Fundamentals of Business Analysis Course Objectives

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  • 1. Fundamentals of Business Analysis Course Objectives By the end of the course the Business Analyst will be able to: • Integrate into any project or team environment with an understanding of their role and responsibilities • Work with business users to agree and document project scope • Work with business users to gather and document high-level and detailed requirements • Break down complex business scenarios or problems into process and data models • Apply end-to-end thinking to complex business and system problems to ensure ‘right first time’ documentation and solutions • Work with business users and delivery teams to develop optimal solutions to agreed requirements • Plan and manage analysis activity including quality and sign-off reviews • Assess and manage change requests • Confidently present findings to their peer group and project team Attendees of this course may go on to attend our ISEB top-up course in order to achieve their ISEB Business Analysis diploma. Course Structure Module 1 - Introduction to the BA Role Module 2 - Defining a Project Module 3 - Interviewing and Fact Finding Module 4 - Requirements Definition Module 5 - Process Modelling Module 6 - Data Modelling Module 7 - Ensuring Requirements Quality Module 8 - Managing Delivery Module 9 - Review (Day 5 Optional) Module 10 – Requirements Engineering On-site training clients may replace the Process Modelling and Data Modelling modules with a UML based module which describes the key UML techniques relevant to business analysis. This includes Class Diagrams, Use Cases, Activity Diagrams and Dynamic Modelling. Module 1 - Introduction to the Business Analyst Role The role of the Business Analyst and how it has evolved over the past three decades. We look at where the Business Analyst fits within an organisation and how the role and responsibilities may differ. Module 2 – Defining a Project Examines the important steps in defining a project. Covers the importance of understanding and defining objectives, how to define scope, production of a business case, identifying stakeholders. How projects are broken down into phases and what deliverables are produced from those phases. Module 3 - Interviewing and Fact Finding The user perception of IT and projects. How to interview different types of user and how to capture and assimilate information. How to use workshops effectively for requirements gathering. 21/08/2007 Page 1 of 5
  • 2. Three interview role-plays are performed to place delegates in real-life situations with three different types of user. Module 4 - Requirements Definition What are requirements, why they need to be defined and different techniques for documenting requirements. Types of requirement, including Functional and Non-Functional requirements. The importance of defining requirements at a high and low level of detail. Examines and discusses the difference between requirements and solutions. Why end-to-end thinking must be applied. Examines the complexities of modern business systems and processes. Module 5 –Process Modelling Any computerised or non-computerised solution is comprised of processes and data. This module covers the reasons why (and when) to use process models, how to draw business process diagrams, and the different techniques available including practical use of the industry standard process modelling technique - BPMN. Process models express Business requirements and Business rules as they relate to the processes: Equipped with a process model, a Business Analyst can map the requirements expressed to a documentation of the current solution (if any) and resolve any gaps. Module 6 - Data Modelling Any computerised or non-computerised solution is comprised processes and data. A process has a set of data that is logically required by the process in order to be able to run. There is a rigorous method for rd modeling data requirements resulting in a 3 Normal Form data model. Data models express Business requirements and Business rules as they relate to the data that is logically required in order to run a process and/or provide operational and management reports. Equipped with a data model, a Business Analyst can map the requirements expressed to a current solution database schema (if any and with IT assistance) and resolve any gaps. Module 7 – Ensuring Requirements Quality Looks at the development of Use Cases and scenarios. What can go wrong during requirements analysis and how to prevent it. How to ensure a quality product. Module 8 - Managing Delivery Looks at the role of the BA beyond a project’s initial requirements definition phase. Revisits the detailed analysis phase and why it is so important. Examines how the BA should work with business users and delivery teams to ensure a robust and cost effective solution is delivered. Module 9 - Review Revisits the key learning points. Examines why projects can go wrong and what the Business Analyst can do to prevent it. Case Study A team-based case study is used throughout covering all the course modules dealing with: • User conflicts • System integration issues • Changes to requirements/scope • Business process change • Organisational change 21/08/2007 Page 2 of 5
  • 3. Delegates are encouraged to make short informal presentations at the end of each case study exercise to build their confidence. 21/08/2007 Page 3 of 5
  • 4. OPTIONAL EXTRA DAY Certificate in Requirements Engineering Introduction Having done the Fundamentals course, delegates are in an excellent position to ‘top up’ their knowledge to a sufficient level to sit the ISEB Certificate in Requirements Engineering. This certificate is concerned with approach to requirements definition. Its focus is on using a systematic approach to eliciting, analysing, validating, documenting and managing requirements. Candidates are required to be able to understand and explain the Requirements Engineering approach and to adopt relevant techniques at all stages of this approach. The syllabus requires that the candidate should be able to describe the following aspects of the approach: • The structure (for example, phases and connections between phases). • The activities (for example, the tasks and possible techniques). Candidates are required to understand a range of Requirements Elicitation techniques. For each technique, the candidate should be able to • Describe the technique. • Interpret and develop any documentation produced when using the technique. Candidates are also required to appreciate the importance of modelling techniques in Requirements Analysis. Two modelling techniques are prescribed in the syllabus: candidates must be able to interpret a data model and are required to be able to develop a process/function model. Recommendations for potential candidates There are no specific pre-requisites for entry to the examination, however candidates should be suitably prepared and possess the appropriate skills and knowledge to fulfil the objectives above. It is the view of ISEB that for full coverage to be achieved, training courses leading to the Certificate should normally run 28 hours. The examination will consist of one one-hour written examination (open-book), with 15 minutes reading time. Candidates who are awarded a pass for the examination are awarded the ISEB Certificate in Requirements Engineering. 21/08/2007 Page 4 of 5
  • 5. Objectives Holders of the ISEB BSD Certificate in Requirements Engineering should be able to: • Describe the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders in the requirements engineering process. • Demonstrate the application of a range requirements elicitation techniques. • Explain the use of requirements elicitation techniques and the relevance of the techniques to given situations. • Document and prioritise user requirements for an information system. • Identify problems with requirements and explain how requirements documentation may be improved • Create a process/function model of requirements for an information system • Interpret a model of the data requirements for an information system. • Explain the importance of linking project objectives and requirements to the Business Case. • Describe the principles of Requirements Management and explain the importance of managing requirements. • Describe the use of CASE tools to support Requirements Engineering. • Explain the principles of Requirements Validation and define an approach to validating requirements. READING LIST Strongly recommended: Business Analysis – Debra Paul and Donald Yeates Published by: The British Computer Society ISBN 1-902505-70-0 Price: £20.00 from BCS Candidates taking ISEB exams should familiarise with the following Relevant Chapters/sections: Chapter 9 – Requirements Engineering Chapter 10 – Modelling the IT system Optional: Requirements Engineering – Processes and Techniques by Gerald Kotonya and Ian Somerville Published by: John Wiley and Sons ISBN 0-471-97208-8 Price: £34.99 (Amazon) also available second-hand Candidates taking ISEB exams should familiarise with the following: Relevant Chapters/sections: Chapters 1 – 6 (up to and including section 6.2) Chapter 8 21/08/2007 Page 5 of 5