SCHOOL OF MARKETING
                    FACULTY OF BUSINESS




                        Degree in Marketing
              ...
Contents

                     A Message from Head of Marketing Studies


                     Academic Calendar for Year
...
Introduction and Welcome:


I would like to welcome all students back after the summer break for the
2006/2007 academic ye...
Degree in Marketing Year Three
                              Academic Calendar 2007/2008
                          Week   ...
Please Note: These dates should not be considered binding. They are indicative only and are
  subject to change. They are ...
Course Structure 2007/2008
Year 3                                   ECTS

Semester One:
INTERNATIONAL
EXCHANGE ABROAD     ...
Planning for Fourth Year Dissertation
Students are required to complete a dissertation at the end of their fourth year. Th...
Students will find the dissertation a challenging but rewarding endeavour. The detailed
application of many elements of ea...
The Options and Option Subjects
It is the objective of the programme that the provision of options will allow students to
...
Year Three Subjects
                                         (Semester One)




Perspectives on International Marketing

T...
COURSE CODE:                                          DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                     ...
5.2 Change agents in the International Environment
Export facilitating activities available to firms, financial and inform...
8.0      Reading List

Essential Reading

Bradley, F. (2002) International Marketing Strategy, 4th Edition, London, Prenti...
Recommended Journals

Columbia Journal of World Business
European Journal of Marketing
Harvard Business Review
Internation...
COURSE CODE:                                          DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                     ...
o   Assemble the critical issues in discussions on oil, hunger, debt, war, currency, MNC’s, inequality,
          globalis...
Essential Reading
David N. Balaam and Michael Veseth, Introduction to International Political Economy, 2nd edt (Prentice-
...
COURSE CODE:                                           DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                    ...
- Groups & Teams
 - Management and Leadership (traditional, behavioural, situational leaders)
 - Images of Organisations (...
McGregor, D (1957) "The Human Side of Enterprise". In Adventure in Thought and Action, Proceedings of
 the Fifth Anniversa...
COURSE CODE:                                           DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                    ...
series of workshops and seminars. Most of these will take place in the first two weeks of the programme.
They will provide...
Recommended Reading
Lock, D: The Essentials of Project Management, 2nd ed., Gower, Hampshire, England

Drew, S & Bingham, ...
COURSE CODE:                                          DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                     ...
Theories of the Firm. Transaction costs economics: Principals and Agency. Boundaries of the Firm.
 Economic theories of Fi...
Marketing Options (Choose One)

COURSE CODE:                                         DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:      ...
Module Content

         Overview and Introduction to Business to Business: Understanding the structure and
         natur...
www.practitioner.com Well presented site of the Industrial Marketing Practitioner

www.b2b.lution.com E commerce services ...
COURSE CODE:                                         DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                      ...
Creative strategies for traditional and new media
 Direct and interactive marketing media: web, mobile, interactive televi...
COURSE CODE:                                          DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                     ...
The Business Idea
 Models for new ventures, idea generation, screening ideas, business analysis, and feasibility studies.
...
RECOMMENDED READING

 Birley, S. and Muzyka, D (2000) - Mastering Entrepreneurship: Complete MBA Companion in
 Entrepreneu...
COURSE CODE:                                          DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                     ...
Role of the salesperson in the value creation process.

The sales process.

Organizational buying behaviour.

Business-to-...
COURSE CODE:                                            DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                   ...
Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this module, the learner will be able to:


         Appreciate and understand the ro...
Module Assessment
Individual and group based computer assessments are envisaged whereby the various techniques
developed a...
COURSE CODE:                                            DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                   ...
Learning and Teaching Methods:

 The teaching philosophy for this course is to blend the theory and practice of services m...
Recommended Websites
www.amarach.com
www.smps.org/
www.mii.ie
www.crmguru.com/
www.esf.com



.




marketing-degree1275.d...
Degree in Marketing

                                     Year Three Modules
                                      (Semest...
COURSE CODE:                                            DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                   ...
5.0     Subject Matter

5.1     Consumer Behaviour – an Introduction
        The importance of understanding consumer beha...
Structure and function. Attitude-Behaviour relationship - recognition of “other factors” in
        establishing this rela...
Discussion texts:
           Arvidsson, A. (2000) “The Therapy of Consumption Motivation Research and the New Italian
    ...
Brown, S. (1993), “Postmodern Marketing: Principles, Practice, and Panaceas,” Irish Marketing
        Review, 6: 91-100.

...
Bourdieu, P. (1984), Distinction, Routledge.

        Coleman, R. (1991), “The Continuing Significance of Social Class to ...
The course will be delivered through weekly lectures and tutorials. The lectures will address the theoretical
issues and d...
COURSE CODE:                                         DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                      ...
5.2 Financial Planning: Planning for the future. Preparing projected financial statements. Forecasting
sales, costs and ba...
COURSE CODE:                                          DT341 Degree in Marketing
YEAR:                                     ...
Reading: Text Chapter 5

Schramm, W. (1955), “How Communication Works”, from The Process and Effects of Mass
Communication...
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Marketing Degree

  1. 1. SCHOOL OF MARKETING FACULTY OF BUSINESS Degree in Marketing DT341-3 Year Three YEARBOOK 2007-2008 /home/pptfactory/temp/20100430124707/marketing-degree1275.doc 04/30/10 12:47 A4/P4
  2. 2. Contents A Message from Head of Marketing Studies Academic Calendar for Year Course Structure 2007-2008 Planning for Fourth Year Dissertation The Semester One Options: Overview Summary Syllabi for Subjects Continuous Assessment Guidelines DIT Style Guide 2007-2008 DIT Computer Regulations DIT Organisation Structure marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  3. 3. Introduction and Welcome: I would like to welcome all students back after the summer break for the 2006/2007 academic year. For many of you this will be the third year of the Marketing Degree course; for others you will be joining the course, having successfully achieved distinction or credit grades in other marketing courses. For all of you this will be both an interesting and challenging year. The Third Year has two important differences in comparison to what you have previously encountered. Firstly, the year’s total examination results are a combination of two semesters work, not just the May examination period. Secondly, again this year offers you the opportunity to select your own choice from the range of marketing options in semester one. Here you can focus on an element of the marketing discipline that may be of personal or academic interest or perhaps reflect a career path you wish to follow and one not taken previously. In addition, your chosen option may provide you with an area for exploration for your final year dissertation proposal, which you will develop this year. I wish you all every success for the year Roger Sherlock, Head of Department of Marketing Studies, DIT Faculty of Business, School of Marketing. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  4. 4. Degree in Marketing Year Three Academic Calendar 2007/2008 Week Week No. Details SEMESTER ONE September 2007 17/09/07 1 Lectures Commence 24/09/07 2 October 01/10/07 3 08/10/07 4 15/10/07 5 22/10/07 6 29/10/07 7 Reading Week November 05/11/07 8 12/11/07 9 19/11/07 10 26/11/07 11 December 03/12/07 12 10/12/07 13 Lectures End 17/12/07 Christmas 24/12/07 Christmas 31/12/07 Christmas January 2008 7/01/08 14 Semester Examinations 14/01/08 15 Semester Examinations 21/01/08 SEMESTER TWO 28/01/08 1 Semester Two Lectures Commence February 04/02/08 2 111/02/08 3 18/02/08 4 25/02/08 5 March 03/03/08 6 10/03/08 7 17/03/08 Easter Break 24/03/08 Easter Break 31/03/08 8 Lectures Resume April 07/04/08 9 14/04/08 10 21/04/08 11 28/04/08 12 Lectures End 05/05/08 13 Reading Week May 12/05/08 14 Examinations Commence 19/05/08 15 26/05/08 02/06/08 June 09/06/08 16/06/08 Results Published marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  5. 5. Please Note: These dates should not be considered binding. They are indicative only and are subject to change. They are supplied now on a best-estimate basis to assist students making provisional outline plans for the coming academic year and for the summer of 2008. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  6. 6. Course Structure 2007/2008 Year 3 ECTS Semester One: INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE ABROAD 30 (Language Exchange 25 ECTS) or: Semester One Organisation & the Individual 5 Perspectives on International Marketing 5 International Political Economy 5 Marketing Option (not taken previously) 5 co-based research project 5 Strategy Economics 5 SemesterTwo Consumer Behaviour 5 Financial Analysis 5 Marketing Analysis I 5 Marketing Communications 5 Research Methods 5 Strategic Marketing 5 Language + 5 ECTS TOTAL 60 marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  7. 7. Planning for Fourth Year Dissertation Students are required to complete a dissertation at the end of their fourth year. The dissertation of approximately 20,000 words is an integral part of the degree course and involves a literature review on a particular topic and appropriate primary research. Students are required during their Third year to have selected (and have had approved ) a suitable topic on which the fourth year dissertation is to be completed Aim of the Dissertation The dissertation challenges the student to apply concepts, theories and analytical techniques gained throughout the four years of the degree course to the elucidation and resolution of a particular business problem or issue - normally in the area of marketing management. The aim of the dissertation is to enable the student to undertake a learning ‘journey’ which is largely self-directed and self-motivated, and which is substantially different to the pedagogy encountered to date. It allows the student the opportunity to integrate the various dimensions and domains of knowledge acquired thus far, and so becomes a capstone subject. It also offers the student the chance to concentrate on and specialise in a subject discipline and/or sectoral field of marketing, which may subsequently become a focus of career aspiration. Subject Matter The subject matter of the dissertation includes: - A statement of the problem to be researched. - A review of relevant academic literature. - A report on the appropriate business or industry sector. - A qualitative or quantitative paradigm. - Data collection. - Data analysis. - Conclusions to the study. Support & Supervision The development of the dissertation begins in 3rd year of the degree course. A seminar is be held in the 1st term of 3rd year to start the process of topic selection. This is followed by small group workshops in the 2nd term, by the end of which each student submits a completed dissertation proposal, which is assessed by the year dissertation co-ordinator. Based on satisfactory proposals, each student is assigned a supervisor at the start of the 4th year of the course, who provides contact and guidance throughout the dissertation study, through regular and systematic meetings. A number of seminars on dissertation development complement the individual supervision. The dissertation report is completed and submitted by the end of the 3rd term in the 4th year. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  8. 8. Students will find the dissertation a challenging but rewarding endeavour. The detailed application of many elements of earlier-studied subjects, combined with real-world contact and problems provides an invaluable integrative learning experience. This experience and the tangible result in the form of the printed and bound document is often found to be helpful to students in their early career job-seeking. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  9. 9. The Options and Option Subjects It is the objective of the programme that the provision of options will allow students to have a more focused expertise in their chosen paths and thus enrich their understanding of the core subjects. This will increase their attractiveness to employers. It is also expected that the availability to employers of a broader range of specialists within the marketing area will increase the market overall for marketing graduates. Students will have already taken an option worth 10 ECTS credits in year two. In the first semester of third year the students can choose an option not previously taken in year two, in addition to core subjects. Options are offered to students across a number of courses in a modular form. In addition, there will be Erasmus students and students from year two of this degree taking subjects that comprise the option. OPTIONS AND OPTION SUBJECTS Marketing Options (choose ONE Only)* Sales Services Marketing Direct & Interactive Marketing Business-to-Business Marketing Enterprise Development Management Science 1 * Note for students who have completed DT341-2 you must choose an option not previously taken. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  10. 10. Year Three Subjects (Semester One) Perspectives on International Marketing The International Political Economy Organisational Behaviour and the Individual Company-Based Research Project Strategy Economics Marketing Option marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  11. 11. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three (Semester 1) SUBJECT TITLE: Perspectives on International Marketing ECTS CREDITS: 5 1.0 Subject Area The central focus of this course is the examination of the strategic and operational marketing issues facing firms in an increasingly complex and volatile environment. 2.0 Relevance for the student of Marketing This study of alternative firm perspectives in International Marketing is concerned with the strategic and operational marketing issues which arise in responding to and coping with the key forces at work in the international arena, namely those of globalization, changes in communications technologies and increased consumer power. There are few companies that are not affected by trends in international markets. To succeed in such an environment managers must be flexible and able to develop and implement dynamic international marketing strategies. It is necessary therefore to understand alternative firm perspectives whether they are service, manufacturing or B2B focused activities, and also to appreciate the challenges faced by smaller indigenous firms and the facilitating services available to them. All strategies are affected and constrained by the environment within which they are implemented and the content of this course reflects on the key environmental issues affecting firms operating internationally. 3.0 Aims of the Course The aim of the course is to further the students appreciation of the core concepts of International Marketing by focusing on firm perspectives and identifying topical and emerging issues in the environment surrounding such firms and their activities. 4.0 Learning Outcomes Examining the course content should enable the student, to appreciate the complexity of the international environment and analyze the key environmental impact on the firm and develop strategies to manage such influences, to develop international marketing strategies for consumer products firms, industrial product firms and service firms, irrespective of size or ownership structure, and to develop appropriate international marketing sales and negotiations strategies. 5.0 Subject Matter 5.1 Market Groupings & Economic Integration Forms of economic integration. Regional market characteristics. European Union and implications of an expanded EU, NAFTA etc. Strategic implications for international marketing. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  12. 12. 5.2 Change agents in the International Environment Export facilitating activities available to firms, financial and informational assistance. Role of state agencies Enterprise Ireland, Bord Bia etc, financial service providers, international organisations, WTO etc. in facilitating international and export activity. 5.3 Export Trade Mechanics & Logistics Sourcing finance for exporting, facilities of banks and state agencies. Methods of payment for exporting, invoice discounting/factoring. Export credit insurance. Financial risk and risk management. Export order and physical distribution. 5.4 The Services Firm in International Markets Growth in services trade world-wide. Issues in the International marketing of services. Internationalising the service firm and market entry modalities for services. 5.5 The Industrial Products Firm in International Markets Nature of industrial markets. Selling & promoting industrial products. Network perspective on internationalising business firms. 5.6 The impact of e-commerce on International Marketing The development of e commerce and its effects on international marketing. Impact of e commerce on the marketing programme and entry strategies and market modalities. Components of the electronic value chain. 5.7 Personal Selling & Negotiations Selling in International markets, the international selling sequence. Understanding cross cultural communications, recruitment and management of an international sales force. Cross-cultural negotiations. 5.8 Emerging Markets & Market Behaviour Emerging markets; Eastern Europe & the Baltic States, Asia, The Americas etc. Stages of economic development and objectives of such countries. Changing market behaviour and international market segmentation. 6.0 Learning Strategy Lectures, case study analysis and presentation, as well as guest lecturers will be used to develop students’ awareness and understanding of the key issues. 7.0 Assessment Strategy Assessment % Allocated Continuous Assessment 40 % End of Year examination 60 % marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  13. 13. 8.0 Reading List Essential Reading Bradley, F. (2002) International Marketing Strategy, 4th Edition, London, Prentice-Hall. Recommended Reading: Cateora P.R & Graham J.L. (2002) International Marketing, 11th Edition, Mc Graw-Hill. Cateora P.R & Ghauri P.N, (2000) International Marketing, European Edition, Mc Graw-Hill. Recommended Web Resources Enterprise Ireland, the agency for export development in Ireland. http://www.irish-trade.ie IntertradeIreland http://www.intertradeireland.com Bord Failte http://www.irishtouristboard.ie Central Statistics Office http://www.cso.ie Europa Server (European Commission) http://www.europa.eu.int Irish Exporters Association http://ww.irishexport.ie Economic data sources for OECD countries http://www.oecd.org and http://www.oecd.org/publications/fugures.index.htm World Trade Organisation http://www.wto.org Central & Eastern Europe country information http://www.itaip.doc.gov/eebic/ceebic.html Euromonitor http://www.euromonitor.com A summary of International Business Resources on the web from Michigan State University, Centre for International Business Education and Research. http://ciber.bus.msu.edu/busres.htm International Business Resources http://www.ciber.bus.msu.edu/busres.htm marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  14. 14. Recommended Journals Columbia Journal of World Business European Journal of Marketing Harvard Business Review International Business Review International Marketing Review Irish Marketing Review Journal of Global Marketing Journal of International Business Studies Journal of International Marketing Journal of Marketing Long Range Planning Management International Review Sloan Management Review marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  15. 15. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three (semester 1) SUBJECT TITLE: The International Political Economy ECTS CREDITS: 5 1.0 Subject Area International Political Economy International Political Economy (IPE) is the rapidly developing social science field of study that attempts to understand international and global problems using an eclectic interdisciplinary array of analytical tools and theoretical perspectives. The growing prominence of IPE as a field of study is in part a result of the continuing breakdown of disciplinary boundaries between economics, international relations and politics in particular and among the social sciences generally. Increasingly, the most pressing and interesting problems are those that can best be understood from a multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, or transdisciplinary point of view. IPE is the study of a problématique, or set of related problems. The traditional IPE problématique includes analysis of the political economy of international trade, international finance, North-South relations, multinational corporations, and hegemony. This problématique has been broadened in recent years as many scholars have sought to establish a New IPE that is less centered on International Politics and the problems of the nation-state and less focused on economic policy issues. 2.0 Relevance for the Student of Marketing The purpose of the course is to provide the international marketer with: An informed perspective on the institutions and policy processes that shape economic relations between international and national factors and among economic blocs as a foundation for a lifelong career in marketing, and The substantive base and analytical tools necessary for acquiring an informed perspective on international markets. 3.0 Aim of the Course o To offer a programme of multidisciplinary learning in the study of modern society. o To develop an integrated analysis of social problems and issues, using tools and methods of political science, anthropology, and sociology as informed by an understanding of history and tempered by appreciation of culture and cultural differences o To develop both the theoretical and practical analytical competence required to understand and shape, diverse and dynamic international business environments. 4.0 Learning Outcomes Students should be able to o Understand students with the most common IPE perspectives (economic) liberalism, mercantilism, and Marxist-structuralism. o Comprehensively understand the structures, problems, and institutions of trade, finance, security, and knowledge. o Understand the methods by which international political relations are mediated, both informally and legally. o Have a multi-perspective, non-dogmatic understanding of state-market relations—Deals with the EU; NAFTA; Japan; the Transition states; and North-South issues. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  16. 16. o Assemble the critical issues in discussions on oil, hunger, debt, war, currency, MNC’s, inequality, globalisation and the environment and form their own opinions, regarding all sides of these issues. 5.0 Subject Matter The course has five sections: I. PERSPECTIVES ON INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. 1. What Is International Political Economy? 2. Wealth and Power: Mercantilism and Economic Nationalism. 3. “Laissez-Faire, Laissez-Passer”: The Liberal IPE Perspective. 4. Marx, Lenin, and the Structuralist Perspective. 5. Critical Perspectives on International Political Economy. II. IPE STRUCTURES: PRODUCTION, FINANCE, SECURITY AND KNOWLEDGE. 6. International Trade. 7. The International Monetary System. 8. Debt: The Political Economy of International Finance. 9. The Global Security Structure. 10. Knowledge and Technology: The Basis of Wealth & Power. III. STATE-MARKET TENSIONS TODAY. 11. The European Union: The Economics and Politics of Integration. 12. Democracy and Markets: The IPE of NAFTA. 13. Japan and the Developmental State. 14. States and Markets in Transition. IV. IPE NORTH AND SOUTH. 15. The Two Faces of Development. 16. The Changing IPE of Multinational Corporations. 17. The IPE of OPEC and Oil. V. GLOBAL PROBLEMS. 18. The IPE of Food and Hunger. 19. The Environment: The Green Side of IPE. 20. Where Do We Go from Here? 6.0 Learning Strategy A reading pack will be provided at the start of the course- typically requiring the preparation of one paper per class. Course work consists of lectures, readings, class and small group discussions, a number of movies or documentaries, attendance outside of class at a number of college or department lectures, one essay and one examination. 7.0 Assessment Strategy Assessment % Allocated Class Participation/Preparation 10 % Continuous Assessment 40 % End of Year examination 50 % 8.0 Reading List marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  17. 17. Essential Reading David N. Balaam and Michael Veseth, Introduction to International Political Economy, 2nd edt (Prentice- Hall, 2001). Recommended Reading Course Packet for IPE Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation (Perennial, 2001). Karen A. Mingst and Margaret P. Karns, The United Nations in the Post-Cold War Era,” Westview, 2nd edtn, 2000. David P. Forsythe, Human Rights in International Relations, Cambridge University Press, 2000. Margaret Keck and Kathryn Sikkink, Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics, Cornell University Press, 1998. Richard Butler, The Greatest Threat: Iraq, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and the Crisis of Global Security, Public Affairs, 2000. Robert Gilpin, The Challenge of Global Capitalism (Princeton University Press, 2000). George Crane and Abla Amawi, The Theoretical Evolution of International Political Economy, 2nd edition, (Oxford University Press, 1997). Theodore H. Cohn, Global Political Economy: Theory and Practice, 2nd edition, (Longman, 2003). Recommended Web Resources Through the DIT library site eJournals: Foreign Policy Magazine Review of International Political Economy marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  18. 18. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three (semester 1) SUBJECT TITLE: Organisation Behaviour and the Individual ECTS CREDITS: 5 Module author: Marian Crowley-Henry Module Description: This is a module in Organisational Behaviour for third year Marketing students. Subject Area It is essential for students to understand people’s actions, as individuals and in groups, in the business environment and in organisations. This behaviour affects all aspects of organisational life including motivation, work satisfaction and turnover. This course gives students a solid foundation in organisational behaviour. The module moves from individual concepts (such as personality), to how we construct our reality, to working in groups, to leadership, business ethics and managing diversity. It aims to give the correct grounding for handling these topics in the practical world by balancing theory and contemporary research with practical application in group projects and class discussions. Module aim The aim of this module in Organisational Behaviour is to: - provide students with a foundation in Organisational Behaviour, by familiarising students with relevant theories and key literature in the area - offer students the opportunity for self analysis and to interact with others by working together in teams - instil the value of effective leadership in increasing organisational effectiveness through people - encourage students to discuss and critique rhetoric with practice Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, students will understand the theoretical concepts covered and their practical implications for managers. They will be able to discuss the complexity of issues in organisational behaviour which are relevant in the contemporary business environment. This is an introductory course in Organisational Behaviour and covers many areas in order to give students an insight into the subject. The need for individual personal self reflection and continuous questioning and learning will be stressed, as well as the value and challenges of working in teams. Learning and Teaching Methods: This module is taught over a total of twenty-four hours of lectures, two hours per week, in the first semester. The lectures focus on relevant theories in the subject, with debate and discussion encouraged in class. Students are expected to participate in class, through both self directed learning and preparing readings in advance. Module content: This module covers the following content (order of coverage in class may change) - Organisational Behaviour in its entirety – an overview, tying together the subject - Individual Characteristics (including Personality and Social Constructionism) - Motivation and Empowerment marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  19. 19. - Groups & Teams - Management and Leadership (traditional, behavioural, situational leaders) - Images of Organisations (organisational metaphors) - Fordism and post-Fordism. Contemporary organisational challenges - from the organisation man to the transactional psychological contract. Knowledge work. Diversity - Power & Politics (individual (personal power), organisational, social). Ethical considerations - Managing change - International dimensions of Organisational Behaviour Module Assessment Class Participation/Preparation: 20% Group assignment (practical): 30% Final end of term exam (theory, discussion): 50% Essential Reading: Ellis, S and Dick, P (2005) Introduction to Organizational Behaviour, Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Supplemental Reading (in alphabetical order): Adler, N, (1997) International dimensions of organizational behaviour, Cincinnati, South-Western College Publishing Bass, B M (1990) “From transactional to transformational leadership: Learning to share the vision”, Organizational Dynamics, (Winter), pp 19-31 Berger, Peter L and Luckman, T (1966) The Social Construction of Reality, Garden City, NY, Doubleday Braverman, H [1974] (1998) Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century, NY, Monthly Review Press Burrell, G and Morgan, G (1979) Sociological Paradigms and Organizational Analysis, London, Heinemann Clegg, S R (1990) Modern Organizations: Organization Studies in the Postmodern World, London, Sage Deetz, S (1998) “Discursive Formations, Strategized subordination and self surveillance”. In McKinlay, A and Starkey, K. (eds.), Foucault, Management and Organization Theory, London, Sage Fayol, H [1916] (1949) General and Industrial Management, London, Pitman, (C Storrs., Trans.) Goleman, D (1995) Emotional Intelligence. What it can matter more than IQ, NY, Bantam Gratton, L and Hope-Hailey, V (1999) “The Rhetoric and Reality of 'New Careers'”, In Gratton, L, Hope- Haliey, V, Stiles, P and Truss, C, eds., Strategic Human Resource Management. Corporate Rhetoric and Human Reality, London, Oxford University Press Herzberg, F (1966) Work and the Nature of Man, Cleveland, World Kahn, W A (1996), “Secure base relationships at work”. In Hall, D T and Associates, eds., The Career is Dead - Long Live the Career, San Francisco, Jossey-Bass Katz, D and Kahn, R L (1966) The Social Psychology of Organizations, NY, John Wiley Kotter, J P (1999) John P Kotter on What Leaders Really Do, Harvard Business School Press Latour, B (1986), “The powers of association”. In Law, J, ed. Power, Action and Belief: a New Sociology of Knowledge, London, Routledge & Keegan Paul. Sociological Review Monograph 32 marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  20. 20. McGregor, D (1957) "The Human Side of Enterprise". In Adventure in Thought and Action, Proceedings of the Fifth Anniversary Convocation of the M.I.T. School of Industrial Management, June 1957, pp. 23-30; also (in condensed form) in The Management Review, 1957, 46, No. 11, 22-28 Minzberg, H (1973) The Nature of Managerial Work, Harper & Row, New York Mintzberg, H (1975) “The Manager's Job: Folklore and Fact”, Harvard Business Review, July/August Mintzberg, H (1976) “Planning on the left side and managing on the right”, Harvard Business Review, July-August 1976, Vol 54, pp 49-58 Morgan, G (1997) Images of Organization, 2nd ed., Newbury Park, Ca, Sage Peter, T and Waterman, R Jr. (1982) In Search of Excellence, NY, Warner Pfeffer, J and Salancik, G (1978) The External Control of Organizations: A Resource Dependence Perspective, NY, Harper and Row Rousseau, D M (1995) Psychological contracts in organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Senge, P (1990) The Fifth Discipline, NY, Doubleday Currency Simon, H (1957) Administrative Behavior, NY, The Free Press Smircich, L (1983) “Studying Organizations as Culture”. In Morgan, G, ed., Beyond Method: Strategies for Social Research, Beverly Hills, Ca, Sage Starkey, K and McKinlay, A (1998) “Deconstructing Organization - discipline and desire”. In McKinlay, A and Starkey, K, eds., Foucault, Management, and Organization Theory, London, Sage. Swart, J and Kinnie, J (2004) Managing the Careers of Professional Knowledge Workers, London, CIPD Taylor, F (1911) The Principles of Scientific Management, NY, Harper & Row Turner, R (1976) "The real self: from institution to impulse", American Journal of Sociology, Vol 81, No 5, pp. 989-1016 Weber, M [1922] (1947) The Theory of Social and Economic Organization, NY, The Free Pressof Glencoe, (A.M. Henderson and Talcott Prasons, Trans.) Weick, K (1979) The Social Psychology of Organizing, 2nd ed., NY, McGraw-Hill Weick, K (1995) Sensemaking in Organizations. Foundations for Organizational Science, Thousand Oaks, Ca, Sage Whetten, D, Cameron, K and Woods, M (2000) Developing Management Skills for Europe, Essex: Prentice Hall Zaleznik, A (1992) “Managers and Leaders Are they different?”, Harvard Business Review Further sources may be communicated in class and/or via webex during the semester Web references, journals and other: This list is not exhaustive but exemplary of reference sources. Emerald: http://ariel.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/urlResolver.do?uri=%2Fvl%3D2208825%2Fcl %3D46%2Fnw%3D1%2Frpsv%2Findex.htm http://www.peoplemanagement.co.uk/pm Journal of Organizational Behaviour International Journal of Organizational Behaviour Journal of Organizational Change Management International Journal of Cross Cultural Management Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change Strategic Management Journal marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  21. 21. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Company Based Research Project ECTS CREDITS: 5 1.0 Subject Area The subject involves the examination and reporting on a specific marketing problem in a selected business or other organisation. The organisation will, in association with the academic staff of the School of Marketing, select a suitable issue which can be addressed by a group of, typically, five students over a semester. Groups will be selected by the project leader. They will not be self selecting because, in addition to the cohort who will have come through the direct route, there will be advanced entry students joining the programme at this point as well as Erasmus and other short term stay students The students will prepare a report in consultancy format for presentation to the company, their peers and academic staff at the conclusion of the semester. Examples of projects which are likely to be considered include market research, new product or service development and/or launch, developing a communications strategy, brand development, marketing strategy development, marketing plan, competitive analysis, channel selection, supply chain management or not for profit marketing. 2.0 Relevance for the Student of Marketing Students undertaking this project have completed two years of a marketing oriented programme. This project offers the student the opportunity to test the marketing theoretical framework in a practical and realistic way. It provides valuable experience of consultancy and report preparation and presentation as a prelude to the case based programmes in fourth year and entry into the world of work on graduation 3.0 Aim of the Course The course aims to develop the ability of the student to make marketing decisions which are typical of those experienced in the contemporary Irish and/or international marketing environment and to present those decisions in a manner appropriate to a business environment. 4.0 Learning Outcomes On completion of the course, students will have will have attained a high level of competence in the following: 4.1 Understanding the nature of real life marketing problems faced by organisations 4.2 Applying marketing theory and techniques to a real and defined marketing problem 4.3 Undertaking market research 4.4 Making and justifying marketing decisions 4.5 Report preparation and presentation 4.6 Working and learning effectively in small groups 4.7 Understanding the scale and scope of organisations, including their turnover, management structure and roles 5.0 Subject Matter The core of the course is the project which will be carried out in a group of five at the behest of the organisation selected. By way of preparation for the project, students will be required to participate in a marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  22. 22. series of workshops and seminars. Most of these will take place in the first two weeks of the programme. They will provide students with the following: 5.1 An introduction to the programme 5.2 Working and learning in small groups 5.3 Client management 5.4 Project management 5.5 Sourcing information 5.6 Report writing skills 5.7 Report presentation skills 6.0 Learning Strategy The learning strategy employed for this project is that of self directed learning aided by the facilitation of an academic supervisor for each group and an in-company executive available to support the group as required. In addition to the seminars and workshops referred to above, as the programme develops, it is proposed to run a series of workshops attended by previous participants and company personnel who have provided projects for the programme 7.0 Assessment Strategy The course will be assessed on the basis of the project undertaken. Each group will be required to develop and maintain a learning log. This log should detail meetings held, minutes recorded, attendance, decisions made, tasks assigned and tasks completed. The assessment will take three forms. Each group will be required to present an interim report midway through the semester. On completion of the programme, a final report will be prepared and presented. Each of these will be graded. The criteria used will include developing a detailed understanding of the problem, identifying and making appropriate use of sources of information, developing workable solutions to the problem or problems identified and outlining implementation strategies. Finally a proportion of the marks will be set aside for peer assessment by other members of the group on an individual basis. This will reflect the individual contributions as recorded in the learning log. Each participant, assuming a group size of five members, will award up to five marks to each other participant. These marks will be reported on a confidential basis to the group supervisor who will then aggregate them. Where the group size varies from the norm of five, marks will be awarded pro rata to maintain the 20% weighting Assessment % Allocated Interim report 20% Final report 60% Peer assessment 20% 8.0 Reading List Essential Reading No essential reading is prescribed for this course. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  23. 23. Recommended Reading Lock, D: The Essentials of Project Management, 2nd ed., Gower, Hampshire, England Drew, S & Bingham, R: The Students Skills Guide, 2nd ed., Gower, Hampshire, England Recommended Web Resources www.studentskills.org Microsoft Project marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  24. 24. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Strategy Economics ECTS CREDITS: 5 Module author: Brendan O’Rourke . Module Description: This modules addresses issues in strategy economics, in particular how economics contributes to the application and understandings of corporate strategy. The module will involve the application and critique of strategy economics theories and critical reflection on the use of the economics perspective in management learning. Module aim The aim of this module is to enable students to acquire from the strategy economics the theoretical background, critical thinking and ability to integrate theoretical insights necessary for business in general and strategic management in particular. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to Be able to acquire and apply strategy economic theories to problems of corporate strategy Be able to select appropriate strategy economic theories to apply to particular problems of corporate strategy Be critical of particular strategy economic theories and concepts Be critically reflective about the use of the economic perspective in corporate strategy Learning and Teaching Methods: This module will use lectures and tutorials to enable participants learn on this module. Formative assessment and peer-group interaction will also form key elements in the learning strategy on this module Module content: Introduction & Overview. Nature of contributions and limitations of economics to business and strategy. Firms’ Objectives & stakeholders: Debates and theories. Market structure, conduct and performance debates. Analysing sectors. Porter’s five forces. Game theory. Public policy and market competition. Innovation. Grand theories of innovation including Baconian and System of innovation approaches. Early mover advantages and patent races. Diffusion of innovation. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  25. 25. Theories of the Firm. Transaction costs economics: Principals and Agency. Boundaries of the Firm. Economic theories of Firm organization. Module Assessment End of Module Examination 60% Continuous Assessment 40% Essential Reading: Beshanko, D., Dranove D. & Shanley, Schaefer, M (2004) Economics of Strategy, 4th edition,m New York: John Wiley & Sons Supplemental Reading: (other references will be given during classes) Brickley, J.A., Smith, C.W., and Zimmer, J.L. (2004) .Managerial Economics and Organizational Architecture (3rd edition) Boston: McGraw-Hill Irwin. Hunt, S.D. (2000) A General Theory of Competition - Resources, Competences, Productivity and Economic Growth London:Sage Jacobson, D. and Andreosso B. (2005) Industrial Economics and Organisation: A European Perspective Berkshire: McGraw-Hill. Kay, J. (1995) Foundations of Corporate Success, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Milgrom, P.R. and Roberts, J. (1992) Economics of Organisation and Management London: Prentice- Hall. Moschandreas, M. (2000) Business Economics (2nd edition) London: Business Press/Thomson Learning Rickard, S. (2006). The economics of organisations and strategy. London: McGraw-Hill Web references, journals and other: Recommended Websites include: www.businessworld.ie www.econ.duke.edu/Quicklinks/econ.quicklinks.html www.economist.com www.iod.com www.londoneconomics.com www.merit.unimaas.nl/publications/rm.php www.tca.ie Recommended Periodicals include: British Journal of Management Harvard Business Review International Journal of the Economics of Business Journal of Business Strategy Journal of Economics and Management Strategy Journal of Industrial Economics Strategic Management Journal marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  26. 26. Marketing Options (Choose One) COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Business to Business Marketing ECTS CREDITS: 5 (Option) Module Author: Kathleen Hughes Module Description This module comprises Business to Business Marketing, which provides a foundation for the subsequent study of supply chain management in semester 2. Business to Business Marketing provides the student with a comprehensive understanding of the unique issues and challenges facing the Business Marketer. It builds on the knowledge of Consumer Marketing which the students have already acquired and identifies both similarities and differences between both aspects of marketing. It presents the distinct approaches required in managing the marketing mix when dealing with such complex and dynamic forces as organizational buyer behaviour and relationship management which are unique to this environment. Specifically the impact of technology in managing and building relationships with both customers and suppliers will be explored Module Aim The overall aim of the course is to provide a managerial perspective on the theories and application of marketing in dynamic business marketing environments. The aim of the course is to provide students with a managerial perspective enabling them to address marketing challenges in an industrial context. Students will deepen their understanding of marketing and develop their ability to apply this knowledge in business to business decision making. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the learner will be able to • demonstrate an understanding of the complex forces that are unique to the business marketing environment. • identify the decision processes that organisational buyers apply as they confront different buying situations and ascertain the resulting strategy implications for the business marketer. • competently devise a marketing strategy for the business to business market. • work effectively and efficiently in a team situation Learning and Teaching Methods A variety of learning and teaching methods will be used, including: presentations, class discussion, exercises, video material, case studies and projects. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  27. 27. Module Content Overview and Introduction to Business to Business: Understanding the structure and nature of markets, customers and goods. Identifying the distinguishing characteristics of business marketing and comparing business and consumer marketing practices. Organizational Buyer Behaviour: Organizational buyer behaviour, the goals of the purchasing organization, managing relationships in business to business Strategic Planning and assessing market opportunities: Segmenting the business market, and the business marketing planning process. Managing the Marketing Mix in a Business to Business Context: Developing and managing products, managing the business distribution channel and supply chain, managing pricing, understanding the key elements of the communications mix for business marketers. Module Assessment: Continuous Assessment – this is a group project that requires the study of a business to business marketing company – 40% Examination – 60% Essential Reading Blythe and Zimmerman: Business to Business Marketing Management – A Global Perspective, Thomson Learning, 1st Ed., 2005. www.enterprise-ireland.com Enterprise Ireland website, useful information about Irish industry Useful Web Sites: Organisations: www.ibec.ie Irish Business and Employers Confederation – examine current issues affecting Irish business www.nitl.ie National Institute of Transport and Logistics www.idaireland.com Information on industry in Ireland www.iia.ie Irish Industry Association website which highlights key issues on e-business www.e-tenders.ie Government website listing tender opportunities Industry: www.buildonline.ie Irish section of the European e-construction portal www.finfacts.ie Irish finance portal www.simap.eu.int EU website which promotes best practices in public procurement www.businessmarketing.com Advertising Age business marketing magazine www.businessweek.com Website of the US business magazine Strategy: marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  28. 28. www.practitioner.com Well presented site of the Industrial Marketing Practitioner www.b2b.lution.com E commerce services organisation for business to business markets www.brint.com Business technology and information portal – great source of references marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  29. 29. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Direct and Interactive Marketing ECTS CREDITS: 5 (Option) Module author: Mary Lawlor and John Byrne. Module Description: Direct and Interactive Marketing is now an important and well established marketing discipline that is widely used across many industries. This module is comprised of two integrated elements, direct and interactive marketing and database management. Direct and interactive marketing is designed to provide the learner with the knowledge to make informed decisions in planning a direct marketing campaign. Branding, segmentation and media planning issues in planning for today’s company and consumer who communicate directly with each other is considered. The key challenges and opportunities in using modern interactive media including the web, mobile, interactive television, telemarketing and direct mail are addressed. The database management element will provide the learner with the skills and a comprehensive working knowledge of current advances in marketing information systems to optimise the use of huge volumes of data that is available to the marketer. The learner will become acquainted with state-of-the art techniques for analysing marketing data using the latest data mining tools. Module aim The aim of this module is to: Introduce the learner to the theoretical and conceptual foundations of direct and interactive marketing. Provide the learner with the basic skills in data modelling techniques in order to analyse marketing data. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: develop a fully integrated direct marketing plan design, implement and explore marketing databases apply modern data mining tools to databases Learning and Teaching Methods: A company brief and data will be given to the learner. Direct and interactive marketing This element will combine formal lectures, guest lectures and student presentations Database Management This element will be computer-based-learning in a lab where the student will have hands-on experience with MS Access and SPSS Clementine. Module content: Direct and interactive marketing Customer acquisition management Customer relationship management and customer retention marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  30. 30. Creative strategies for traditional and new media Direct and interactive marketing media: web, mobile, interactive television, direct response press, telemarketing and direct mail Campaign management, response handling and fulfillment Legal and regulatory aspects of direct and interactive marketing Database Management Use of neural networks, rule induction, prediction and clustering models, to examine large data files containing many different dimensions or variables The design principles and practice of creating a working relational database,using MS Access and SPSS Clementine software. Module Assessment This module is 100% individual based assessment. Direct and interactive marketing The learner will be given a company brief at the commencement of the module and will be required to develop a direct marketing campaign for a real live company. The Direct marketing campaign will be presented in report form 50% Database Management This element will be based on a practical lab-based assessment, in which the student will be required to carry out a series of computer-based tasks, using Access and SPSS Clementine which relates to the company brief. 50% Essential Reading: Sargeant, Adrian and Douglas C. West, Direct and Interactive Marketing, Oxford University Press, 2001 Introduction to SPSS Clementine, Computer Manaual Web references, journals and other: Journal of Interactive marketing Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing. Journal of Database Marketing Journal of Direct Marketing Journal of Telephone Marketing www.idma.ie www.theidm.com www.fedma.com marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  31. 31. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Enterprise Development ECTS CREDITS: 5 (Option) Pre-Requisite Co- ECTS Module Module Title Modules Requisite Credits Code code(s) Modules code(s) 5 New Venture Creation/Small Business Management Module Description This subject will cover a diverse range of disciplines as it highlights the universal needs of small enterprises. It will take theories from a broad spectrum of academics and apply them to the practical realities of new and emerging companies. The course is firmly focused on providing the knowledge and developing the skills required to establish a business in Ireland. The main thrust of the course is to develop in the student an understanding of the total skill and knowledge base requirements that are necessitated when establishing one’s own enterprise. This will integrate with their overall marketing studies to educate them in their learning of the particular needs of small businesses. Module Aim: This program is directed towards those who wish to learn about, or have considered, the establishment of a new venture in Ireland. It is designed to promote the areas of entrepreneurship, and to communicate clearly the tools and techniques that would assist in the formation of a business, and reduce the risk of failure in a start-up situation. Learning Outcomes: To increase awareness of the importance of small businesses in Ireland; To deliver relevant information on sources of assistance; To introduce key issues in setting-up and running a small business; To describe the different types of structure and strategies available to the new owner/manager. Module Content Introduction Small firms in the Irish economy, problems faced by small companies, types of entrepreneurs and innovators. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  32. 32. The Business Idea Models for new ventures, idea generation, screening ideas, business analysis, and feasibility studies. Business Plan Purpose and benefits, design of a business plan, layout and content, focused recipient, approaching potential investors. New Business Assistance Enterprise Ireland, City/County Enterprise Boards, BIC, BIM, FAS, Bolton Trust, First Step, ICE, SPADE, etc Legal Aspects Sole trader, partnership, limited company, franchising, licensing, patents, trademarks, and copyrights. Finance Seed funding, venture capital, loans, grants, equity, debt financing, Business Expansion Scheme, VAT, PRSI, PAYE, ratio analysis.5.7 Leadership Teams, small business management, life cycles, types of management structures, routes to success. Operations People and premises, managing key resources, buying the right capital equipment, recruitment and selection of staff, fulfilling skill needs. Human Resource Management Leadership styles, employee motivation, work groups, collective entrepreneurship, team building. Growth Factors leading to growth, managing growth and renewal, problems of growth, setting goals, the profit graph. Learning and Teaching Methods The course will be taught through a formal input of lectures, tutorials, and case studies, backed by guest lecturers. Module Assessment The student’s principal activity will be the development of a Business Plan (which will additionally be entered into the Bolton Trust Student Enterprise Competition and the Enterprise Ireland Student Enterprise Competition). Students can undertake this business plan either in a group of three or four. Business Plan 50% End of Semester Exam 50% ESSENTIAL READING Cooney, T.M. and Hill, S. (2002) – New Venture Creation in Ireland – Oak Tree Press Cooney, T.M. (2005) – Irish Cases in Entrepreneurship – Blackhall marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  33. 33. RECOMMENDED READING Birley, S. and Muzyka, D (2000) - Mastering Entrepreneurship: Complete MBA Companion in Entrepreneurship – Prentice Hall Bridge, S.; O'Neill, K. and Cromie, S. (2003) - Understanding Enterprise, Entrepreneurship and Small Business – Palgrave MacMillan Burns, P. (2001) - Entrepreneurship and Small Business; Paperback –Palgrave MacMillan Jones-Evans, D. and Carter, S. (1999) - Enterprise and Small Business: Principles, Practice and Policy – Prentice Hall O’Kane, B. (2001) - Starting a Business in Ireland - Oak Tree Press. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  34. 34. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Sales ECTS CREDITS: 5 (Option) Module author: Laura Cuddihy. Module Description: The selling function and its management are two major areas of expense for any company. Increasingly, as companies seek to gain advantage in the marketplace through efficiencies and profitable strategies these two areas are being highlighted as being extremely critical in the achievement of corporate goals. Every marketing person will have to sell, if not a good or service in the marketplace, at least an idea, plan or vision to his/her colleagues. In addition, marketing people must buy - advertising services, packaging, sales promotion gifts and the like. A thorough knowledge of how these areas operate will undoubtedly sharpen the commercial abilities of a marketing graduate. Module aim To broaden the appeal of selling of sales as a profession for marketing graduates, and to give those who opt for a mainstream marketing career an understanding of this area, thereby making them more effective and multi-skilled marketing people. The module also serves to prepare students for participating on a two-week US-Austrian sales education programme at the end of the academic year. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, students will de able to: 1. Analyse the decision-making processes and units in organisational buying situations and deliver appropriate communication responses. 2. Construct sales presentations for different business sectors and types of organisations. 3. Understand the importance of selling in the marketing mix. 4. Choose negotiation strategies to achieve win-win solutions. 5. Predict key accounts and design appropriate sales proposals for them. 6. Choose appropriate sales force automation tools for supporting selling. 7. develop effective and efficient self-directed study skills. Learning and Teaching Methods: The learning and teaching strategies will include a combination of lectures, case studies, sales training videos and guest lectures. Students will be required to engage in independent learning in relation to the learning issues emerging from the course work and assessment. Module content: The Inter-relatedness of Sales and Marketing marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  35. 35. Role of the salesperson in the value creation process. The sales process. Organizational buying behaviour. Business-to-business selling. Key account selling. International selling Relationship selling Sales negotiation strategies and tactics Sales automation –process and tools. Module Assessment: This module is assessed through both formative and summative means 60% of the overall mark will be allocated on the basis of individual end-of-semester examinations. 40% will be allocated to continuous assessment which will be based on a written report and oral presentation of a shadow day with a salesperson. Essential Reading: Course Textbooks Daly, D and P. O’Dea, (2004), Select Selling, Cork, Oaktree Press Jobber, D and G. Lancaster, (2006), Selling and Sales Management, 7th Edition, Harlow, Prentice Hall. Useful Websites, journals and other: Journal of Personal Selling and Sales Management Industrial Marketing Management Journal of Business Research Journal of Selling and Major Account Management www.strategicaccounts.org www.mii.ie www.salesinstitute.ie www.selectselling.com marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  36. 36. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Management Science 1 ECTS CREDITS: 5 (Option) Module author: Donncha Ryan Module Description: Marketing involves decisions, some of which are complex and need justification. Deploying resources such as marketing budgets, setting the market mix, managing projects within deadlines, analysing the risk in investments; all these and many other decision contexts can be properly analysed using appropriate techniques and software, and the analysis can yield optimal solutions and guide and inform the decision maker and allow for sensitivity analyses. The benefit and relevance of a scientific and methodological approach to problem formulation and analysis cannot be underestimated, especially when a variety of practical settings form the backdrop and demonstrate the application of the techniques. The course concerns itself with bringing a scientific and analytical focus to a range of business and management issues, which require analysis in terms of committing resources to best effect. The thrust is that of a decision science approach to problem formulation and solution, aided by software and guided by the pragmatics of seeking to deploy limited resources to often complex decision contexts. The exposition will be delivered through a selection of decision contexts such as transportation problems, logistics, product mix problems etc. The skills and capacity for analysis encapsulated in this module are highly valued in the workplace and help place the learner in a strong position in terms of strategic skill sets and can thus serve to differentiate the learner from more generic marketing professionals. Module aim The general aim is that of promoting an approach to decision making for management and marketing professionals which is scientific, structured and makes use of available software tools and techniques. It will be cognisant of and sensitive to the learners’ potential difficulty with employing analytical techniques and will emphasise an applied and example driven approach rather than a theory oriented one. This will involve looking at as wide a variety of marketing and business related problems as possible and formulating well posed problems from loosely structured information, the identification of goals and constraints and decision variables and the subsequent development of a solution. It is also the aim to foster a disposition towards quantitative/spreadsheet analysis, being mindful of any limitations in the analysis and be further capable of communicating the pertinent issues to key stakeholders in the decision scenarios examined. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  37. 37. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: Appreciate and understand the role of management science techniques and their various applications to management and marketing. Develop a mathematical problem from loosely structured information and formulate and communicate these to a wider audience. Solve a representative selection of problems from a variety of decision contexts arising in management science and business, interpret the solutions, and understand and convey their practical implications and limitations. Conduct problem analyses using spreadsheet tools and generate solution reports and interpretations for non technical users. Learning and Teaching Methods: This will comprise of lectures, tutorials, self study assignments and software usage. Particular emphasis and benefit will be attached to computer based analysis using spreadsheets; which will be introduced and utilised in interactive lab based work. Homework based on these lab based problem sets will be given with a view to encouraging the learner to develop an analytic problem solving approach both individually and in group work, leveraging the power of spreadsheets and developing market- valued business analysis skills. Module content: Course content will be drawn from the following range of issues and problem areas with some variation possible from year to year within the time constraints. Introduction to management science: The model building approach, the benefits for business, defining and identifying objectives and resource constraints. Introduction to and usage of key features of the Microsoft excel spreadsheet package: useful functions available, data analysis tools, the SOLVER optimisation tool and data tables. Examples from Finance, logistics, marketing etc. interactive computer lab sessions using excel with xamples. Introduction to linear programming: The formulation and solution of LP problems by graphical and software methods. Examples from marketing and management. Sensitivity analysis. Distribution / Network theory: The transportation, assignment and transhipment type problems. Shortest Route problems, maximal flow, minimal spanning trees. Examples from marketing and management. Introduction to Goal Programming: Prioritisation of goals, formulation of the problem, deviational Variables. Software/graphical solution and discussion with sample problems. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  38. 38. Module Assessment Individual and group based computer assessments are envisaged whereby the various techniques developed and the spreadsheet tools introduced are leveraged in a decision context. The generation of a solution report and its interpretation for a non technical audience will be a primary goal. Continuous assessments/projects/homework 40% End of module written exam 60% Essential Reading: Albright S. C., Winston W. L., 2005.Spreadsheet Modelling and Applications; Essentials of Practical Management Science, Duxbury/Thomson. Render B., Stair, R. M., 1998 Quantitative Analysis for Management, 6th edition, Prentice Hall. Lee S., Moore J., Taylor W. Management Science. Publishers:Allyn and Bacon. 4th Edition. Supplemental Reading: Weiss, QM for Windows (Software) Eppen, G.D., Gould, F.J., Schmidt, C.P. Introductory Management Science. Prentice Hall, 4th Edition. Gordan, G., Pressman, I. Quantitative Decision Making for Business. Prentice Hall. Knowles, Thomas W. Management Science-building and using models Irwin Illinois. Wilkes, Michael. Operations Research -Analysis and applications. McGraw-Hill. Schrage, Linus. LINDO an optimising modelling system : text and software. The Scientific Press, 4th edition. Web references, journals and other: www.solver.com www.frontsys.com www.palisade.com http://www.orsoc.org.uk http://mscmga.ms.ic.ac.uk/jeb/or/contents.html www.imsgrp.com/mssi/index.htm marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  39. 39. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three ( semester 1 ) SUBJECT TITLE: Services Marketing ECTS CREDITS: 5 (Option) Module author: Joseph Mc Grath Module Description: Services Marketing This course builds on the learning achieved in marketing and consumer behaviour studies, and introduces the student to the theoretical and practical knowledge base encountered in the field of services marketing. The course will enable students to gain a deep insight into the particular marketing and management challenges associated with the services sector and provide the knowledge and understanding required to make appropriate responses to the major managerial issues encountered in service sector organisations. Emphasis is placed on integrating knowledge gained from other major component areas of the course, particularly, human resource management, strategy studies and finance. Module aim The aim of this module is to provide students with specific knowledge of services marketing and to develop the intellectual ability to combine this knowledge with other key areas of study in their course to create business and professional success. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: Demonstrate a critical appreciation of the challenges posed by the characteristics of services marketing, principally, intangibility, heterogeneity, inseparability and time/place dependency. Employ appropriate strategies to meet the challenges encountered in the services sector based on a comprehensive knowledge of the theory and practice of service marketing. Analyse typical marketing and management problems encountered in the service sector and be able to structure appropriate responses. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  40. 40. Learning and Teaching Methods: The teaching philosophy for this course is to blend the theory and practice of services marketing in a supportive class environment that promotes active learning through lectures, reflection on real life and theoretical issues and class discussion of problems and challenges encountered in real-life situations. Emphasis is placed on a high level of participation in the classroom by all students. Awareness and reflection on current issues affecting organisations and consumers is encouraged through comment on media coverage of business and class discussion. Module content: The characteristics of services marketing. Consumer behaviour in services. Consumer expectations and perceptions. Understanding the service employee. Roles for employees in service delivery Creating loyal customers. Service Quality Service recovery. The Services Marketing Mix Contempory issues in management and marketing Module Assessment: Reflecting the emphasis placed on class room participation, relating theory to practice and engagement with current business issues, assessment for this module is structured so that learning is evaluated through case study analysis on the application of a selected body of knowledge to a particular service industry or organisation. This project will be assigned on a group basis and students will make presentations on their work to their classmates. – 50% of marks. Examination - 50% of marks . Essential Reading: Services Marketing: Integrating Customer Focus Across The Firm, 4 th edition, Zeithaml, Bitner, Gremler, McGraw-Hill 2006 Students will be given seminal and contempory journal article reading assignments throughout the course. Supplemental Reading: Journals Harvard Business Review Journal of Service Quality Sloan Management Review Irish Marketing Review marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  41. 41. Recommended Websites www.amarach.com www.smps.org/ www.mii.ie www.crmguru.com/ www.esf.com . marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  42. 42. Degree in Marketing Year Three Modules (Semester Two) Consumer Behaviour Financial Analysis Marketing Communications Marketing Analysis 1 Research Methods Strategic Marketing French marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  43. 43. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three SUBJECT TITLE: Consumer Behaviour ECTS CREDITS: 5 1.0 Subject Area This subject provides an overview of the burgeoning role of consumption, including shopping and buying, in contemporary society. It examines the ways in which consumers act on and interpret the presentation and representation of products, and also ways that such practices and dispositions are structured and shaped by social, cultural and market forces. It is basically the study of factors and processes involved in the buying and consumption of products, services and experiences. 2.0 Relevance for the Student of Marketing The central focus of marketing management is the consumer, and in particular the consumer’s needs, wants and desires. Advertising, new product development, sales promotion, and marketing strategy all evolve from an understanding of consumer behaviour. 3.0 Aim of the Course • To critically evaluate the psychological and sociological concepts and theories learnt in first year A Social Science Perspective on Marketing course with regard to their applicability to consumption practices and processes. • To expand knowledge and understanding of those concepts and theories, and also to introduce new theoretical perspectives in the field, e.g. experiential aspects of consumption; hedonic/symbolic consumption; consumer culture; postmodernism; gender; critical approaches to marketing and consumption; discursive psychology; governmentality. • To provide the student with an understanding of how the diversity of concepts and theories combine with research methodologies to investigate various consumption practices and processes, in order to prepare them for the final year Consumer Research course. • To provide the student with both an explanatory and descriptive understanding of the actions and practices of consumers as socially contextualized people rather than isolated individuals. 4.0 Learning Outcomes On completion of the course the student should: • Be able to critically evaluate the role of the social sciences in theories of consumption. • Have developed a critical and creative mode of enquiry and thinking which can be applied across a range of theoretical, empirical and strategic issues. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  44. 44. 5.0 Subject Matter 5.1 Consumer Behaviour – an Introduction The importance of understanding consumer behaviour in the marketing management function. Relative contributions of Economics, Philosophy, Sociology, Psychology, Anthropology, and Semiology. Consumption processes and practices as shaped by cultural, social and psychological factors. History and evolution of consumer behaviour theory. Philosophy of social research and the development of theories of consumption. Recommended reading: Crotty, M. (1998), The Foundations of Social Research: Meaning and Perspective in the Research Process, London: Sage. Holbrook, M. (1995), Consumer Research: Introspective Essays on the Study of Consumption, Sage. Hughes, J. A. (1990) The Philosophy of Social Research, London: Longman. Lazar, D. (1998), “Selected issues in the philosophy of social science”, in C. Seale,ed., Researching Society and Culture, Sage. Olshavsky, R. and Granbois, D. (1991), “Consumer Decision Making – Fact or Fiction?”, in Kassarjian and T. Robertson, eds., (1991), Perspectives in Consumer Behavior, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall. O'Shaughnessy, J. (1992), Explaining Buyer Behavior: Central Concepts and Philosophy of Science Issues, Oxford U. P. 5.2. Consumer Rationality Information search. Consumer decision making strategies. Governmentality and the discursive construction of the rational consumer. Recommended reading: Bagozzi, R. and Dholakia, U. (1999), “Goal Setting and Goal Striving in Consumer Behavior”, Journal of Marketing, 63: 19-32. Desmond, J. (2003), Consuming Behaviour, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave, chapter 3. Hogarth, R. (1987), Judgement and choice: the psychology of decision, 2nd ed., Chichester : Wiley. Discussion texts: Aldridge, A. (1994), “The Construction of Rational Consumption…”, Sociology, 28(4): 899-912. Graham, L. (1997), “Beyond Manipulation…”, The Sociological Quarterly, 38(4): 539-565. 5.3. Attitudes marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  45. 45. Structure and function. Attitude-Behaviour relationship - recognition of “other factors” in establishing this relationship. Attitude change. Attitude measurement. Attitudes in discourse and conversation. Recommended reading: Foxall, G. (1983), Consumer Choice, MacMillan, chapter 3. Lutz, R. (1991), “The Role of Attitude Theory in Marketing”, in Kassarjian and T. Robertson, eds., Perspectives in Consumer Behaviour, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall. Potter, J. and Wetherell, M. (1987), Discourse and social psychology: beyond attitudes and behaviour, London: Newbury Park. Solomon, M. et al (2002), Consumer Behaviour: a European Perspective, 2nd edition, Essex: Pearson Education, chapters 5 & 6. Discussion texts: Allport, G.W. (1966), “Attitudes in the History of Social Psychology”, in M. Jahoda and N. Warren, eds., Attitudes, Penguin. Jahoda, M. et al (1966), “Attitudes under Conditions of Unemployment”, in M. Jahoda and N. Warren, eds., Attitudes, Penguin. Selltiz, C. et al (1966), “Attitude Scaling”, in M. Jahoda and N. Warren, eds., Attitudes, Penguin. Verkuyten, M. (1998), “Attitudes in Public Discourse”, Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 17(3): 302-322. 5.4. Motivation & Emotion Psychoanalytical approaches to the understanding of consumer motivation. Hedonic consumption. Experiential aspects of consumption. Sociogenesis of emotion. Recommended reading: Buck, R. (1988), Human Motivation And Emotion, 2nd edition, Chichester: Wiley. Burkitt, I. (1997), “Social Relationships and Emotions”, Sociology, 31 (1): 37-55. Desmond, J. (2003), Consuming Behaviour, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave, chapters 1, 6 & 10. Elias, N. (1987), “On Human Beings and their Emotions”, Theory, Culture and Society, 4: 339-61. Newton, T. (1998), “The sociogenesis of emotion: a historical sociology?”, in G. Bendelow and S. J. Williams, eds., Emotions in Social Life, Routledge. Solomon, M. et al (2002), Consumer Behaviour: a European Perspective, 2nd edition, Essex: Pearson Education, chapter 4. Stearns, P. (1995), “Emotion”, in R. Harre and P. Stearns, eds., Discursive Psychology in Practice, Sage. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  46. 46. Discussion texts: Arvidsson, A. (2000) “The Therapy of Consumption Motivation Research and the New Italian Housewife, 1958-62”, Journal of Material Culture 5(3): 251-274. Holbrook, M. and Hirschman, E. (1991), “The Experiential Aspects of Consumption” in Kassarjian and T. Robertson, eds., Perspectives in Consumer Behaviour, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall. Holyfield, L. (1999), “Manufacturing adventure: the buying and selling of emotions”, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 28(1): 3-32. Otnes, C et al (1997), “Toward an Understanding of Consumer Ambivalence” Journal of Consumer Research, 24(2): 80-93. Tudor, A. (1997), “Why Horror?...”, Cultural Studies, 11(3): 443-463. 5.5 Personality & the Self Freudian, Psychographic and Self-concept approaches to personality. Extended self and culture. The Ethic of Self. Lifestyles. The Body. Recommended reading: Belk, R. (1988), “Possessions and the Extended Self”, Journal of Consumer Research, Sept.: 139-168. Campbell, C. (1997), “When the meaning is not the message: a critique of the consumption as communication thesis”, in M. Nava et al (eds.), Buy this Book, Routledge. Desmond, J. (2003), Consuming Behaviour, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave, chapters 6, 7 & 8. Discussion texts: Bishop, R. (2001), “Old Dogs, New Tricks?…”, Journal of Communication Inquiry, 25(4): 334-352. Lawson, R. and Todd, S. (2002), “Consumer Lifestyles: a social stratification perspective”, Marketing Theory, 2(3): 295-307. Markula, P. (2001), “Beyond the Perfect Body…”, Journal of Sport & Social Issues, 25(2): 158-179. 5.6 Culture Sociological theories of culture. Cultural change. Subcultures. Self in Society. The cultural meaning of commodities. McDonaldization. Postmodernism. Consumer culture and the politics of need. Sustainable consumption and environmentalism. Recommended reading: Bauman, Z. (2001), “Consuming Life”, Journal of Consumer Culture, 1(1): 9-29. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  47. 47. Brown, S. (1993), “Postmodern Marketing: Principles, Practice, and Panaceas,” Irish Marketing Review, 6: 91-100. Campbell, C. (1987), The Romantic Ethic and the Spirit of Modern Consumerism, Basil Blackwell. Desmond, J. (2003), Consuming Behaviour, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave, chapters 2 & 4. Dolan, P. (2002), “The Sustainability of ‘Sustainable Consumption’”, Journal of Macromarketing, 20(2): 170-181. Featherstone, M. (1991), Consumer Culture and Postmodernism, Sage. Lury, C. (1996), Consumer Culture, Polity. Marx, K. (2000), “Estranged Labour”, in M. Lee, ed., The Consumer Society Reader, Blackwell. Marx, K. (2000), “The Fetishism of the Commodity and its Secret”, in M. Lee, ed., The Consumer Society Reader, Blackwell. McCracken, G. (1991), “Culture and Consumption”, in Kassarjian and T. Robertson, eds., Perspectives in Consumer Behaviour, 4th edition, Prentice- Hall. Ritzer, G. (2000), The McDonaldization of Society, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Pine Forge Press. Slater, D. (1997), “Consumer culture and the politics of need”, in M. Nava et al (eds.), Buy this Book, Routledge. Slater, D. (1997), Consumer Culture and Modernity, Cambridge: Polity Press. Discussion texts: Bennett, A. (1999), “Subcultures or Neo-tribes?..” Sociology, 33 (3): 599-617. Giulianotti, R. (1996), “‘All the Olympians: a thing never known again’?: reflections on Irish football culture and the 1994 World Cup Finals”, Irish Journal of Sociology, 6: 101-126. Kilbourne, W., McDonagh, P. and Prothero, A. (1997), “Sustainable Consumption and the Quality of Life: A Macromarketing Challenge to the Dominant Social Paradigm”, Journal of Macromarketing, 17(1): 4-24. Miller, D. (2001), “The Poverty of Morality”, Journal of Consumer Culture, 1(2): 225-243. Prothero, A. and Fitchett, J.A. (2000), Greening Capitalism: Opportunities for a Green Commodity”, Journal of Macromarketing, 20(1): 46-55. Wilk, R. (2001), “Consuming Morality”, Journal of Consumer Culture, 1(2): 245-260. 5.7 Social Class Class and culture. Class habitus and the field of consumption. The nature of social class in Ireland. Classification and measurement. Cross-cultural approaches to research. Recommended reading: marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  48. 48. Bourdieu, P. (1984), Distinction, Routledge. Coleman, R. (1991), “The Continuing Significance of Social Class to Marketing”, in Kassarjian and T. Robertson, eds., Perspectives in Consumer Behaviour, 4th edition, Prentice-Hall. Desmond, J. (2003), Consuming Behaviour, Hampshire and New York: Palgrave, chapter 6. Discussion texts: Bourdieu, P. (1991), “Sport and Social Class”, in M. Schudson and C. Mukerji, eds., Rethinking Popular Culture, University of California Press. Holt, D. (1998), “Does Cultural Capital Structure American Consumption?”, Journal of Consumer Research, vol.25 (June), pp.1-25. 5.8 Family & Gender Politics of domestic consumption - gender and family power relations. Consumer research and the family - the role of children. The Home - the private sphere and site of consumption. Gender and the meanings and functions of domestic objects and technology. Recommended reading: Pahl, Jan (1995), “Household spending, personal spending and the control of money in marriage”, in S. Jackson and S. Moores (eds.), The Politics of Domestic Consumption: Critical Readings, Prentice-Hall, pp.53-66. Murcott, A. (1995), “‘It’s a pleasure to cook for him’: food, mealtimes and gender...”, in S. Jackson and S. Moores (eds.), The Politics of Domestic Consumption: Critical Readings, Prentice- Hall, pp.89-99. Morley, D. (1995), “The gendered framework of family viewing”, in S. Jackson and S. Moores (eds.), The Politics of Domestic Consumption: Critical Readings, Prentice-Hall, pp.173-185. Vogler, C. (1998), “Money in the household: some underlying issues of power”, Sociological Review, 46(4), 687-713. Discussion texts: King, A. (1997), “The lads: masculinity and the new consumption of football”, Sociology, 31(2): 329-346. Philips, D. (2000), “Shopping for Men: The Single Woman Narrative”, Women: a cultural review, 11(3): 238-251. Silva, E. (2000), “The cook, the cooker and the gendering of the kitchen”, Sociological Review, 48(4): 612-628. Valentine, G. (1999), “Eating in: home, consumption and identity”, Sociological Review, 47(3): 491-524. 6.0 Learning Strategy marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  49. 49. The course will be delivered through weekly lectures and tutorials. The lectures will address the theoretical issues and debates involving particular concepts while the tutorials will address the discussion texts listed above. Students will be expected to have familiarized themselves with the relevant text prior to the tutorial to enable as much student participation as possible. 7.0 Assessment Strategy Assessment % Allocated Continuous Assessment 40% End of Year examination 60% 8.0 Reading List Essential Reading See Subject Matter Recommended Reading See Subject Matter Recommended Web Resources www.ingenta.com http://wos.heanet.ie/ http://www.indiana.edu/%7Ewanthro/consum.htm http://www.popcultures.com/ http://www.ucd.ie/~sai/ http://www.britsoc.org.uk/ http://www.asanet.org/ marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  50. 50. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: Three SUBJECT TITLE: Financial Analysis ECTS CREDITS: 5 1.0 Subject Area Financial Analysis has close links with subjects encountered earlier in the course such as Economics, Quantitative Methods and Financial Decision Making. The subject aims to equip the Retail & Services Management student with the requisite tools to analyse capital investment projects undertaken by the firm in a rigorous manner; to have a solid understanding of the procedure to be followed in preparing projected financial statements and to become familiar with the CAPM. The subject also deals with the substantive areas of cost of capital, mergers & acquisitions and dividend polity. 2.0 Relevance for the Student of Marketing Marketing students need to be fully cognisant of the most extensively used investment appraisal techniques in order to be able to determine the financial viability of a wide array of marketing projects, such as new product development or expansion into new geographic markets. Coupled with a solid framework for analysing investment proposals, the Marketing student also requires a basic understanding of how such investments will be funded and the impact of taking on a certain project on the firm as a whole, including its impact on the risk profile of the firm. 3.0 Aim of the Course The course aims to give the student a working knowledge of how the firm chooses between competing projects, how it finances the projects undertaken and how the outcome of these investment and financing decisions impacts on the firm’s valuation. 4.0 Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the course, the student will be 4.1 competent in the application of an array of investment appraisal techniques and understand the key issues involved in the capital budgeting process; 4.2 able to prepare projected financial statements and fully appreciate the importance of accurately forecasting cashflows 4.3 fully aware of the relationship between risk and reward in financial decision-making; 4.4 able to calculate WACC using the CAPM and dividend valuation models in both a domestic and international context; 4.5 aware of the plethora of issues surrounding M&A activity and will be competent in the use of earnings based and asset based methods of valuation; 4.6 appreciative of the importance of a consistent dividend policy. 5.0 Subject Matter 5.1 Investment Appraisal Techniques and Applications: In-depth examination of capital budgeting techniques including NPV, IRR, MIRR and Profitability Indices. Incorporate risk into investment appraisal – risk-adjusted discount rates and probability analysis. Incremental cashflow analysis, replacement decisions and capital rationing. Sensitivity analysis and scenario analysis. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  51. 51. 5.2 Financial Planning: Planning for the future. Preparing projected financial statements. Forecasting sales, costs and balance sheet items. Importance of projected cash flow statements. 5.3 The Cost of Capital: Familiarisation with the CAPM and the uses of the model in financial management. Operating gearing and financial gearing. Measurement of debt capacity. Cost of equity using the CAPM and dividend valuation models, cost of redeemable and irredeemable debt, tax shield on debt. Calculating WACC. Relevance of cost of capital for unlisted companies and public sector organisations. Estimating the international cost of capital using the CAPM. 5.4 Mergers and Acquisitions: Arguments for and against M&A activity. International M&A activity. Estimating the value of potential target companies – earnings based valuation methods and asset based valuation methods. Methods of financing M&A transactions (mini case study of eircom’s use of a rights issue to finance its takeover of Meteor in 2005). Defences against take-overs (mini case study of Marks & Spencers successful defence against a takeover bid from entrepreneur Philip Green in 2004) 5.5 Dividend Policy: Importance to shareholders of a consistent dividend policy. Practical influences on dividend policy. Dividends as signals of future prospects. Dividend irrelevance hypothesis. 6.0 Learning Strategy The key strands in the learning strategy are a series of lectures, which are supported by extensive material downloadable from the intranet site. Articles which are pertinent to the material being covered in the lecture series will also be available on the intranet site for students to peruse in their own time. 7.0 Assessment Strategy Assessment % Allocated Mid-term examination 20% Final examination 80% 8.0 Reading List Essential Reading The handbook comprising of lecture notes and a question bank provided at the start of the semester is essential reading. Recommended Reading Arnold, Glen (2002) Corporate Financial Management. Financial Times Pitman, 2nd Edition Arnold, Glen (2005) The Handbook of Corporate Finance, FT Prentice Hall, London Atrill, Peter (2003) Financial Management for Non-specialists. FT Prentice Hall, 3rd Edition. Recommended Web Resources http://dt341-3marketing.webexone.com www.ft.ie marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  52. 52. COURSE CODE: DT341 Degree in Marketing YEAR: 3 SUBJECT TITLE: Marketing Communications ECTS CREDITS: 5 1.0 Subject Area “Communications” is a topic of vital interest to everyone, whether in the fields of business, politics, art or indeed personal relationships. In the commercial environment, effective communications are a core competence on which the survival and growth of organisations depend. Marketing communications involves the legitimation of corporations, institutions and other organisations in commodity culture. 2.0 Relevance for the Student of Marketing The study of marketing communications provides a valuable opportunity to investigate the sign wars witnessed in contemporary society as consumer goods markets mature accompanied by advances in production and distribution techniques leading to brand parity. 3.0 Aim of the Course This course aims to introduce participants to the key components of marketing communications theory and how it is manifested in various media environments. 4.0 Learning Outcomes • To provide students with a thorough understanding of the theoretical foundations of marketing communications. • To explore in depth the development of advertising techniques, their management and evaluation. • To assess the role of branding within marketing communications. • To consider the discourse of advertising in contemporary society by considering such topics as advertising's unintended consequences and gender portrayal in advertising. • To examine the key marketing communication strategies of sales promotions, public relations, sponsorship and the newly emerging internet and interactive media environments. 5.0 Subject Matter The course is organised into thematic lectures, themes, which will typically last for 2 conventional lecture sessions but may last more than this and a series of class debates. Theme 1 Introduction to course, course assessment. Communications and its role in marketing strategy. Reading: Text Chapters 1 & 2 Nowak, G.J. and Phelps, J. (1994), “Conceptualizing the Integrated Marketing Communication’s Phenomenon: An Examination of its Impact on Advertising Practices and its Implications for Advertising Research” Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising, Vol 16, No. 1 (Spring ) pp. 49-66 Theme 2 Communications Theory: Relationships with marketing communications. marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10
  53. 53. Reading: Text Chapter 5 Schramm, W. (1955), “How Communication Works”, from The Process and Effects of Mass Communication, Urbana: University of Illinois, pp 3-26 Lawlor, K. (1995), “Advertising as Communication” (Chapter 2) Marketing Communications in Ireland Lannon, J & Cooper, P. (1983), “Humanistic Advertising: A Holistic Cultural Perspective”, International Journal of Advertising, Vol. 2, pp 195-213 Buttle, F (1995), “Marketing Communications Theory: What do the texts teach our students”, International Journal of Advertising, Vol 14, No. 4 pp 297-313 Theme 3 The Role of Advertising: Advertising Agencies, Source, Message and Channels. Reading: Text Chapters 3 & 6 Kwangmi, K. (1995), “Spreading the Net: The Consolidation Process of Large Transnational Advertising Agencies in the 1980s and early 1990s”, International Journal of Advertising, Vol. 14, pp 195-217 Meenaghan, T. and Patton, B. (1995), “Examining Client/Agency Relationships in an Irish Context” Marketing Communications in Ireland Theme 4 The Role of Advertising: Creative Strategies, Communications Objectives and Budget Setting. Reading: Text Chapters 7 & 8 Abdullah, I. and Donnelly, J.P. (1995), “Creative Strategy in Advertising” (Chapter 7) Marketing Communications in Ireland, Hirschman, Elizabeth C. (1991), “Point of View : Sacred , Secular and Mediating Consumption Imagery in Television Commercials”, Journal of Advertising Research, Vol, January, pp 38-43 Mitchell, L.A. (1993), “An examination of methods of setting Advertising Budgets: Practice and the Literature”, European Journal of Marketing, Vol 27, No. 5, pp 5-21 Theme 5 The Role of Advertising: Media Planning and Strategy. Reading: Text Chapters 10-13 O'Donoghue, A. and Harper, T. (1995), “Media Research in Ireland” (Chapter 9) Marketing Communications in Ireland Foster S. (2000), "The Evolution of the New Media Species", Admap, Sept., pp 22-25 McPartlin, P. (1995), “Media Strategy - Selecting and SchedulingMedia in Ireland” (Chapter 6) (Chapter 9) Marketing Communications in Ireland, Stewart, D.W. and Ward, S. (1994), “Media Effects on Advertising”, in Media Effects, Advances in Theory and Research, Jennings Bryand and Dolf Zillmann, eds. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates marketing-degree1275.doc-2005 04/30/10

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