignment: Nextel Drops Customers Marketing Strategy Briefings 29 October Marketing Ethics and Marketing Strategy Short Assignment: Mattel Marketing Strategy Briefings 5 November Marketing Metrics Short Assignment: Marketing Dashboard Marketing Strategy Briefings 12 November E-Commerce and Marketing Strategy Short Assignment: Hybrid E-commerce Models Marketing Strategy Briefings 19 November Course Project Presentations (Grouping 1) Written Course Project Reports Due From All Students 3 December Course Project Case Presentations (Grouping 2) 10 December Course Project Case Presentations (Grouping 3) (Note: This session is during Finals Week – Thursday 6:00 – 7:50 p.m.) Note: Some casework and short assignments will be assigned to individuals, while other case work and short assignments may be assigned to teams or groups. All assignments will be made well in advance of the relevant due date for that assignment. Summary of Key Dates Midsemester (Participation) Evaluations 15 October (reflects participation up to / through 15 October session; written evaluations will be made available during the next seminar session, which is 22 October) 52
  • 53. 53 Final (Participation) Evaluations 10 December (reflects participation from 22 October session through the end of the seminar) Course Project 19 November Written report due from all students 19 November Course project final presentations (Grouping 1) 3 December Course project final presentations (Grouping 2) 10 December Course project final presentations (Grouping 3) DISABILITY SERVICES If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the Disability Services Office by: coming into the office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock or calling 227-1700. Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. NMU NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap / disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. 53
  • 54. 54 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 550 Business Statistics a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 550 Business Statistics 4 credit hours Prerequisite: MA 171 Designed to help managers understand, create an apply statistics and research methods to solve business problems. This course surveys research methods and the underlying concept of validity with the understanding that statistics based on invalid data are not useful in decision making. The course examines an array of statistical methods including measures of association, measures of difference, multivariate analysis, and non- parametric statistics with an appreciation for probability as a basis for understanding the message of these statistics, an eye toward knowing when each particular test is appropriate, and an understanding of the components of the calculations and how their values affect statistical results. (ii) MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105 is a prerequisite to MA 171 (iii) Not applicable (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? A course in statistics is typical in an MBA program. Practicing managers need to understand, create, and apply statistics to make effective business decisions. It is a valuable and powerful tool which every manager should have. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. 54
  • 55. 55 A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of … quantitative business analysis …” The mission of the Master in Business Administration program includes the preparation of students to function as effective decision makers. Practicing managers need to understand, create, and apply statistics to make effective business decisions. (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no graduate courses as prerequisites. This course, however, is a prerequisite to the capstone course in the program, BUS 590. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Students will be able to: 1. Explain why no set of data is perfect, and what can be done to improve the validity of data 2. Describe an appropriate research design or collection method given a business problem 3. Explain the logic of hypothesis testing (what it means to accept/reject a null hypothesis) 4. Describe how various distributions affect how probabilities are determined 5. Describe commonalities true to all statistical tests 6. Determine the appropriate statistical test to analyze the data to address specific problems 7. Explain the results of a statistical test in terms of probabilities g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has several academically qualified faculty to teach this course. This includes Dr. James Drosen, Associate Professor, Dr. Kenneth Janson, Professor, Dr. Bruce Sherony, Professor, and Dr. Gary Stark, Assistant Professor. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line 55
  • 56. 56 materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. See attached course syllabus for required readings. j. How will you meet these costs? There are no additional expenses to support this course. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Winter or Fall 2010 56
  • 57. 57 BUS 550 Business Statistics Course Syllabus Instructor: See item “g” above Meeting Time: Office Hours: • Required • Statistics for Management and Economics, 8/e by Gerald Keller , ISBN-10: Materials: 0324569491 © 2009 published by Cengage • Understanding Research Methods (Seventh Edition) by Mildred L. Patten; ISBN 1-884585-83-3; © 2009; published by Pyrczak MA 171 COURSE DESCRIPTION: Designed to help managers understand, create an apply statistics to solve business problems. COURSE OBJECTIVES: Most organizations need data to make decisions in a variety of functions -- production, labor, marketing, finance, etc. This class teaches you how to apply the scientific method to gathering data and analyzing it. You’ll learn what statistical tests to run on what type of data and understand what concepts apply to all data analysis, including the idea of inherent uncertainty and acceptance of Type I error. Although statistics and the scientific method are used in many disciplines (e.g., psychology, physics, etc.), examples, applications, and assignments will focus on the use of statistics in business decisions. Briefly, at the end of the semester you should be able to: •Explain why no set of data is perfect, and what can be done to improve the validity of data • Explain the logic of hypothesis testing (what it means to accept/reject a null hypothesis) • Describe how various distributions affect how you determine probabilities • Describe commonalities true to all statistical tests • Given a set of data, determine and execute the appropriate statistical test to analyze the data • Explain the results of a statistical test in terms of probabilities TOPIC OUTLINE: • Scientific Method • Validity & Measurement • Sampling • Basic Statistics, Descriptive Measures • Probability & Distributions 57
  • 58. 58 • Logic of Hypothesis Testing • t-tests, ANOVA, and Related Tests • Chi-square and Related Tests • Simple Regression • Multiple Regression • Factor Analysis • Time-Series Analysis GRADING: Unit Exams 4 @ varying point values 400 200 Exercises, Quizzes, etc. 100 Research Paper TOTAL 700 You may earn up to 30 points extra credit through various exercises and analyses Grading Scale: A 92 A- 90 B+ 87 B 82 B- 80 C+ 77 C 72 C- 70 D+ 67 D 62 D- 60 F0 Examinations: Plan for the exams to be some multiple choice (~80%), some short answer and problems, and possibly matching. Exercises, Quizzes, etc. Exercise. Plan a variety of exercises such as case analyses, problems, group discussions, etc. We will practice many of the statistical tests in class, often in groups. Paper Section Drafts. I may have you write drafts of sections of your research paper and I may grade you on these drafts. Paper Peer Reviews. I may have you review sections of your classmates’ research papers or the entire paper. If so I will grade you on the constructiveness, completeness, and accuracy of the review. Pre-Chapter Quizzes. For some chapters you may be quizzed over the book/notes before we start covering the material in more detail. Some may be done in groups. Quizzes. I may do a few post-chapter quizzes too, perhaps to give you a sense of what the exams will be like. Some may be done in groups. Research Paper You will apply the material learned in this class by briefly designing a research project (including measurements, samples, etc). You will not do actual data collection. The focus of the paper will be where you create (make up) data and analyze/ and interpret it. The paper will probably be around 10 pages double-spaced, including appendixes and references. 58
  • 59. 59 ATTENDANCE, MAKE-UPS: It is the instructor’s professional obligation to make every class session worthwhile. Class meetings may contain experiences and context that cannot be duplicated elsewhere. In that sense, missed classes cannot be made up because it is very difficult to reconstruct all the experiences of being in class. I understand missing class happens. If you miss class it was probably for something important to you. If you miss class, I consider it your responsibility to get handouts, notes, and a general run-down form somebody other than me. A limited number of points (30) missed from in-class exercises can be made up through extra credit. MAKE-UP POLICY: Make up exams will be administered during exam times for one of my other classes. Please always let me know in advance of any foreseen problems. COMMUNICATIONS: I plan to use MyNMU (My Courses) http://my.nmu.edu/ and/or your NMU e-mail address to supplement in-class communication or to deliver most handouts. I will inform you via email (nmu.edu address) of handouts and will expect you to go to MyNMU to retrieve handouts and bring them to class. DISABILITY SERVICES: If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the Disability Services Office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock (227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. NON-DISCRIMINATION: Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building. 59
  • 60. 60 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 560 Quantitative Decision Making a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 560 Quantitative Decision Making 4 credit hours Prerequisites: MA 171, CIS 212, MGT 325, ACT 230 and 240, FIN 351 This course explores the use of various Operations Research/Management Science techniques to model and solve various business problems. Spreadsheet software (specifically Microsoft Excel) will be used extensively in the modeling and solution of these problems. Some topics covered are linear programming, integer programming, decision analysis, queuing models, and simulation. (ii) MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105 is a prerequisite to MA 171; CIS 112 is a prerequisite to CIS 212 (iii) Not applicable (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? Operations Research/Management Science gives a business person a set of important quantitative tools to model and solve a variety of problems in all areas of business. This material is commonly covered in virtually all MBA programs. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of … quantitative business 60
  • 61. 61 analysis …” The MBA program focuses on preparing managers to be effective decision makers; this course contributes to that. (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no graduate courses as prerequisites. However, the course is a prerequisite to the capstone course in the program, BUS 590. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Students will be able to: 1. Recognize, model, and solve a variety of linear programming problems, and apply sensitivity analysis to the results. 2. Recognize, model and solve problems requiring integer programming techniques such as binary variables. 3. Model and analyze decision problems involving randomness. Decision tables, decision trees, the value of information, Bayes’ rule, and utility theory should be familiar to the student. 4. Model and analyze a variety of queuing (waiting line) models. Single vs. multiple servers, finite vs. infinite capacity, and finite vs. infinite source models should be familiar to the student. 5. Model, simulate, and analyze a variety of business problems that cannot be analyzed using standard analytic methods. g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has an academically qualified faculty member in Dr. James W. Drosen, Associate Professor, to staff this course. He holds a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Northwestern University. h. Equipment and Supplies None 61
  • 62. 62 i. Library and Required Readings a. In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Dr. Drosen has indicated that existing NMU library resources will be appropriate for this course; students will have access to supplementary texts and related journals in both hard copy and electronic formats. j. How will you meet these costs? There are no additional expenses to support this course. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Fall 2010 or Winter 2011 62
  • 63. 63 BUS 560 - QUANTITATIVE DECISION MAKING SYLLABUS PROFESSOR James W. Drosen Associate Professor of Business Administration College of Business 304H Cohodas Hall 1401 Presque Isle Avenue Northern Michigan University 227-1247 jdrosen@nmu.edu BULLETIN DESCRIPTION This course explores the use of various Operations Research/Management Science techniques to model and solve various business problems. Spreadsheet software (specifically Microsoft Excel) will be used extensively in the modeling and solution of these problems. Some topics covered are linear programming, integer programming, decision analysis, queuing models, and simulation. COURSE OBJECTIVES Students who complete this course should be able to achieve the following objectives: 1. Recognize, model, and solve a variety of linear programming problems, and apply sensitivity analysis to the results. 2. Recognize, model and solve problems requiring integer programming techniques such as binary variables. 3. Model and analyze decision problems involving randomness. Decision tables, decision trees, the value of information, Bayes’ rule, and utility theory should be familiar to the student. 4. Model and analyze a variety of queuing (waiting line) models. Single vs. multiple servers, finite vs. infinite capacity, and finite vs. infinite source models should be familiar to the student. 63
  • 64. 64 5. Model, simulate, and analyze a variety of business problems that cannot be analyzed using standard analytic methods. 64
  • 65. 65 PREREQUISITES Prerequisites: MA 171, CIS 212, MGT 325, ACT 230 and 240, FIN 351 CLASS STRUCTURE Students are expected to read the next topics to be covered in the text before coming to class. The class will typically begin with a lecture on the new material and many times continue with a group exercise consisting of one or several problems. Since Excel will be used extensively in the solution of these problems, it is expected that the student will bring their laptop to class and will have a basic working knowledge of Excel. Weekly homework will also be assigned. Homework may consist of textbook problems or case analyses, or problems or cases assigned by the instructor. Quizzes will be given every week or two, and will be announced in advance. ATTENDANCE POLICY It is assumed that students will attend all classes. Any work missed due to an absence will require written documentation of a university-approved reason to make up. Late homework will receive half credit if it is turned in less than one week after it is due. GRADING POLICY Each student will receive a grade based on two exams (37% each) and homework, quizzes, and group projects (26%). The minimum percentages required for a grade are as follows: 93.3 A 80.0 B- 66.6 D+ 90.0 A- 76.6 C+ 63.3 D 86.6 B+ 73.3 C 60.0 D- 83.3 B 70.0 C- 0.0 F 65
  • 66. 66 NMU DISABILITY POLICY If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services Office at C.B. 2001 Hedgcock (227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state and University guidelines. NMU NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT NMU does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap / disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. TEXTBOOK Frederick S. Hillier and Mark S. Hillier, Introduction to Management Science: a Modeling and Case Studies Approach with Spreadsheets, third edition, McGraw-Hill, 2008. (Some other possible texts include Management Science: The Art of Modeling with Spreadsheets by Stephen G. Powell and Kenneth R. Baker, Spreadsheet Modeling and Decision Analysis: A Practical Introduction to Management Science, by Cliff T. Ragsdale, and Operations Research Applications and Algorithms by Wayne L. Winston.) TOPICS FOR ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION WEEK 1 Introduction and Linear Programming: Basic Concepts WEEK 2 Linear Programming: Formulation and Applications WEEK 3 Modeling with Spreadsheets WEEK 4 Sensitivity Analysis for Linear Programming 66
  • 67. 67 WEEK 5 Network Optimization Problems WEEK 6 Integer Linear Programming and Mixed Integer Linear Programming WEEK 7 Mid-Semester Review, Overview and Discussion MID SEMESTER EXAMINATION WEEK 8 Nonlinear Programming WEEK 9 Decision Analysis WEEK 10 Forecasting WEEK 11 Introduction to Queueing Models WEEK 12 Additional Queueing Models WEEK 13 Computer Simulation: Basic Concepts WEEK 14 Simulation of Business Processes and Analysis WEEK 15 Final Examination 67
  • 68. 68 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 570 Managerial Accounting a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 570 Managerial Accounting 4 credit hours Prerequisites: ACT 240 and MA 171 Develop understanding of concepts of accounting information for planning and control of enterprise activities including concepts of cost measurement and analysis, cost behavior, profit planning, standard costing, operational and capital budgeting, decentralization, and decision support. Focus on decision makers’ analysis of accounting information and formulation of effective action plans based upon that analysis. (ii) ACT 230 is a prerequisite for ACT 240; MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105 is a prerequisite to MA 171 (iii) Not applicable (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? To function effectively, managers need timely information about the financial consequences of decision alternatives. They plan operations with careful concern for these consequences and, once a plan is implemented, they monitor its attainment level. Measures of attainment quantify the outcome of the plan and motivate, when necessary, corrective actions. Managerial accounting addresses the needs of decision makers for relevant information to plan operations, to monitor outcomes, and to implement control strategies. Managerial accounting competency is a core component of the educational program for managers. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. 68
  • 69. 69 A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of accounting…” (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no graduate courses as prerequisites. This course is a prerequisite to the capstone course in the program, BUS 590. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Students will be able to: 1. Consider the cost and performance information necessary for long-term success in various competitive environments. 2 Develop a framework for utilizing information generated by managerial information systems for tactical and strategic decisions. 3. Consider the current and emerging practices in cost management. 4. Evaluate the methods for decentralizing and controlling organizations g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has an academically qualified faculty member in Dr. Kenneth Janson (PhD and CPA), Professor of Accounting, to staff this course. Dr. Kenneth Janson has several years of graduate teaching and professional business experience in the area of managerial accounting and related fields. He has his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. 69
  • 70. 70 Several comprehensive textbooks exist that are appropriate for a Managerial Accounting course offered at the MBA level; an appropriate textbook will be a student purchased resource that is required for BUS 570. Access to news feeds and business current events is crucially important, but adequately supplied through resources available through the internet. For reserve readings, access to the following journals or a “course pack strategy” is required: i. ABACUS ii. Accountancy iii. Accounting Education iv. Accounting, Organizations and Society v. Commercial Lending Review vi. Forbes vii. Journal of Accounting & Public Policy viii. Journal of Cost Management ix. Journal of Health Care Finance x. Management Accounting xi. Management Accounting Quarterly The instructor will arrange for articles from these journals to be available for reserve readings. j. How will you meet these costs? Not Applicable k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Winter or Fall 2011 70
  • 71. 71 BUS 570 Managerial Accounting Kenneth R. Janson, Ph.D., CPA Phone: 906-227-2682 310AA Cohodas Building E-mail: kjanson@nmu.edu Class meeting: 6:00 to 9:20 p.m. Monday evenings Office Hours: 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons Other times by appointment Course Description: Develop understanding of concepts of accounting information for planning and control of enterprise activities including concepts of cost measurement and analysis, cost behavior, profit planning, standard costing, operational and capital budgeting, decentralization, and decision support. Focus on decision makers’ analysis of accounting information and formulation of effective action plans based upon that analysis. Required Text: Garrison, R.H., E.W. Noreen, & P.C. Brewer, Managerial Accounting, 12th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2009. Objectives: Any organization’s long-term competitive success is critically dependent on (1) the quality of information about its products, services, processes, organizational units, suppliers, and customers, (2) its ability to act [rationally] on that information, and (3) its ability to motivate its employees and control its performance consistent with that information. The term managerial accounting refers to the set of information concepts, models and systems that provide this information and control for managers. This course will introduce you to the modern concepts of managerial accounting. The main objectives are to: • Consider the cost and performance information necessary for long-term success in various competitive environments. • Develop a framework for utilizing information generated by managerial information systems for tactical and strategic decisions. • Consider the current and emerging practices in cost management. • Evaluate the methods for decentralizing and controlling organizations. Prerequisites: ACT 240 – Principles of Accounting II and its prerequisite, ACT 230, which together comprise the introductory undergraduate sequence in principles of accounting at NMU, or equivalent college level study of accounting principles. 71
  • 72. 72 Learning & Evaluation: Learning occurs through a variety of activities. Our classroom time will be devoted to lectures and discussion of assigned material, in-class activities that reinforce our lecture topics, and demonstrations of managerial accounting research techniques, primarily internet based, which address issues germane to the study of public corporations. Student achievement will be assessed through several measured activities. Course grades will be assigned based upon points earned on examinations and other activities. Of 1000 possible points, 570 points may be earned on examinations and 430 points may be earned on other activities. Final grades will be determined by curve, but 850 points will always be sufficient to earn a grade of A; 700 points will always be sufficient to earn a grade of B+; and 600 points will always be sufficient to earn a grade of B-. Exams: 570 points possible. Learning is measured by two exams, a mid-term in approximately the eighth week, and the final. The mid-term exam (250 points) will cover the first eight chapters and the final exam (320 points) will cover the entire course. Exams are in-class activities that are designed to measure each student’s grasp of the subject matter and problem solving skills – exams are not designed to test speed or a student’s ability to memorize formulas. Accordingly, students may optionally prepare “Exam Notes” to be used as reference aids for each exam. Each student’s “Exam Note” is to be his or her own composition, and must be signed to that effect and submitted for instructor review at the time of the examination. Other activities: 430 points possible – Several graded activities will permit students to earn up to 430 points. Approximately 550 points will be offered, so occasional missed activities or a few poor quiz scores can be readily made up. These 550 opportunity points are distributed approximately as follows: 1. Homework: 150 points possible. Students are assigned reading from the text and are directed to questions and exercises that should be attempted before attending each lecture. In our lecture sessions, we will first present the material related to the readings, discuss key concepts and issues, and then develop solutions for the assigned exercises and problems. Certain homework problems are designated as hand-in problems, and will be evaluated for course credit. Hand-in problems should be neatly prepared. Clarity, organization, and evidence of effort are more relevant than “correctness” in the assessment of homework. 2. Quizzes and In-Class Activities: 200 points possible. Occasional quizzes will be administered throughout the semester. Quizzes typically cover assigned readings and homework problems and are generally 5 short calculations or objective type questions. “IN-CLASS” activities will reinforce our study topics and participation points will be earned through their successful completion. Often, In-class activities are group projects that require internet research or a team based effort to solve a few quiz questions. 3. Managerial Accounting Analysis Projects: 100 points possible. Two managerial accounting data analysis projects. Projects may include the collection of corporation data from Internet sources and the analysis of those data to support reasoned conclusions about the companies selected for study. Students should expect to gain research skills that will facilitate the competent investigation of corporate affairs, and be germane to their future professional activities – 50 points available for each project. 4. Supplemental Readings: 100 points possible. For each topical area that we study, one or a few articles from the current academic and professional literature of managerial 72
  • 73. 73 accounting are assigned readings. Readings should be completed before the class session when that topic is discussed. Prepare a two page critical summary for each of two articles. Your choice of articles – 50 points available for each summary. Non-Discrimination Policy: Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, girth, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. Americans with Disabilities Act Accommodations: If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the Disability Services Office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock (227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. Plagiarism: Academic dishonesty such as plagiarism is considered a serious offense and will result in a failing grade for the course and possible disciplinary action in accordance with university policy. You may refer to section 2.2.3 of Northern Michigan University's student code for complete details of the policies regarding academic dishonesty. Topical Outline: TOPIC Items for In- Items to be Class Discussion submitted Read 1. Managerial Accounting and the Business R1 1-4,5 1-1,2 Environment 2. Cost Terms, Concepts and Classifications R2 2-1,2,3,4,8,13 2-16,17 3. Systems Design: Job-Order Costing R3 3-2,3,4,5,8,9 3-14 4. Systems Design: Process Costing R4 4-1,2,4,6,7,10 4-21 5. Cost Behavior: Analysis & Use R5 5-2,3,6,12 5-18 6. Cost-Volume-Profit Relationships R6 6-1,2,3,4,6,7,8 6-19 7. Variable Costing: A Tool for Management R7 7-1,2,3,8,14 7-16 8. Activity Based Costing: A Tool to Aid Decision R8 8-2,3,4,5,11 8-24 Making 9. Profit Planning R9 9-1,2,3,4,5,6,7 9-19 73
  • 74. 74 10. Standard Costs and the Balanced Scorecard R10 10-1,2,3,4,5,6 10-16 11. Flexible Budgets and Overhead Analysis R11 11-1,2,4,5,6 11-13 12. Segment Reporting and Decentralization R12 12-1,2,3,4,7,6 12-9,11 13. Relevant Costs for Decision Making R13 13-1,2,3,4,5,6 13-16 14. Capital Budgeting Decisions R14 14-1,2,3,4,5,6,7, 14-12,13 8 15. Service Department Costing; An Activity R15 15-1,2,3,4 15-10 Approach Readings: R1: Chan, Siu Y., “Quality Management Systems Certification: Research Note”, ABACUS 37, no.2, 2001, pp.248-266. R2: Gordon, L.A. and M. P. Loeb, “Distinguishing between Direct and Indirect Costs Is Crucial for Internet Companies”, Management Accounting Quarterly, Summer 2001, pp. 12-17. R3: Evans, J.H., Y. Hwang, and N.J. Nagarajan, “Management Control and Hospital Cost Reduction: Additional Evidence,” Journal of Accounting and Public Policy 20, 2001, pp. 73-88. R4: P. Longmore, “Process Costing Demystified,” Accountancy, October 1994, pp.88-91. R5: A. Novin, “Applying Overhead: How to Fin d the Right bases and Rates,” Management Accounting, March 1992, pp. 40-43. R6: L. Kroll, “Fear of Flying,” Forbes, March 24, 1997, pp. 108-111. R7: W.S. Waller, B. Shapiro, & G. Sevcik, “Do Cost-Based Pricing Biases Persist in Laboratory Markets?” Accounting, Organizations and Society, November 1999, pp. 717-740. R8: R.S. Kaplan & V.G. Narayanan, “Measuring and Managing Customer Profitability,” Journal of Cost Management, September/October 2001, pp.5-15. R9: Janson, K.R., “Estimating Loan-Loss Exposure: A Comparison of Traditional and Markov Models”, Commercial Lending Review, vol. 19, no.6, Nov-Dec 2004, pp.25-32. R10: R.K. Fleischman & T. N. Tyson, “The Evolution of Standard Costing in the U.K. and U.S.: From Decision Making to Control,” ABACUS 34, no. 1, 1998, pp.92-119. R11: K.T. Wing, “Using Enhanced Cost Models in Variance Analysis for Better Control and Decision Making,” Management Accounting Quarterly, Winter 2000, pp.27-35. R12: R. Luther & N. Robson, “Overhead Allocation: A cautionary Tale!” Accounting Education, November 2001, pp. 413-419. 74
  • 75. 75 R13: J. Balakrishnan, “Spreadsheet Optimization: A Support Tool for the Theory of Constraints,” Journal of Cost Management, January/February 2003, pp. 39-45. R14: K.L. Reiter & D.G. Smith, “Capital Investment Strategies in Health Care Systems,” Journal of Health Care Finance, Summer 2000, pp.31-42. R15: J.B. Stinson, “Cost Allocation – From the Simple to the Sublime,” Management Accounting Quarterly, Fall 2002, pp .1-10. 75
  • 76. 76 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 580 Financial Analysis and Management a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 580 Financial Analysis and Management 4 credit hours Prerequisites: FIN 351 This course is designed to cover corporate topics of interest to MBAs. It includes treatment of some theoretical issues in finance as well as practical application of those topics. Topics include: Ethics, Global Issues in Finance, Time Value of Money, Cost of Capital, Financial Forecasting, Firm Valuation, Capital Budgeting, Risk Analysis, Capital Structure, and Dividend and Firm Reinvestment Issues. (ii) ACT 240 is a prerequisite for FIN 351, and ACT 230 is a prerequisite for ACT 240 (iii) Financial Mgmt (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? As stated at the beginning of this MBA program proposal “The primary objective of this program is to educate future, middle and senior managers to deal with the essential problems of choice, complexity and change in the challenging environment of business. The program is designed to develop critical thinking and analytical skills which the manager can use to take effective decisions and solve organizational problems in a profit- oriented, free enterprise economy.” FIN 580’s role in this program is to develop the critical financial thinking and analytical skills needed by managers. The critical financial topics covered are: Ethics, Global Issues in Finance, Time Value of Money, Cost of Capital, Financial Forecasting, Firm Valuation, Capital Budgeting, Risk Analysis, Capital Structure, and Dividend and Firm Reinvestment Issues. Several projects including a company valuation will integrate these topics. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program and is a prerequisite to the capstone BUS 590 course. This is a graduate level course and does not require any 500 level prerequisite courses. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. 76
  • 77. 77 (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. A key competency expected of graduates of this program is to “understand and apply theoretical knowledge in integrated fundamental areas of … finance…” (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length course at the graduate level. It is a stand-alone course with no graduate courses as prerequisites. This course, however, is a prerequisite to the capstone course in the program, BUS 590. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives The student will develop both a conceptual and an analytical understanding of the role of the finance function and the financial manager in today's corporate business environment. Not only will the student gain an understanding of the various functions and decisions of the financial manager, but an ability to apply financial techniques to solve financial problems should be developed. In addition, the student will gain an appreciation for the importance and interrelationships between the finance function and other functional areas of business. g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has academically qualified faculty members in Dr. Charles Rayhorn (PhD, University of Colorado), Professor of Finance, and Dr. David Rayome (PhD, Kent State University), Professor of Finance, to teach this course. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings 77
  • 78. 78 In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Drs Rayhorn and Rayome have indicated that the present library holdings are sufficient. More importantly, the library’s collection of online databases and internet access to major text and periodical publisher web sites are very sufficient. These publisher web sites include: Blackwell-Synergy, Cambridge Journals online, Directory of open access journals, Highwire Press, JSTOR, Oxford Journals, Project Muse, SAGE, ScienceDirect Journals, SpringerLink Contemporary, and Wiley InterScience Journals, among others. However, Olson Library does not subscribe to every business-related online journal available through these publishers, nor do its holdings begin with volume 1. j. How will you meet these costs? Not applicable. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date Winter or Fall 2010 78
  • 79. 79 BUS 580 Financial Analysis and Management Charles R Rayhorn, Ph.D., CFP Phone: 906-227-1839 314F Cohodas Building E-mail: crayhorn@nmu.edu Class meeting: 6:00 to 9:20 p.m. On the assigned day. Office Hours: 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons. Other times by appointment Required books: 1. Corporate Finance: An Introduction, Ivo Welch, Prentice Hall 2009. 2. Excel Modeling and Estimation in Corporate Finance- 3/E, Craig W. Holden, Pearson Prentice Hall 2009. 3. The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Random House 2007. 4. Against the Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk, Peter L. Bernstein, Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1998. 5. Psychology of Investing (3rd Edition) John R. Nofsinger (this is a book about behavioral finance— while it is focused towards investing, the concepts apply to mistakes managers make in any type of financial analysis). Description: This course is designed to cover corporate topics of interest to MBAs. It includes treatment of some theoretical issues in finance as well as practical application of those topics. Expect outside readings and casework in addition to the text and assigned problems. Topics include: Ethics, Global Issues in Finance, Time Value of Money, Cost of Capital, Financial Forecasting, Firm Valuation, Capital Budgeting, Risk Analysis, Capital Structure, and Dividend and Firm Reinvestment Issues. Objectives: BUS 580 begins with the examination of the basic financial management problems and decisions faced by firms; extends the theory of the firm; and further develops the tools necessary when dealing with these problems. Financial management takes the long run profitability objective from economic theory and applies it to the investment and financing decisions of the firm. In this course the role of finance, financial statement analysis, time value of money, statistical concepts such as risk and return, stock and bond valuation, and capital budgeting are all examined. And, of course, ethics will be discussed throughout. The student should develop both a conceptual and an analytical understanding of the role of the finance function and the financial manager in today's corporate business environment. Not only should the student gain an understanding of the various functions and decisions of the financial 79
  • 80. 80 manager, but an ability to apply financial techniques to solve financial problems should be developed. In addition, the student should gain an appreciation for the importance and interrelationships between the finance function and other functional areas of business. Prerequisites: Phase I courses Learning & Evaluation: Learning occurs through a variety of activities. Our classroom time will be devoted to lectures and discussion of assigned material, in-class activities that reinforce our lecture topics, and demonstrations of managerial accounting research techniques, primarily internet based, which address issues germane to the study of public corporations. Student achievement will be assessed through several measured activities. Course grades will be assigned based upon points earned on examinations and other activities. Of 1000 possible points, 250 points may be earned on examinations and 750 points may be earned on other activities. Final grades will be determined by curve, but 850 points will always be sufficient to earn a grade of A; 700 points will always be sufficient to earn a grade of B+; and 600 points will always be sufficient to earn a grade of B-. Exams: 250 points possible. Learning is measured by an exam at the end of each of the ‘Parts’ in the Ivo text. Exams are in-class activities that are designed to measure each student’s grasp of the subject matter and problem solving skills – exams are not designed to test speed or a student’s ability to memorize formulas. Accordingly, students may optionally prepare “Exam Notes” to be used as reference aids for each exam. Each student’s “Exam Note” is to be his or her own composition, and must be signed to that effect and submitted for instructor review at the time of the examination. Other activities: 750 points possible – Several graded activities will permit students to earn up to 430 points. Approximately 550 points will be offered, so occasional missed activities or a few poor quiz scores can be readily made up. These 550 opportunity points are distributed approximately as follows: Homework: 250 points possible. Students will be assigned homework from the Ivo book (book 1—see list of books (above)) using MyFinance. MyFinance will be explained the first class period. The problems are open ended problems and not multiple choice questions. Cases/Projects: 250 points possible. Two shorter cases each worth 50 points and a longer company valuation project worth 150 points. Supplemental Readings: 250 points possible. 30 minutes of each class will be devoted to discussion of the assigned chapters in books 3, 4, and 5 (see list of see list of books (above)). Non-Discrimination Policy: Northern Michigan University does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, girth, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. Americans with Disabilities Act Accommodations: If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the 80
  • 81. 81 Disability Services Office at 2001 C. B. Hedgcock (227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state, and University guidelines. Plagiarism: Academic dishonesty such as plagiarism is considered a serious offense and will result in a failing grade for the course and possible disciplinary action in accordance with university policy. You may refer to section 2.2.3 of Northern Michigan University's student code for complete details of the policies regarding academic dishonesty. Weekly TOPICs Chapters MyFinance Additional Cases/projects Book Lab Readings— 2— book 1 Homework— books 3, 4 Based on Part 6 Web based. and 5 topics in book should Book 1 1 be done before class starts 1. Value and Capital 1-3 Assignment Against the Cap Budget-1 Part 1 Budgeting 1 Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk 2. Value and Capital 4&5 Assignment Against the Cap Budget-1 Part 1 Budgeting 2 Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk 3. Value and Capital 5&6 Assignment Against the Cap Budget-1 Part 1 Budgeting 3 Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk 4. Risk and Return (+ 6&7 Assignment Against the Company Part 2 Books 3 & 4—prelim 4 Gods: The valuation discussion) Remarkable project Story of Risk 5. Risk and Return (+ 7&9 Assignment Against the Company Part 2 Books 3 & 4—prelim 5 Gods: The valuation discussion) Remarkable project Story of Risk 6. Value and Market 10 Assignment The Black Company Part 2 Efficiency in an Imperfect Swan: The valuation 81
  • 82. 82 Market 6 Impact of the project Highly Improbable 7. Value and Market 11 Assignment The Black Company Part 3 Efficiency in an Imperfect 7 Swan: The valuation Market Impact of the project Highly Improbable 8. Real-World 12&13 Assignment The Black Company Part 3 Applications 8 Swan: The valuation Impact of the project Highly Improbable 9. Real-World 14 Assignment The Black Company Part 3 Applications 9 Swan: The valuation Impact of the project Highly Improbable 10. Capital Structure and 15&16 Assignment The Black Company Part 4 Payout Policy 10 Swan: The valuation Impact of the project Highly Improbable 11. Capital Structure and 17&18 Assignment The Black Company Part 4 Payout Policy 11 Swan: The valuation Impact of the project Highly Improbable 12. Capital Structure and 19&20 Assignment Corporate Company Part 4 Payout Policy and 12 Governance valuation Projecting the Future project by John R. Nofsinger 13. Additional Topics 25 Assignment Corporate Options and Part 5 13 Governance Risk Management- by John R. 1 Nofsinger 14. Additional Topics 26 Assignment Corporate Options and Part 5 14 Governance Risk Management- 82
  • 83. 83 by John R. 1 Nofsinger 15. Additional Topics 26 Assignment Corporate Part 5 15 Governance by John R. Nofsinger Table of Contents-- Corporate Finance: An Introduction, Ivo Welch, Prentice Hall 2009. Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 The Time Value of Money and Net Present Value Chapter 3 Stock and Bond Valuation: Annuities and Perpetuities Chapter 4 A First Encounter With Capital Budgeting Rules Chapter 5 Time-Varying Rates of Return and the Yield Curve Chapter 6 Uncertainty, Default, and Risk Chapter 7 A First Look at Investments Chapter 8 Investor Choice: Risk and Reward Chapter 9 The Capital Asset Pricing Model Chapter 10 Market Imperfections Chapter 11 Efficient Markets, Classical Finance, and Behavioral Finance Chapter 12 Capital Budgeting Applications and Pitfalls Chapter 13 From Financial Statements To Economic Cash Flows Chapter 14 Valuation From Comparables and Some Financial Ratios Chapter 15 Corporate Claims Chapter 16 Capital Structure and Capital Budgeting in a Perfect Market Chapter 17 The Weighted Cost of Capital and Adjusted Present Value in an Imperfect Market With Taxes Chapter 18 More Market Imperfections Influencing Capital Structure Chapter 19 Equity Payouts: Dividends and Share Repurchases Chapter 20 Pro Forma Financial Statements Chapter 21 Capital Structure Dynamics Chapter 22 Capital Structure Patterns in the United States Chapter 23 Investment Banking and M&A Chapter 24 Corporate Governance Chapter 25 International Finance Chapter 26 Options (and More) Table of Contents-- Excel Modeling and Estimation in Corporate Finance- 3/E. Part 1: Chapter 1 — Single Cash Flow Chapter 2 — Annuity Chapter 3 — NPV Using Constant Discounting Chapter 4 — NPV Using General Discounting 83
  • 84. 84 Chapter 5 — Loan Amortization Part 2: Chapter 6 — Bond Valuation Chapter 7 — Estimating Cost of Capital Chapter 8 — Stock Valuation Chapter 9 — Firm and Project Valuation Chapter 10 — The Yield Curve Chapter 11 — US Yield Curve Dynamics Part 3: Chapter 12 — Project NPV Chapter 13 — Cost-Reducing Project Chapter 14 — Break-Even Analysis Part 4: Chapter 15 — Corporate Financial Planning Chapter 16 — Du Pont System of Ratio Analysis Chapter 17 — Life-Cycle Financial Planning Part 5: Chapter 18 — Binomial Option Pricing Chapter 19 — Real Options Chapter 20 — Black Scholes Option Pricing Chapter 21 — Debt and Equity Valuation Chapter 22 — International Parity Part 6: Chapter 23 — Useful Excel Tricks 84
  • 85. 85 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 590 Strategic Management a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 590 Strategic Management 4 credit hours Prerequisites: BUS 500, BUS 530, BUS 540, BUS 550, BUS 560, BUS 570, BUS 580 Strategic Management is a study of the process of developing an integrative plan for a company to progress toward the achievement of its goals and objectives. The interactive roles of the board of directors and senior managers are emphasized. Techniques are used to integrate middle level managers and supervisors into the planning process. Strategic management requires the implementation of a macro-environmental analysis and the use of accounting, finance, marketing, management, and quantitative and statistical tools. This is the capstone course in the MBA program and requires a research project and report. (ii) BUS 500 has an undergraduate prerequisite of MGT 344 BUS 530 has an undergraduate prerequisite of MGT 240 BUS 540 has an undergraduate prerequisite of MKT 230 BUS 550 has an undergraduate prerequisite of MA 171; MA 171 requires MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105 BUS 560 has undergraduate prerequisites of MA 171, CIS 212, MGT 325, ACT 230 and 240, and FIN 351; MA 171 requires MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105. CIS 212 requires CIS 112. BUS 570 has undergraduate prerequisites of MA 171 and ACT 240; MA 171 requires MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105; ACT 230 is a prerequisite for ACT 240 BUS 580 has undergraduate prerequisite of ACT 240; ACT 240 has a prerequisite of ACT 230 (iii) Not Applicable (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? Strategic Management is a basic and critical component of any successful business and/or non-profit organization, and as a result virtually all AACSB-accredited MBA programs contain some course on Strategic Management. Strategic Management is a process of developing and implementing strategies by the top officers of a company and its board of directors. Business graduate students who aspire and expect to move into upper management positions in Upper Peninsula business institutions need this training in order to 85
  • 86. 86 successfully guide their intuitions into the future. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is a required course in the program. This is a graduate level course and is the last course in the program. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. This capstone course provides students a culminating, integrated framework for managerial decision making – the prime focus of the MBA program. (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number This is a semester length capstone course to be taken by students towards the end of the MBA program. The course has several graduate courses as prerequisites. The high number (590) reflects its position in the sequence of courses that students will take to complete the program. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 4 credits course. e. Course Outline Please see attached. f. Course Objectives Students will be able to: 1. Diagnose the business environment to determine the current state of economic conditions. 2. Size up the industry and the company by identifying the core strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. 3. Design new goals and objectives for a company to achieve. 86
  • 87. 87 4. Analyze facts to identify strategies to achieve the new goals and objectives. 5. Develop and apply analytical tools and techniques for evaluating the strategic alternatives. 6. Choose strategies that are appropriate to each situation. 7. Recommend tactical courses of action to begin to pursue the chosen strategies. 8. Develop controls to evaluate the effectiveness of the strategic plan and to make corrections. g. Staffing There is no additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has an academically qualified faculty member in Dr. Bruce Sherony to staff this course. He holds a Ph.D. in Business Administration from Saint Louis University. His dissertation and subsequent research has analyzed corporate directorship practices. Dr. Sherony is a tenured full professor at Northern Michigan University. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings Existing NMU library resources will be appropriate for this course. Students will have access to contemporary business publications, especially The Academy of Management Review, Business Week, Barron’s, Journal of Accountancy, Financial Executive, Harvard Business Review, The Journal of Marketing, MIT Sloan Management Review, and The Wall Street Journal. Most of the above journals are available on the open shelves and some are available through the ABI/INFORM database. In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. Dr. Sherony has indicated that the holdings of the library are sufficient to meet the needs of this course. j. How will you meet these costs? Not applicable. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None 87
  • 88. 88 m. Implementation Date Winter or Fall 2012 88
  • 89. 89 BUS 590 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT SYLLABUS PROFESSOR Bruce C. Sherony Professor of Business Administration College of Business 310-C Cohodas Hall 1401 Presque Isle Avenue Northern Michigan University 227-1236 bsherony@nmu.edu BULLETIN DESCRIPTION Strategic Management is a study of the process of developing an integrative plan for a company to progress toward the achievement of its goals and objectives. The interactive role of the board of directors and senior managers is emphasized. Techniques are used to integrate middle level managers and supervisors into the planning process. Strategic management requires the implementation of a macro-environmental analysis and the use of accounting, finance, marketing, management, and quantitative and statistical tools. COURSE OVERVIEW MGT 590, Strategic Management, expands the range of materials covered in an undergraduate course in business strategies or strategic management. The extended coverage includes advanced topics that address analytical questions in business development and extensive readings on strategic management. The course requires the development of a graduate strategic analysis paper. Examples of the coverage of this MBA class in strategic management are likely to include the development of pro-forma cash budgets and financial statements, modeling and calculating cost-volume-profit relationships, forecasting using regression and other methods, conducting financial statement analysis, as well as measurement and assessment of consumer behavior. Readings are assigned to develop mid-management and upper management capabilities for analyzing market entry opportunities, developing strategy capabilities, sustaining strategic focus, and learning when and how to implement market exit strategies. OBJECTIVES Students who complete this course should be able to achieve the following objectives: • Diagnose the business environment to determine the current state of economic conditions. 89
  • 90. 90 • Size up the industry and the company by identifying the core strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. • Design new goals and objectives for a company to achieve. • Analyze facts to identify strategies to achieve the new goals and objectives. • Develop and apply analytical tools and techniques for evaluating the strategic alternatives. • Choose strategies that are appropriate to each situation. • Recommend tactical courses of action to begin to pursue the chosen strategies. • Develop controls to evaluate the effectiveness of the strategic plan and to make corrections. • Write up the results of a strategic plan and communicate it to the class. PREREQUISITES Bus 500 Managerial Communication Bus 530 Organizations: Structure, Behavior and Human Performance Bus 540 Marketing Strategy Bus 550 Business Statistics Bus 560 Quantitative Decision Making Bus 570 Managerial Accounting Bus 580 Financial Analysis and Management METHODOLOGY OF APPROACH Students are responsible for reading, analyzing and taking notes on strategic management as the process is developed throughout the course. In addition, students will read and report on research articles on strategic management and respond to strategic management training incident problems. A written analysis of the article themes and assigned problems will be completed weekly and brought to class. During the class session, students will participate in a discussion of the assigned problem and report on the strategic management research article issues. At the end of the analysis, the instructor will collect the assignments and summarize the major issues and draw conclusions. E-mailed assignments are not acceptable. GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH PROJECT AND REPORT The MBA capstone course is a very important component of the graduate education experience. Graduate students are required to develop a detailed and comprehensive analysis of a company and design strategies to improve its effectiveness. Both for-profit and not-for-profit companies are acceptable. It may be possible that companies to be studied are from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Businesses outside the Upper Peninsula can be assigned from the Global On-Line MBA resource data base, with the permission of the instructor. The strategic analysis project will consist of a research investigation, an analysis of the findings and a plan to reposition the company into the future. The strategic analysis will include the following steps. Develop a Diagnosis. A macro environmental analysis is first conducted to investigate the current state of the economy and the nature of the industry of the company. Develop a Prognosis. The chosen company is examined to evaluate its history, its strengths, its weaknesses, its opportunities and its threats. Its current standing and key indicators of its performance are projected into the future to determine where it is heading. 90
  • 91. 91 Develop Objectives. The student must decide where the company should be heading. The student’s research and creativity will evolve new objectives for the company to achieve. Develop Strategies. The student must develop concrete strategies that will help to achieve the new objectives. Develop Tactics. The student must develop the operational and action plans that will be instituted to begin to evolve the strategies. Develop Controls. The student must design the checkpoints and standards that have to be met to assess the degree of achievement of the strategic plan and to take corrective action. GRADUATE STUDENT CORE COMPETENCIES Students must develop and include the accounting, finance, management, marketing, ethical and international aspects of their company’s strategies in their graduate reports. These skill competencies are largely developed in the MBA Core Courses; they are reinforced when applied to strategic situations and opportunities in BUS 590, Strategic Management, during weekly assignments and discussions. GRADUATE PRESENTATIONS Each student will present a comprehensive analysis of the above mentioned strategy process to the class as well as managers and board members of Upper Peninsula companies being investigated and analyzed. At the end of each presentation, the remainder of the class will offer the presenter additional ideas, ask questions, clarify issues, and make additional suggestions. The remaining class participants who are not presenting on a particular business will study characteristics of the company well in advance and write and submit a written brief critique of the major issues that should be covered in the presentation. Specific suggestions for the critiques will be presented by the instructor. ATTENDANCE POLICY The instructor has recognized that a relationship exists between class attendance and academic performance. Therefore, it is assumed that all students will attend class regularly. A grade of zero is given for all work required during a class session resulting from an unexcused absence. Attendance is a factor that will be considered in determining a course grade when performance is borderline between two grades. Attendance is also a consideration in written recommendations. Recommendations are not written for any unexcused absences from all classes taught by this instructor. GRADING POLICY Each student will receive a grade based on class participation, written and oral presentation of research articles, training incident problems, cases, and mid-term and final examinations. A rough breakdown of the grade distribution is the following: Written Weekly Reports 35% Class Discussion and Participation 7% Presentations of Business Strategies 8% Written Business Strategy Report 25% Mid-Term & Final Examinations 25% 91
  • 92. 92 NMU DISABILITY POLICY If you have a need for disability-related accommodations or services, please inform the Coordinator of Disability Services Office at C.B. 2001 Hedgcock (227-1700). Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to students if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state and University guidelines. NMU NON-DISCRIMAINATION STATEMENT NMU does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap / disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status in employment or the provision of services, and provides, upon request, reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate in all programs and activities. Anyone having civil rights inquiries may contact the Equal Opportunity Office, 158 Services Building, telephone number 906-227-2420. STUDY MATERIALS McGraw Hill & Irwin, Primis On-Line Global MBA Resource Database. Course materials selected from the data base are in the course manual and available at the NMU bookstore. NMU Olson Library Business Sources. Course materials selected from the library are on the open shelves and can also be obtained from the ABI/INFORM database. NMU College of Business Resources. Course materials developed in the College of Business will be provided to students in print or electronically. MBA STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENTS WEEK 1 The Nature of Strategic Management Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: Henry Mintzberg, “Manager's Job: Folklore and Fact” Research Article: Michael Porter, “What is Strategy?” Training Incident: Goal Setting at Norman Manufacturing Company Training Incident: Great Lakes Boat Company WEEK 2 Strategy Formulation and Process Graduate Student Assignments: 92
  • 93. 93 Research Article: Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad, “Strategic Intent” Research Article: Peter Senge, “The Leader’s New Work: Building Learning Organizations” Training Incident: Cost, Volume, Profit Relationships at the Blue Lake Boat Company Training Incident: Robin Hood WEEK 3 Implementing Strategies: Accounting Issues Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: Michael Porter, “Five Competitive Forces That Shape Strategy” Research Article: Henry Mintzberg, “Generic Strategies” Training Incident: Developing Pro Forma Financial Statements at Swisshelm; Training Incident: Developing Pro-Forma Financial Statements at Charles Drebes Artistic Creations WEEK 4 Implementing Strategies: Financial Issues Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: Henry Mintzberg, “Crafting Strategies” Research Article: James Quinn and John Voyer, “Logical Incrementalism: Managing Strategy Formation” Training Incident: Financial Statement Analysis at Polaroid Training Incident: To Enter the Gift Wrapping Business: A Dilemma for Lake Superior Press WEEK 5 Implementing Strategies: Marketing Issues Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: David Hurst, “The Dangers of Objectivity” Research Article: Joseph Lampel and Henry Mintzberg, “Customizing Customization” Training Incident: Binomial Distribution Problem at the Country Market Store Training Incident: Foxy’s Den: To Mass Customize WEEK 6 Implementing Strategies: Management Issues 93
  • 94. 94 Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: George Day and Paul Schoemaker, “Avoiding the Pitfalls of Emerging Technologies” Research Article: Henry Mintzberg, “Productivity Is Killing American Enterprise” Training Incident: The Case of the Missing Time Training Incident: Regression Analysis at Westwood Company WEEK 7 Implementing Strategies: Ethical Issues Graduate Student Assignments Research Article: Claes Gustafsson, “”New Values, Morality, and Strategic Ethics” Research Article: Peter F. Drucker, “What Executives Should Remember” Mid Semester Examination WEEK 8 Examination Review Implementing Strategies: International Issues Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: “Global Strategy…in a World of Nations” Research Article: “The Honda Effect” Training Case: Lincoln Electric International WEEK 9 Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: James Quinn, Philip Anderson and Sydney Finkelstein, “Managing Intellect” Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 1: Student Presentation 2: Student Presentation 3: WEEK 10 94
  • 95. 95 Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: Mark C. Maletz and Nitin Nohria, “Managing in the Whitespace” Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 4: Student Presentation 5: Student Presentation 6: WEEK 11 Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: Michael Porter, “From Competitive Advantage to Corporate Strategy” Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 7: Student Presentation 8: Student Presentation 9: WEEK 12 Graduate Student Assignments: Research Article: Gary Hamel, “Strategy Innovation and the Quest for Value” Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 10: Student Presentation 11: Student Presentation 12: WEEK 13 Submission of Graduate Student Research Project Written Reports Research Article: Ricardo Semler, “How We Went Digital Without a Strategy” Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 13: Student Presentation 14: Student Presentation 15: WEEK 14 95
  • 96. 96 Research Article: Henry Mintzberg, “Managing Quietly” Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 16: Student Presentation 17: Student Presentation 18: WEEK 15 Strategy Presentations: Student Presentation 19: Student Presentation 20: Course Evaluation Final Examination 96
  • 97. 97 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 595 Special Topics in Business Management a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 595 Special Topics in Business Management 1-4 credit hours Prerequisites: Approval of MBA Program Director Courses offering subject matter of timely and not necessarily enduring nature; special courses that take advantage of a faculty member or visiting lecturer’s current research or expertise. This class is available to provide students with unique learning opportunities (ii) Students are required to have completed at least 20 credit hours of the MBA graduate curriculum and have the approval of the MBA program director. (iii) BUS 595 Special Topics (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? This class allows for the flexibility to cover timely special topics that may not be available in other classes. Visiting academics and professionals would be able to use this class to enrich the MBA student experience. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is an elective course in the program. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number 97
  • 98. 98 This is a semester length course to be taken by students advanced into the MBA program. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits This is a semester length 1-4 credits course. e. Course Outline Special topics classes will be approved by the MBA program director in advance of their scheduled offerings. Special topics classes may vary in content as they exist to offer experimental courses that cover a timely but not enduring nature. These courses will take advantage of a faculty member or visiting lecturer’s current research or expertise. As such, the outlines for this class will vary. f. Course Objectives To offer subject matter of timely and not necessarily enduring nature; to offer special courses that take advantage of a faculty member or visiting lecturer’s current research or expertise. And to provide students with unique learning opportunities This class allows for the flexibility to cover timely special topics that may not be available in other classes. Visiting academics and professionals will use this class to enrich the MBA student experience. g. Staffing There is not necessarily additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has several academically qualified faculty members who can teach graduate level courses. Any of them could teach BUS 595. In addition, professionals may be afforded the opportunity at some time in the future to teach the class. That cost would be budgeted by the College of Business at that time. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings Existing NMU library resources will be appropriate for this course. In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. j. How will you meet these costs? Not applicable. 98
  • 99. 99 k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None m. Implementation Date BUS 595 will be scheduled as deemed appropriate by the MBA Program Director. 99
  • 100. 100 NEW COURSE PROPOSAL BUS 598 Directed Studies in Business Administration a. Bulletin Description (i) BUS 598 Directed Studies in Business Administration 1-4 credit hours Prerequisites: Approval of MBA Program Director This class provides unique opportunities for individual students to concentrate on areas that are not ordinarily covered in the core classes or to delve more deeply into an area of interest introduced in a core class (ii) Students are required to have completed at least 30 credit hours of the MBA graduate curriculum, and the approval of the program director. (iii) BUS 598 Directed Studies (iv) Not applicable b. Rationale (i) Why is there a need for this new course? This class can enrich the MBA experience for students by allowing them to concentrate on areas that are not ordinarily covered in the core classes or to delve more deeply into an area of interest introduced in a core class. (ii) Show how the proposal fits into the overall program. 1. This course is a component of the MBA program. 2. This is an elective course in the program. The 500-level number is consistent with graduate courses throughout the university. (iii) Alignment with mission statement This course is fully aligned with the goals of the MBA program, the College of Business’s mission, and the Road Map to 2015 strategic document. (iv) Not applicable c. Course Number 100
  • 101. 101 This is an experiential course to be taken by students advanced into the MBA program. BUS prefix is being used to identify all graduate courses offered by the College of Business. d. Course Credits Course credits will range from 1-4 credits as determined by the Program Director. e. Course Outline Directed study programs will be designed and approved by the MBA program director. f. Course Objectives This objective is to enrich the MBA experience for students by allowing them to concentrate on areas that are not ordinarily covered in the core classes or to delve into an area of interest introduced in a core class. g. Staffing There is not necessarily additional cost for staffing this course. The College of Business has several academically qualified faculty members who can teach graduate level courses. Any of them could teach BUS 598. In addition, professionals may be afforded the opportunity at some time in the future to teach the class. That cost would be budgeted by the College of Business at that time. h. Equipment and Supplies None i. Library and Required Readings Existing NMU library resources will be appropriate for this course. In developing the MBA program, the College has been in consultation with Mr. Michael Strahan, Reference Librarian, in assessing the library’s holdings and access to on-line materials needed to support the needs of this program. The available resources are consistent with peer institutions offering MBA programs. j. How will you meet these costs? Not applicable. k. Effects on Other Departments None Copy of the MBA proposal has been provided to all the Deans. l. Deletion of Courses None 101
  • 102. 102 m. Implementation Date BUS 598 will be scheduled as deemed appropriate by the MBA Program Director. 102