Women at work February 2013
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Women at work February 2013

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Half day open training event held in Toronto.

Half day open training event held in Toronto.

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Women at work February 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Women in the workplace of 2013 by Toronto Training and HR February 2013
  • 2. 3-4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR 5-6 A business case for gender diversityContents 7-8 9-10 Competencies Motivators 11-12 Different beliefs 13-14 Foundational strengths 15-16 Going from good to great 17-18 What should senior management focus on 19-20 Scaling up 21-22 Embedding transformation 23-25 Gender diversity success 26-27 Being a powerful champion 28-29 Advancing women 30-32 A Polish perspective 33-34 Becoming a board member 35-36 Advice for aspiring Presidents 37-38 Numbers, numbers, numbers… 39-40 The double bind 41-43 Organizational barriers and inhibitors 44-47 Individual barriers and inhibitors 48-49 Work still to do… 50-51 Conclusion and questions
  • 3. Introduction Page 3
  • 4. Introduction to Toronto Training and HRToronto Training and HR is a specialist training andhuman resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden10 years in banking10 years in training and human resourcesFreelance practitioner since 2006The core services provided by Toronto Training and HRare: Training event design Training event delivery Reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers Page 4
  • 5. A business case for gender diversity Page 5
  • 6. A business case for gender diversity • Overcome skills shortages • Respond to increasingly diverse markets • Increase creativity and innovation • Increase employee engagement • Reduce attrition of talent • Mitigate legal and reputational costs Page 6
  • 7. Competencies Page 7
  • 8. Competencies • Mid-level leader • Business unit leader • Senior executive Page 8
  • 9. Motivators Page 9
  • 10. Motivators • Responsibility for others and the unit • Influence on organization direction • Performance-based culture • Personal accomplishment • Friendly workplace • Stimulating, challenging work Page 10
  • 11. Different beliefs Page 11
  • 12. Different beliefs • Women just ARE pettier than men • Women in positions of power are just Queen Bees • You can’t have it all! • Women face similar obstacles/opportunities on their journeys up the corporate ladder • To focus on our differences is divisive Page 12
  • 13. Foundational strengths Page 13
  • 14. Foundational strengths • Robust work ethic • Persistence in obtaining feedback • Results orientation • Team leadership • Resilience Page 14
  • 15. Going from good to great Page 15
  • 16. Going from good to great • Hands-on leadership, starting at the top • Diversity leadership with clout • Pervasive sponsorship • Robust talent management • Strong accountability supported by data Page 16
  • 17. What should seniormanagement focus on Page 17
  • 18. What should senior management focus on • Declare gender diversity a business imperative • Build awareness of the business case • Introduce performance dialogues • Develop a strong data set and inventory of practices and policies Page 18
  • 19. Scaling up Page 19
  • 20. Scaling up • Drive the management focus down to the front line • Focus on helping women gain broad line experience early on • Recognize champions meaningfully Page 20
  • 21. Embedding transformation Page 21
  • 22. Embedding transformation • Role model at the top • Invest in leadership development • Hardwire the shift Page 22
  • 23. Gender diversity success Page 23
  • 24. Gender diversity success 1 of 2 MEASURES • A starting position that reflects the talent • Better odds of promotion • More women at the top • Women in the line Page 24
  • 25. Gender diversity success 2 of 2 MEASURES • ‘Fat’ funnels • Steady pipes Page 25
  • 26. Being a powerful champion Page 26
  • 27. Being a powerful champion • Stop colluding! • Invest • Develop a learning partner • Make it personal Page 27
  • 28. Advancing women Page 28
  • 29. Advancing women • Societal level • Organizational level • Individual level Page 29
  • 30. A Polish perspective Page 30
  • 31. A Polish perspective 1 of 2 • Quotas are not the answer • The glass ceiling is not the issue it once was • Confidence is critical • Women have several clear advantages over men • Women have a more balanced attitude to risk • Work and family-an age old dilemma • Do women need to be better than men to get to the top Page 31
  • 32. A Polish perspective 2 of 2 FINDINGS • Quotas are not the right solution • Hesitation; women can be the own worst enemies • The importance of networking…and team building • Being better than men • The glass ceiling • Cultural impact • The future Page 32
  • 33. Becoming a board member Page 33
  • 34. Becoming a board member • International experience • Market leader experience • Exposure to social and digital media • Courage and good judgement • Financial acumen • Experience of operational leadership Page 34
  • 35. Advice for aspiring Presidents Page 35
  • 36. Advice for aspiring Presidents • Attitude • Professional knowledge • Self-promotion • Private life Page 36
  • 37. Numbers, numbers, numbers… Page 37
  • 38. Numbers, numbers, numbers… • Barriers to career advancement • Career management • Flexible work schedules • Slowed careers • Work-life balance • Spouses with full-time jobs • Career growth • Career advice • Career path • Levels of dissatisfaction Page 38
  • 39. The double bind Page 39
  • 40. The double bind • A contradiction for women in positions of power • He and she • Masculine style and feminine style • The double bind as distraction Page 40
  • 41. Organizational barriers and inhibitors Page 41
  • 42. Organizational barriers and inhibitors 1 of 2 • Poor succession planning policies and practices • No clear employer brand proposition • Lack of transparency/biased promotion and talent processes • Narrow definition of effective leadership • Fixed thinking on what is required • No targets for female representation and diversity
  • 43. Organizational barriers and inhibitors 2 of 2 ADDRESSING THESE • A broad strategy • Leadership and sponsorship • Analysis and assessment • HR policies and processes • Development programs Page 43
  • 44. Individual barriers and inhibitors Page 44
  • 45. Individual barriers and inhibitors 1 of 3 • Individual leadership and management capability • Transparency in talent management and progression • Work/life challenges Page 45
  • 46. Individual barriers and inhibitors 2 of 3 WHAT WOMEN CAN DO • Recognize and play to your strengths as leaders • Build a personal brand • Consistently deliver • Face challenges and difficulties • Think laterally about international experience and mobility Page 46
  • 47. Individual barriers and inhibitors 3 of 3 WHAT WOMEN CAN DO • Find an appropriate mentor/s • Network with influential people • Signal willingness to take on high profile and stretching opportunities • Project an aura of confidence • Get free from ‘double burden’ syndrome Page 47
  • 48. Work still to do… Page 48
  • 49. Work still to do… • Gender pay gap • Societal stereotypes • Implicit gender biases Page 49
  • 50. Conclusion and questions Page 50
  • 51. Conclusion and questionsSummaryVideosQuestions Page 51