Unit Guide

MSc International Business


International Strategy


Faculty of Business, computing
and information management
Unit Title:                   INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY


Unit Reference Number:        MCS-M-160


Level:                   ...
•    Provide and evaluate frameworks of analysis underpinning the MSc International Business
     dissertation


LEARNING ...
On completion of this Unit the student should be able to:

   •   Critically apply numeracy and data analysis skills to th...
THE PROGRAMME OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT
INTRODUCTION TO STUDYING THE UNIT

Theory and overviews will be present...
Dicken, P, Global Shift, ch's 1,2
Taggart & McDermot, ch.1, 4
Rugman & Hodgetts, ch 2 & 3
Segal Horn, S, ch’s 1 & 2


2. A...
4.       RESOURCES,                COMPETENCY                    AND           CORPORATE
         PERFORMANCE

     •   Re...
Seminar       Smartcard 2

Reading

John, ch 8
Stonehouse, G et al, ch6
Johnson & Scholes, Op. Cit., ch. 6, 7
McDonald & B...
Segal-Horn,S & Faulkner,D, 1999, ch 11,12
Barney, ch 13
Ietto-Gillies,G,(2002) Transnational Corporations: Fragmentation A...
Johnson & Scholes, ch 11


11       GLOBALISATION AND ANTI-GLOBALISATION
-    Home & host country effects of international...
Formation of seminars, each with three sub-groups, icebreaker getting to know one another

Week Two

Case study technique ...
Assessment criteria for the written case study report are:

•      Evidence of a well planned, organised and structured pi...
Wiley, 2nd edition


OPTIONAL MATERIALS

Bartlett C. and Ghoshal, S, (2002) Text, Cases & Readings in Cross-Border Managem...
CASE STUDY ANALYSIS
A. INTRODUCTION: WHAT ARE CASE STUDIES?

A case study is a problem solving/business decision-making si...
To develop analytical skills; the method helps to develop skills in multidisciplinary business
analysis which in turn act ...
d)     Identify the firm’s internal strengths and weaknesses to help analyse its strategic
       capabilities and compete...
(1.2, 1,3, etc) may be used but is not obligatory. Use plenty of white space, breaking up the text
with visual aids, diagr...
STEPS IN CASE STUDY ANALYSIS

                       Read Case




Internal Analysis                          Environmenta...
INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY

        JANUARY 2006 EXAMINATION




Answer THREE Questions

All questions carry equal marks

Answ...
Part A: Answer all parts of Question One:

(Each part contributes fifty percent of the marks to Question One)

Q1

     A....
NOTES
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  1. 1. Unit Guide MSc International Business International Strategy Faculty of Business, computing and information management
  2. 2. Unit Title: INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY Unit Reference Number: MCS-M-160 Level: M Credit Value: 15 CATS POINTS Subject Area: MARKETING AND STRATEGY Student Study Hours: 60 Hours Contact Time 90 Hours Student Self Managed Learning Pre-requisites: None Assessment Method: 70% Three Hour Part Seen Case Study Examination 30% Coursework individual assignment LSBU Unit Coordinator: Robin John ( johnra@lsbu.ac.uk) Course: MSc INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AIMS OF THE UNIT International Strategy seeks to analyse the strategies, policies and decision-making of international firms in the context of the changing international business environment. The Unit’s specific aims are for students to: • Develop an advanced understanding of the international strategic environment in which international business decisions are made, including the organisational and competitive challenges of the 21st Century. • Demonstrate an understanding of the different forms of international business activity, and the range of alternative theoretical frameworks for analysing international business decision making. • Analyse and critically evaluate the strategic management, planning and decision making processes in international firms. • Develop a critical understanding in relation to the strategic analysis process, the choice and evaluation of appropriate international business strategies. • Develop a critical awareness of key contemporary International Business issues
  3. 3. • Provide and evaluate frameworks of analysis underpinning the MSc International Business dissertation LEARNING OUTCOMES KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING By the end of this Unit the student should be able to: a) Critically evaluate strategic decision-making in multinational corporations (MNCs); b) Critically assess current issues and developments in international business c) Demonstrate detailed knowledge of strategic issues in a number of important international firms and industries d) Appreciate the benefits and costs of the impacts of international firms on host and home countries e) Demonstrate an ability to apply the methods of economic and strategic analysis to the study of the international firm INTELLECTUAL SKILLS On completion of this Unit the student should be able to: • Demonstrate information gathering, interpretation, and analytical/problem solving skills • Demonstrate capabilities in international strategic analysis and strategy formulation • Appreciate the factors determining the MNC’s capability, performance and success; • Demonstrate the development of critical understanding and analytical judgment of international strategy issues. PRACTICAL SKILLS On completion of this Unit the student should be able to: • Develop group and team working skills through the case study seminars and workshops • Develop the ability to engage in self-managed learning, including reading and study skills in preparation for class discussion, coursework and examination assessment • Demonstrate an ability to understand and critically evaluate alternative viewpoints and theories, weigh evidence and draw conclusions TRANSFERABLE SKILLS
  4. 4. On completion of this Unit the student should be able to: • Critically apply numeracy and data analysis skills to the analysis of financial, economic and marketing information in the case-studies. • Demonstrate communication, essay and report writing skills. • Develop information technology skills required through the use of electronic databases and the world wide web for corporate information and publisher based learner support materials.
  5. 5. THE PROGRAMME OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT INTRODUCTION TO STUDYING THE UNIT Theory and overviews will be presented in a series of formal lectures. These will be supported by a programme of seminars, including the use of videos, group work and exercises. Case studies have an important role to play within the overall teaching strategy. These will be selected to achieve wide sectional coverage of international industry and services including traditional, service, mature and technically advanced sectors e.g. international retailing, airlines, electronic card services, consumer electronics, automobiles, and computers. The seminar activities will be based around a mixture of case study and seminar questions. Each seminar group should be split into three teams or syndicates. Students will take turns in presenting on different questions. At this first stage of the MSc International Business, the presentations will be formative and diagnostic in developing presentation skills and will not be formally assessed. The students involved in the particular case study/ seminar question will produce an individual write up of their course work assignment of circa 2,500 words, to be submitted two weeks after the presentation. This will contribute 30% to the assessment of the unit. For the four larger case studies in the unit guide; Airlines industry, Smart card, Renault/Nissan, and Sony the first seminar week is a general discussion week, with the students assisting the presenting student in their group. The presentations take place in the following week’s seminar. Each presentation should last about 15 minutes followed by discussion. Presenting students should write up their own question and one other on the same case study in their report/essay. Self-managed learning: students are expected to spend an average of seven hours per week in self-managed learning to support the unit. Such learning includes case study preparation; all students are expected to have undertaken a preliminary reading of the case study before attending the first week of the cycle devoted to a specific case. Self-managed learning also includes week- by-week reading in one of the core strategy set texts, assignment preparation and writing, and examination revision. WEEKLY TEACHING AND LEARNING PROGRAMME 1. INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY • Introduction to the course: content and assessment • Definition, terminology and scope of international business and strategy • International business trends, why go international? • The international firm and its evolution Seminar Group formation; Icebreaker Reading* * NB - Italics indicate core reading. John et al, Introduction plus ch 2,3 Stonehouse, G et al, ch 1
  6. 6. Dicken, P, Global Shift, ch's 1,2 Taggart & McDermot, ch.1, 4 Rugman & Hodgetts, ch 2 & 3 Segal Horn, S, ch’s 1 & 2 2. ALTERNATIVE FOREIGN MARKET ENTRY AND DEVELOPMENT METHODS; THEORIES OF INTERNATIONALISATION • Theories and forms of international business; Export, Knowledge, Foreign Direct Investment • Neoclassical and push/pull theories of FDI • International Product Life Cycle Model • Dunning & Eclectic Theories of FDI Seminar Mini Case Study & Discussion Questions Reading Dicken, P ch 7 John, R, ch 5 Segal Horn, S, ch’s 1 & 2 Stonehouse, ch 7 3. THE INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENT & COMPETITION IN GLOBAL INDUSTRIES • The International Strategic Environment: PESTEL analysis • Technology & Innovation: industry change - mature and emerging industries • Yip and Industry globalisation potential – globalization and localization drivers • International competition, five forces and competitive rivalry – global and local competitors Seminar Airlines industry case study 1 Reading John, R, ch 3,7 Johnson, G. & Scholes, K. Exploring Corporate Strategy ch 1,4 Barney, ch 3 & 4 Stonehouse, G et al, ch5 Deresky, H, ch 2 Taggart & McDermott, ch 4 Yip, G, Total Global Strategy Dicken, P, ch 4
  7. 7. 4. RESOURCES, COMPETENCY AND CORPORATE PERFORMANCE • Resources and capability analysis • Evaluating international firm performance • Core competency and the value chain Seminar Airlines industry case study 2 Reading John, ch 8 Prahalad, C & Hamel, G, The core competence of the corporation, in Segal-Horn, S., The Strategy Reader, Open University & Blackwell, 1998 Stonehouse, G et al, ch3 Taggart & McDermott, ch 4 Johnson & Scholes, Op. Cit., ch. 6, 7 Barney, ch 5 Grant, part 2 Hill & Jones, ch 4, 8 5. STRATEGY FORMULATION AND EVALUATION; COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE & SUSTAINABILITY • Generic strategies and competitive advantage • Imitability & the VRIO framework • Evaluating firm’s strengths & weaknesses; balanced score card • Strategy evaluation Seminar Smartcard 1 Reading John, ch 8 Stonehouse, G et al, ch3 Barney, ch 6 & 7 Johnson & Scholes, Op. Cit., ch. 6, 7 Deresky, H, ch 7 Grant, part 2 Hill, ch 19 6. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY • Strategic options and strategic choice • Development direction: growth, integration, diversification, outsourcing, divestment • International generic strategy • Globalisation/ localisation pressures and competitive strategies • Concepts and critique of transnational strategy • Internationalisation of Services
  8. 8. Seminar Smartcard 2 Reading John, ch 8 Stonehouse, G et al, ch6 Johnson & Scholes, Op. Cit., ch. 6, 7 McDonald & Burton, ch 7 Bartlett, C & Ghoshal, S, Managing Across Borders: the Transnational Solution, 1989 Dicken, P., Global Shift, ch. 6 Lasserre, P, ch 1 Segal-Horn, S., The Internationalisation of Service Firms, in The Strategy Reader, Open University & Blackwell, 1998 7. STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION: INTERNATIONAL ACQUISITIONS & MERGERS • Methods of Strategy implementation • Definition, trends and growth of international acquisitions and mergers • Causes of increased A & M activity • Problems and effectiveness of A & M Seminar Renault/ Nissan 1 Reading: John, ch.9 Stonehouse, G, ch14 McDonald, F & Burton,F,ch 9 Barney, ch 14 Dicken, P. ch 7 Johnson & Scholes, Op. Cit., ch.8 Lasserre, ch 5,6,7 8. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION, THE DELTA MODEL AND VALUE NETWORKED ORGANISATIONS • Definition and classification of strategic alliances and joint ventures • Reasons for their rapid growth and significance • Delta model & the Network organization • Collaboration Problems and effectiveness Seminar Renault/ Nissan 2 Reading: John, R, ch.9 Stonehouse, G, ch 7,14
  9. 9. Segal-Horn,S & Faulkner,D, 1999, ch 11,12 Barney, ch 13 Ietto-Gillies,G,(2002) Transnational Corporations: Fragmentation Amidst Integration, Ch’s 3 & 4 Deresky, H, ch 8 Dicken, P, ch 5 & 7 Mellahi, ch 7 Lasserre, ch 4 9. INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE • Evolution in international organisational structures • Organisational structure determinants • Product/Geographic/Functional & Matrix structures • Transnational network structures Seminar Sony 1 Reading: John, ch. 10 Taggart & McDermot, ch 9, 10 Stonehouse, G et al, ch13 Segal-Horn, S., The Dynamics of International Strategy, part 2 Deresky, H, ch 9 Humes, S, Managing the Multinational, 1993 ch 3,4,5 Bartlett, C & Ghoshal, S, Managing Across Borders: the Transnational Solution, 1989 Barlett, C. & Ghoshal, Global Strategy & Beyond the M Form, in 10 STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION: CULTURE AND STRATEGIC CHANGE • Strategy Implementation: organizational culture & Cultural change • Cultural web & international strategy • Managing cultural & strategic change • Strategic leadership, management style Seminar: Sony 2 Reading: John, ch.11 Stonehouse, G, ch14 Paul, H., Creating a Global Mindset, Thunderbird International Business Review, March-April 2000 Rugman,A & Hodgetts,R, ch 5,12 McDonald, F & Burton,F,ch 7 Deresky, H, ch 4, part 4 Segal-Horn,S & Faulkner,D, 1999, ch 5 Lasserre,P, ch11 & 12
  10. 10. Johnson & Scholes, ch 11 11 GLOBALISATION AND ANTI-GLOBALISATION - Home & host country effects of internationalisation - International Business Ethics - The response of nation states from control to collaboration - Anti-globalisation movements - TNC’s and globalisation – a new agenda for global responsibility? Seminar: Mini cases Reading: Dicken, P ch 15,17,18 Lasserre,P, ch 15 Mellahi, ch 4 Crane & Matten Lee & Carter, ch 17 Deresky, H, ch 3 Ietto-Gillies,G,(2002) Transnational Corporations: Fragmentation Amidst Integration, Ch’s 1,6,9,10 Hirst, P & Thompson,G,(1999) Globalisation in Question, ch’s 1&4 Milberg, W, (1996) Globalisation and its Limits, in Kozul-Wright, R & Rowthorne, R, (eds) Transnational Corporations and the Global Economy 12 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT • Review of the Course • The Future of International Business • Case Study Exam Technique Seminar Practice Examination Questions Reading Dicken, P ch 17,18 Stonehouse, ch 15 Rugman & Hodgetts, ch 20 Lasserre, P, ch 15,16 Seminar Programme I have outlined below the seminar programme and indicated how many questions I hope to generate on the case studies for students to present. Week One
  11. 11. Formation of seminars, each with three sub-groups, icebreaker getting to know one another Week Two Case study technique and mini case study Week Three Airlines industry; initial discussion and familiarization with the case study Week Four Presentation of three questions on airline industry case Week Five Smartcard case study; initial discussion and familiarization with the case study Week Six Presentation of three questions on Smartcard case study Week Seven Renault/Nissan case study; initial discussion and familiarization with the case study Week Eight Renault/Nissan case study; presentation of three questions on the case study Week Nine Sony case study; initial discussion and familiarization with the case study Week Ten Sony case study; presentation of three questions on the case study Week Eleven Presentation of two questions on host country effects and anti-globalisation critique Week Twelve Practice Examination Questions ASSESSMENT PROGRAMME 30% of the final mark for the Unit will comprise in course assessment in the form of one written up case study/ seminar assignment. Students involved in that particular case study will write up ONE 2,500 word case study report covering TWO of the questions, to be submitted two weeks after the presentation.
  12. 12. Assessment criteria for the written case study report are: • Evidence of a well planned, organised and structured piece of work including clear conclusions and recommendations. • Content and coherence: relevance of the content to the questions set; have the case study questions been squarely and clearly answered? To what extent does the content develop coherent themes of argument in answering the questions? • Analytical standard: emphasis on analysis rather than repeating descriptive details from the case study; application of theoretical concepts and techniques including financial analysis, to analyse the case. • Presentation and referencing: use of case study report or essay format as appropriate, use of diagrams and figures, quality of academic writing and use of English. Sources must be correctly referenced, and there needs to be a systematic bibliography at the end. Be aware that plagiarism, in the form of copying from unattributed sources or from other students, will result in penalties including failure. Please refer the Academic Assistant CD ROM EXAMINATION At the end of the Unit will be a three hour examination. This will contribute 70% to the overall unit assessment. Students are required to answer three questions. The examination will comprise a Part A based on a new seen case study, with a choice of one question from two, and an essay based Part B, with a choice of two out of five questions on international strategy topics covered during the course. The case study will be distributed at least two weeks before the examination. Please refer pages 21/22 for sample past examination paper. THRESHOLD PASS REQUIREMENT: In order to pass this M level unit, students are required to achieve an overall mark of at least 50%, and a minimum mark of 40% in each element of assessment. LEARNER SUPPORT MATERIALS CORE MATERIALS Barney, J.B, (2006) Gaining & Sustaining Competitive Advantage, Pearson, 3rd Edition Dicken P, (2006) Global Shift: Transforming the World Economy, Paul Chapman, 5th Edition John R., Cox H, Grimwade N, Ietto-Gillies, G., (1997), Global Business Strategy, International Thomson Press Johnson G and Scholes K, (2005) Exploring Corporate Strategy, Text, Pearson, 7th edition Lasserre, P, Global Strategic Management,(2003) Palgrave McMillan Stonehouse, G, Hamill, J, Campbell, D, Purdie, T, (2003) Global and Transnational Business,
  13. 13. Wiley, 2nd edition OPTIONAL MATERIALS Bartlett C. and Ghoshal, S, (2002) Text, Cases & Readings in Cross-Border Management, McGraw Hill Crane & Matten, (2005) Business Ethics, Oxford University Press de Wit, R & Meyer, R, (2002) Strategy: Process, Content, Context, International Thomson Press Deresky, H, (2003) International Management: Managing Across Borders and Cultures, Prentice Hall Hax, Arnoldo & Dean L. Wilde, (2001) The Delta Project: Discovering New Sources of Profitability, New York, Palgrave Hill, C, (2000) International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace McGraw Hill, Hirst P., & Thompson G, (1999) Globalisation in Question, Polity, 2nd edition Ietto-Gillies, G, (2002) Transnational Corporations: Fragmentation Amidst Integration, Leontiades, J, (2001) Managing the Global Enterprise, Pearson Lynch, R, (2005) Corporate Strategy, Pearson Mellahi,K, George Frynas,J & Finlay,P, (2005) Global Strategic Management, Oxford University Press Rugman, A & Hodgetts, R, (2003) International Business; A Strategic Management Approach, Pearson Education Segal-Horn, S. & Faulkner, D, (1999) The Dynamics of International Strategy, International Thomson Press SELF-MANAGED LEARNING & WEBSITES Self-managed learning; The Academic Assistant CD ROM is important in assisting academic and writing skills development. Students are encouraged to keep abreast of current developments through journal and electronic media. Among relevant journals are The Economist, Harvard Business Review, Long Range Planning, European Management Journal, California Management Review, Journal of International Business Studies, Strategic Management Journal. Students are encouraged to access support materials through SBU’s BlackBoard website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/bb/ (See separate handout). Also corporate websites, electronic information sources such as European Business ASAP, (http://www.bized.ac.uk), the European Commission (http://www.cec.org.uk) and publishers’ websites for example Pearson’s (http://www.booksites.net) to follow up texts such as Johnson & Scholes or Richard Lynch. International Thomson is (http://www.thomsonlearning.co.uk).
  14. 14. CASE STUDY ANALYSIS A. INTRODUCTION: WHAT ARE CASE STUDIES? A case study is a problem solving/business decision-making simulation. It simulates a real world business situation in the classroom. This Course, in common with many programmes in the field of business and management education, uses case study analysis extensively as a teaching and learning method, and as a mechanism for in-course and final assessment. Hill and Jones (1998) explain: “A case study presents an account of what happened to a business or industry over a number of years. It chronicles the events that managers had to deal with, such as changes in the competitive environment, and charts the managers response, which usually involved changing the business or corporate-level strategy.” Case studies are more than simple practical exercises; Geoff Easton (1993) for example writes; "An exercise provides the material for a student to learn to apply a particular concept, technique or principle. A case is used to help students learn a broad range of skills. An exercise has a solution and one way of reaching that solution. A case has many solutions and many alternative pathways to reach them.” Case studies are of varying lengths - from half side mini-cases to 40 or 50 side “Harvard blockbusters” with financial appendices and supporting documents. The method originated in 1920 at the Harvard Business School when the Dean, Professor Wallace Donham, used a donation of $5,000 to gather case material for teaching use (Osigweh, 1989). Today, as well as written cases, there are video and multi-media case studies. In most case study method, you are not normally expected to do additional research and information gathering on the company and industry involved. Instead the stance is one of applying theory and analysis to a given set of information. However, there are alternative approaches; for example giving the student an old case study with the task being to research and gather information to up-date the company situation. Different teachers and students adopt a variety of approaches to case analysis and there is no one best way to analyse a case study. Recognising this, these notes do not purport to suggest there is a single correct approach, rather they seek to set out one approach, and provide a set of guidelines for students undertaking case analysis for the first time. B. LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND ADVANTAGES OF CASE STUDY METHOD Case study method, as a problem solving/decision simulation technique, seeks: To simulate the complexity and messiness of real world business situations and managerial decisions, in the class room To illustrate/ apply the theory and content of Strategic Management
  15. 15. To develop analytical skills; the method helps to develop skills in multidisciplinary business analysis which in turn act as an important integrating device in terms of the course constituents. To develop creative problem solving; the stages of problem identification, analysis, and the generation of alternative solutions involve a significant degree of creativity. Team working; most applications help further develop the participant’s group work and team working skills. Communication Skills; whether involving an oral presentation or a written report, case analysis helps develop key communication skills. C. STAGES IN CASE ANALYSIS Below we break case study analysis into five identifiable stages. All five stages may not always be used; eg early exercises may simply involve the first two case analysis stages. 1. Read and understand the case study Familiarisation with the case is likely to involve an initial "skimming" reading followed by multiple, detailed re-readings. These should be active rather than passive; for example setting up and knocking down some initial hypotheses. Ask questions; what is the case about? What is the story? The purpose is to identify key issues and themes from the mass of detail making up the case. According to Colin Talbot (1991), one technique, from Buzan (1982) which can be applied to reading case studies, is called S.P.I.R. standing for Survey, Preview, In-view, Review. Survey means having a broad look at the case study by flicking through the pages. How long is it? What diagrams and financial data does it contain? What period of time does it cover, including what is the end date? Preview means dipping into the case and getting an overview of what’s going on. One method is to read the first sentence in every paragraph, as this is frequently a key sentence. Alternatively skim read - reading anything that grabs your interest. In-view involves an in-depth read through of the whole case, carrying out some initial analysis; using coloured hi lighters to identify key points e.g. for the SWOT (NB highlighters lose their purpose with excessive use!) Review involves standing back from the detail and checking that you have clearly identified the main issues and haven’t got lost in detail. 2. Diagnosis/ Analysis of the Problems and Issues Involved a) Make detailed notes identifying what are the primary problem(s), issues and themes involved. b) Prepare analyses of the data, restructuring it using percentages, graphs, etc. in order to identify the main trends for sales, market share, costs, and profitability; extrapolating wherever possible. c) Identify areas of ambiguity, contradictions, imperfect information and potential red herrings in the case material.
  16. 16. d) Identify the firm’s internal strengths and weaknesses to help analyse its strategic capabilities and competencies. e) Analyse the company's position by resource or function; for example human resources, financial, physical, intangible. f) Identify key success factors and important factors of change in the firm's external environment (e.g. technology, competitive intensity, etc) g) Analyse existing corporate and business level strategies h) Identify relevant theories, concepts and tools which could be applied to the case, for example portfolio models or theories of organisational structure or theories of leadership. 3. Development and Evaluation of Alternative Solutions It is frequently possible to generate half a dozen alternative solutions/strategies in a particular case; even the most farfetched should be considered; the case study team needs to avoid mind set and tunnel vision. NB the status quo, "Doing nothing" is always one possible solution. What are the likely implications, impacts, consequences of the various possibilities? The advantages and disadvantages of the various options need to be evaluated and an order of preference established. 4. Identification of Preferred Strategy and Recommendations The recommendations need not only to clearly state the proposed strategy, but also to consider practical issues relating to implementation. For example the proposed timetable involved, costings, budgets and sources of finance, revised responsibilities, task allocations, changes to management and organisational structure. It is useful to adopt a functional approach examining the consequences for finance, marketing, personnel and operations. The recommendations should develop naturally from the internal and external analysis and be consistent with the facts. 5. Communication of the Results This may take the form of an individual or group oral presentation, or a written case analysis. In oral presentations allow sufficient time for preparing the presentation including any transparencies used. In oral presentations the amount of detail your audience can absorb is limited. In both oral and written case analysis you need to assume your audience is familiar with the case; the emphasis needs to be on analysis; not on a descriptive regurgitation of the facts in the case. In both oral and written case analysis use diagrams to summarise/apply relevant theoretical perspectives, charts and exhibits on the financial analysis In written case analysis, a modified report-style structure should be used. It should be report style in having clear paragraphing, with headings and sub-headings. A paragraph numbering system
  17. 17. (1.2, 1,3, etc) may be used but is not obligatory. Use plenty of white space, breaking up the text with visual aids, diagrams, graphs, etc. Unlike an essay, it does not need to have a bibliography, as the contents are primarily based on the analysis of a given case study. An introduction section is important in setting out and clarifying the specific questions involved and to orientate the reader to the overall approach/ themes of your analysis. Conclusions and recommendations sections are essential. If you need further assistance on report writing and structure, please refer to the Study Skills Survival Guide available from the Core Skills Unit. Case Study References Buzan, T, Use Your Head, BBC, 1982 Easton, G, Learning from Case Studies, Prentice Hall, 1993 Hill, C & Jones, G, Strategic Management, Houghton Mifflin, 1998 Osigeh, C, Using the Case Approach in Management Development Journal of Management Development, 1989 Talbot, C, Case Studies for Beginners, South Bank University, 1991
  18. 18. STEPS IN CASE STUDY ANALYSIS Read Case Internal Analysis Environmental Analysis Current Strategies & Position Identify Determine Issues Theory/Models Generate Alternative Strategies Solution Choice Communicate Findings SAMPLE EXAMINATION PAPER MSc INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
  19. 19. INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY JANUARY 2006 EXAMINATION Answer THREE Questions All questions carry equal marks Answer all parts of Question One in Part A on the seen case study Answer TWO Questions from Part B Students may take their annotated copy of the case study into the examination, but no other materials.
  20. 20. Part A: Answer all parts of Question One: (Each part contributes fifty percent of the marks to Question One) Q1 A. With the use of Porter’s five forces model, analyse the competitive structure of the world car industry. B. Outline and evaluate the key strategic issues in the world car industry, and discuss the competitive strategies pursued by the car makers. Part B: Answer TWO Questions from the choice below: Q2 With reference to one international strategy case study of your choice (not the examination case study) identify the key internal and external factors contributing to the firm’s performance or performance problems. Q3 Outline the host country effects of internationalisation. Use stakeholder analysis to identify the primary stakeholders of the international firm and indicate how host country effects could be managed. Q4 “Organising and strategising are now recognised as truly complementary activities even to the point where the form of organising may be synonymous with the strategy of the firm” (multidomestic, global, transnational) Pettigrew et al (2001) Discuss this statement in relation to the evolving strategy and structure of the international firm (Continued over page) Q5 Outline and evaluate the concepts of the paradigm and cultural web. Why might managing cultural change be particularly difficult in international firms? Q6. Outline and critically evaluate the 4 Globalisation Drivers identified in Yips’ model of industry globalisation potential. Provide an industry example to illustrate their application.
  21. 21. NOTES

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