Stressed out; what can be done March 2011
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Stressed out; what can be done March 2011

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Half day interactive open workshop in Toronto on stress.

Half day interactive open workshop in Toronto on stress.

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Stressed out; what can be done March 2011 Stressed out; what can be done March 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Stressed out; what can be done?
    by Toronto Training and HR
    March 2011
  • Contents
    3-4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR
    5-6 Definitions
    7-8 Drill A
    9-10 Post-traumatic growth
    11-12 Master resilience training (MRT)
    13-20 Excessive job stress
    21-23 Strategies of stress management
    24-25 Measures
    26-28 work-life balance and stress
    29-30 Coping with stress
    30-42 Questions to ask
    31-32 Duty of employers
    33-35 Actions to reduce job stress
    36-41 Eliminating stress
    42-43 Prostitutes and stress
    44-46 Police stressors
    47-48 Drill B
    49-50 Case study A
    51-52 Case study B
    53-54 Conclusion and questions
  • Page 3
    Introduction
  • Page 4
    Introduction to Toronto Training and HR
    Toronto Training and HRis a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden
    10 years in banking
    10 years in training and human resources
    Freelance practitioner since 2006
    The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are:
    • Training course design
    • Training course delivery
    - Reducing costs
    • Saving time
    • Improving employee engagement & morale
    • Services for job seekers
  • Page 5
    Definition
  • Page 6
    Definition
    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
    The response people may have when presented with work demands and pressures that are not matched to their knowledge and abilities and which challenge their ability to cope
  • Page 7
    Drill A
  • Page 8
    Drill A
  • Page 9
    Post-traumatic growth
  • Page 10
    Post-traumatic growth
    Understanding the response to trauma
    Reducing anxiety
    Engaging in constructive self-disclosure
    Creating a narrative in which the trauma is seen as a fork in the road that enhances the appreciation of paradox
    Articulating life principles
  • Page 11
    Master resilience training (MRT)
  • Page 12
    Master resilience training (MRT)
    Building mental toughness
    Building signature strengths
    Building strong relationships
  • Page 13
    Excessive job stress
  • Page 14
    Excessive job stress 1 of 7
    SYMPTOMS
    Fatigue
    Insomnia
    High blood pressure
    Headaches
    Ulcers
    Heartburn
    Inability to concentrate or relax
    Changes in appetite
    Waning sexual interest
  • Page 15
    Excessive job stress 2 of 7
    CAUSES
    Unpredictability of employment
    Work overload
    Lack of flexibility
    Personality conflict
    Too much responsibility
    Changes in technology
    Lack of training
  • Page 16
    Excessive job stress 3 of 7
    CONSEQUENCES
    Mental
    Physical
    Social
    Economic
  • Page 17
    Excessive job stress 4 of 7
    MAIN FACTORS OF STRESS
    Too fast working process or disappointment with not being promoted
    Too much or too little work
    Displacement, change of work environment, change of co-workers
    Change in the nature of work or managing style
    Unclear relationships with the superiors, insufficient space for own decision-making
    Irregular or too long working hours, monotony of work
    Dangerous work (feeling of risk), violence at the workplace
  • Page 18
    Excessive job stress 5 of 7
    FIVE BASIC REACTIONS
    1. Sharing grievances with others, without taking direct steps to change the situation
    2. Working longer and harder to reduce the overload
    3. Switching to an engrossing recreational activity, so they can return refreshed and do more work in a shorter time
    4. Withdrawing physically from the situation by quitting, seeking another job or reducing the time and energy spent at work
    5. Analyzingthe situation, revising strategies and looking for ways to change things
  • Page 19
    Excessive job stress 6 of 7
    REDUCING STRESS ON THE JOB
    Take charge of your situation
    Be realistic about what you can change
    Take one task at a time
    Be honest with colleagues
    Let your employer help
    Slow down
    Recognize danger signs of job stress
  • Page 20
    Excessive job stress 7 of 7
    REDUCING STRESS ON THE JOB
    Take care of your physical health
    Learn to relax
    Do not neglect your private life
    Carefully evaluate your job and its relationship to your goals
  • Page 21
    Strategies of stress management
  • Page 22
    Strategies of stress management 1 of 2
    Underevaluation
    Denial of guilt
    Diversion
    Alternate satisfaction
    Control over situation
    Control over reactions
    Positive self-instructions
    Need for social support
  • Page 23
    Strategies of stress management 2 of 2
    Avoidance
    Escape tendency
    Perseverance
    Acquiescence
    Self-blame
  • Page 24
    Measures
  • Page 25
    Measures
    Personal and workstation characteristics
    Hours worked
    Workaholism components
    Workload
    Work intensity
    Organizational values
    Work engagement
  • Page 26
    Work-life balance and stress
  • Page 27
    Work-life balance and stress 1 of 2
    Manageable workload 48%
    Choose the work hours 46%
    Choose the work days 44%
    Compressed work week 43%
    Management understands 40%
    Short term leave 40%
  • Page 28
    Work-life balance and stress 2 of 2
    Part-time with benefits 39%
    Spread out work week 34%
    Long term leave 33%
    More work from home 32%
    Share job with someone 28%
    Less commuting time 28%
    Less job-related travel 24%
    Daycare close by 20%
  • Page 29
    Coping with stress
  • Page 30
    Coping with stress
    Just say no
    Remove any non-assertive beliefs
    Practice being more assertive with others by scaling
    Preparing to refuse or disagree
    Communicate your request assertively
    Keep it positive and non-challenging
  • Page 31
    Duty of employers
  • Page 32
    Duty of employers
    Dismissal from employment, Wallace v. United Grain Growers Ltd. (1997)
    The modification of terms to a collective agreement, Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto v. Canadian Union of Public Employees (1990)
    Harassment and discrimination, Janzen and Govereauv. Platy Enterprises Ltd. (1989)
    Intentional or negligent infliction of nervous shock,
    Steeves v. R. (1995)
  • Page 33
    Actions to reduce job stress
  • Page 34
    Actions to reduce job stress 1 of 2
    Lower work load
    A better supervisor/management
    Better pay/benefits/vacation
    Nothing will work/quitting
    More flexibility in hours worked
    Fewer hours/more time off
    Better communication with management
    No changes needed
    Better relationships with co-workers/less conflict
    Less demanding customers/clients
  • Page 35
    Actions to reduce job stress 2 of 2
    More job security
    More resources/budget
    More time to complete work/longer deadlines
    More control/decision-making
    Co-workers work harder and more competently
    Improved/more training
    Clearer priorities set by employer
    Less work load
    Better working conditions
    Less red tape, rules, bureaucracy
  • Page 36
    Eliminating stress
  • Page 37
    Eliminating stress 1 of 5
    STAGE ONE
    Recognize the cause of stress
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
  • Page 38
    Eliminating stress 2 of 5
    STAGE TWO
    Catch yourself when you are thinking negative thoughts and replace them with positive ones
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
  • Page 39
    Eliminating stress 3 of 5
    STAGE THREE
    Take better care of yourself
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
  • Page 40
    Eliminating stress 4 of 5
    STAGE FOUR
    Calming rituals
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
  • Page 41
    Eliminating stress 5 of 5
    STAGE FIVE
    Remember what is good in your life
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
    Recognize the cause of your stress. There are a few instances where you feel tremendously stressed – which of these triggers can be eliminated from your life?
  • Page 42
    Prostitutes and stress
  • Page 43
    Prostitutes and stress
    Stressors
    Moderators
    Strains
  • Page 44
    Police stressors
  • Page 45
    Police stressors 1 of 2
    The feeling that different rules apply to different people
    Feeling like you always have to prove yourself to the organization
    Inconsistent leadership style
    Dealing with the court system
    Bureaucratic red tape
    Perceived pressure to volunteer free time
    Staff shortages
    Excessive administrative duties
    Dealing with co-workers
    Leaders over-emphasize the negatives
  • Page 46
    Police stressors 2 of 2
    Lack of resources
    Dealing with supervisors
    Unequal sharing of work responsibilities
    Constant changes to policy/legislation
    The need to be accountable for doing your job
    Too much computer work
    Inadequate equipment
    Internal investigations
    If sick or injured your co-workers seem to look down on you
    Lack of training on new equipment
  • Page 47
    Drill B
  • Page 48
    Drill B
  • Page 49
    Case study A
  • Page 50
    Case study A
  • Page 51
    Case study B
  • Page 52
    Case study B
  • Page 53
    Conclusion & Questions
  • Page 54
    Conclusion
    Summary
    Questions