Social Networking June 2010

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One-day interactive workshop designed for HR professionals in Yorkshire. The event tookplace in a computer suite where all delegates had access to an individual PC.

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Social Networking June 2010

  1. 1. Social media for HR professionals-getting it right<br />by Fluid <br />January 2010<br />
  2. 2. Page 2<br />Contents<br />3-4 Introduction to Fluid<br />5-6 Statistics<br />7-10 Terminology<br />11-13 Creating a blog<br />12-13 Engagement and performance<br />14-15 Exercise A<br />16-17 Making a start<br />18-19 Real-life examples<br />20-22 Corporate social networking<br />23-26 Legal considerations when vetting candidates<br />27-28 Exercise B<br />29-30 Benefits of Web 2.0 technologies<br />31-32 The new fault lines<br />33-34 Barriers to adoption of Web 2.0 technologies<br />35-36 Reasons to recruit via social media<br />37-44 Specific sites<br />45-46 Case studies<br />47-48 Exercise C<br />49-50 Conclusion and questions<br />
  3. 3. Page 3<br />Introduction<br />
  4. 4. Page 4<br />Introduction to Fluid<br />Fluid Consulting Limited (Fluid) is a specialist human resources consultancy headed by Tim Holden MCIPD <br />10 years in banking<br />10 years in Human Resources consultancy<br />Fluid trading since 2006<br />The core services provided by Fluid are:<br /><ul><li>Retention
  5. 5. Selection</li></ul>- Attraction<br />- Remuneration & Reward <br />- Outplacement<br />- Training & HR consultancy<br />
  6. 6. Page 5<br />Statistics<br />
  7. 7. Page 6<br />Statistics<br /><ul><li>20% of organisations use social networking sites to research applicants
  8. 8. 68% use search engines to check candidates
  9. 9. 70% of London employers block the use of Facebook at work
  10. 10. 51% of recruiters think social networking poses a challenge to traditional recruitment
  11. 11. 60% of employers would check a candidate’s blog
  12. 12. 65% of university students are Facebook users</li></li></ul><li>Page 7<br />Terminology<br />
  13. 13. Page 8<br />Terminology 1 of 3<br /><ul><li>Aggregation
  14. 14. Avatar
  15. 15. Blog
  16. 16. Browser
  17. 17. Digital native
  18. 18. Discussion forum
  19. 19. Enterprise 2.0
  20. 20. Firewall</li></li></ul><li>Page 9<br />Terminology 2 of 3<br /><ul><li>Hit
  21. 21. Information aggregation
  22. 22. Instant messaging
  23. 23. Mashup
  24. 24. Media-sharing
  25. 25. Metadata
  26. 26. Net or V Generation
  27. 27. Open source</li></li></ul><li>Page 10<br />Terminology 3 of 3<br /><ul><li>Podcasting
  28. 28. RSS feed
  29. 29. Social bookmarking
  30. 30. Social networking
  31. 31. Streaming media or video streaming
  32. 32. Tagging
  33. 33. Virtual learning environment
  34. 34. Web feed
  35. 35. Wiki</li></li></ul><li>Page 11<br />Creating a blog<br />
  36. 36. Page 12<br />Creating a blog 1 of 2<br /><ul><li>Think about what you want to achieve by creating a blog-what is your end goal? With whom do you need to build relationships?
  37. 37. Think about who would be best placed to blog-who has expertise in their field and can talk with authority?
  38. 38. Talk about issues in your industry that will be relevant to your candidates and employees
  39. 39. Split up the blogging role to help monitor what is going on
  40. 40. Think about relevant keywords</li></li></ul><li>Page 13<br />Creating a blog 2 of 2<br /><ul><li>BUILDING A SAFE BLOGGING CULTURE
  41. 41. What is a blog anyway?
  42. 42. What can blogging at work help build?
  43. 43. Web of danger
  44. 44. Safe blogging advice</li></li></ul><li>Page 14<br />Exercise A<br />
  45. 45. Page 15<br />Exercise A<br />
  46. 46. Page 16<br />Making a start<br />
  47. 47. Page 17<br />Making a start<br /><ul><li>Sign up
  48. 48. Introduce yourself
  49. 49. Dress for the occasion
  50. 50. Make an offer
  51. 51. Find people to network with
  52. 52. Start a conversation</li></li></ul><li>Page 18<br />Real-life examples<br />
  53. 53. Page 19<br />Real-life examples<br /><ul><li>Using wikis to collaborate and share knowledge-Pfizer and NHS
  54. 54. Using blogs to communicate, learn & listen-BBC
  55. 55. Data aggregation to share knowledge and learning-Cega
  56. 56. Supporting employees with new tools for collaboration-KPMG, Allen & Overy, Duke Corporate Education
  57. 57. Reaching out to employees-Westminster City Council
  58. 58. Resonating with V Generation’s preferred forms of communication and learning-T-Mobile
  59. 59. More effective talking to prospective employees-Royal Opera House</li></li></ul><li>Page 20<br />Corporate social networking <br />
  60. 60. Page 21<br />Corporate social networking 1 of 2<br /><ul><li>Pitch your social networking idea to management as a learning network rather than a social one. Make it as much about learning as interaction, bringing employees who not normally work together into contact.
  61. 61. Use a social network to support a particular business initiative
  62. 62. Include a tutor function (as a guideline on best practice) in the social network
  63. 63. Cherry-pick the best possible talent for a project from across the business, rather than allow a particular business faction to dominate.</li></li></ul><li>Page 22<br />Corporate social networking 2 of 2<br /><ul><li>Create spaces such as virtual desks, similar to a chat room, where you can drop an email to another team member of a specific project to go and pick something off their virtual electronic desk. This encourages employees to rely less on their normal email function and instead log into their virtual desk, ensuring that they focus their attention on the initiative and their project team.
  64. 64. Management can also log-in to check the status of a project, helping them manage their time and involvement more effectively.</li></li></ul><li>Page 23<br />Legal considerations when vetting candidates<br />
  65. 65. Page 24<br />Legal considerations when vetting candidates 1 of 3<br /><ul><li>EMPLOYMENT LAW RISKS
  66. 66. Processing personal data fairly under the Data Protection Act 1998, and breaching guidelines in the DPA code
  67. 67. Claims for discrimination on any unlawful grounds
  68. 68. Breaching trust and confidence</li></li></ul><li>Page 25<br />Legal considerations when vetting candidates 2 of 3<br /><ul><li>EMPLOYERS CAN MAKE THIS PRACTICE SAFER IF:
  69. 69. Tell candidates website checking may be part of the vetting process
  70. 70. Separate the web-vetting from recruitment decision-making
  71. 71. Give applicants a chance to explain discrepancies in CVs and applications
  72. 72. Ask if the job justifies such in-depth vetting, and whether the information could be gathered in another way</li></li></ul><li>Page 26<br />Legal considerations when vetting candidates 3 of 3<br /><ul><li>DISCRIMINATION
  73. 73. ‘Cyber-vetting’ candidates could lead employers into expensive discrimination claims unless they take simple precautions
  74. 74. Employers should avoid printing out ‘netreps’ in case this provides a discrimination claimant with a paper trail of evidence
  75. 75. References and interviews can verify or overturn employers’ perceptions of candidates gleaned from social networking websites
  76. 76. Candidates should clean up their web profiles if they don’t want to put off prospective employers</li></li></ul><li>Page 27<br />Exercise B<br />
  77. 77. Page 28<br />Exercise B<br />
  78. 78. Page 29<br />Benefits of Web 2.0 technologies<br />
  79. 79. Page 30<br />Benefits of Web 2.0 technologies<br /><ul><li>Recruitment
  80. 80. Encouraging greater collaboration
  81. 81. Give employers and customers greater voice
  82. 82. Saving time and money on travel and accommodation
  83. 83. Help knowledge-sharing and management</li></li></ul><li>Page 31<br />The new fault lines<br />
  84. 84. Page 32<br />The new fault lines<br /><ul><li>Transparency
  85. 85. Competitive collaboration
  86. 86. Whose network is it anyway?
  87. 87. The new network capitalists</li></li></ul><li>Page 33<br />Barriers to adoption of Web 2.0 technologies<br />
  88. 88. Page 34<br />Barriers to adoption of Web 2.0 technologies<br /><ul><li>Risk of public exposure, damage to customer and employer brands plus a general loss of control
  89. 89. Lack of understanding and expertise
  90. 90. Lack of date and uncertainties about the costs and benefits of various media
  91. 91. Limitations placed on Web 2.0 by IT departments that didn’t want to damage the integrity of their systems</li></li></ul><li>Page 35<br />Reasons to recruit via social media<br />
  92. 92. Page 36<br />Reasons to recruit via social media<br /><ul><li>Return on time
  93. 93. Free job advertising
  94. 94. Extend the conversation
  95. 95. The human touch
  96. 96. A new network
  97. 97. Spread the word
  98. 98. Return on investment</li></li></ul><li>Page 37<br />Specific sites<br />
  99. 99. Page 38<br />Specific sites (1 of 7)<br />
  100. 100. Page 39<br />Specific sites (2 of 7)<br />
  101. 101. Page 40<br />Specific sites (3 of 7)<br />
  102. 102. Page 41<br />Specific sites (4 of 7)<br />
  103. 103. Page 42<br />Specific sites (5 of 7)<br />
  104. 104. Page 43<br />Specific sites (6 of 7)<br />
  105. 105. Page 44<br />Specific sites (7 of 7)<br />
  106. 106. Page 45<br />Case studies<br />
  107. 107. Page 46<br />Case studies<br />
  108. 108. Page 47<br />Exercise C<br />
  109. 109. Page 48<br />Exercise C<br />
  110. 110. Page 49<br />Conclusion & Questions<br />
  111. 111. Page 50<br />Conclusion<br />Summary<br />Questions<br />

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