Social media March 2013

219 views
169 views

Published on

Half day open training event held in Toronto.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
219
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Social media March 2013

  1. 1. Getting the best from social media by Toronto Training and HR March 2013
  2. 2. 3-4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR 5-6 What is social media?Contents 7-9 Employer concerns 10-11 Inappropriate private behaviour 12-14 Policy considerations 15-17 Obtaining passwords 18-19 Jones v Tsige 20-22 Employment law risk areas 23-24 Sexual harassment 25-29 Creating and implementing a strategy 30-34 Questions for HR 35-37 Benefits for HR 38-40 Initiatives for HR 41-42 HR or PR? 43-45 Recruitment matters 46-48 Steps for HR to take 49-50 Conclusion and questions Page 2
  3. 3. Introduction Page 3
  4. 4. Introduction to Toronto Training and HRToronto Training and HR is a specialist training andhuman resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden10 years in banking10 years in training and human resourcesFreelance practitioner since 2006The core services provided by Toronto Training and HRare: Training event design Training event delivery Reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers Page 4
  5. 5. What is social media? Page 5
  6. 6. What is social media? • Definition • Statistics • Characteristics • Key collaboration tools • Social media pioneers • Lesser known sites Page 6
  7. 7. Employer concerns Page 7
  8. 8. Employer concerns 1 of 2 • Using information from social media in hiring employees • Preventing harassing activities by employees through electronic means • Disciplining employees who use social media to discuss the terms and conditions of employment or who post derogatory information about the business, its owners or managers Page 8
  9. 9. Employer concerns 2 of 2 • Protecting the company’s trade secrets and confidential information both during and after the employment relationship Page 9
  10. 10. Inappropriate private behaviour Page 10
  11. 11. Inappropriate private behaviour • Potential readership ? • Was the communication private ? • Compatibility - with employer’s purpose / reputation or employee’s role • Criticisms of the employer, their employees, suppliers or customers • Recent cases Page 11
  12. 12. Policy considerations Page 12
  13. 13. Policy considerations 1 of 2 • What kind of usage is allowed for work? • What kind of private use is not permissible? • Use of the business name/association? • How will/may the employer monitor use of social media platforms? • Clearly communicate consequences of breaches • What should it contain? Page 13
  14. 14. Policy considerations 2 of 2 • Developing a policy • Implementing a policy • Monitoring provisions Page 14
  15. 15. Obtaining passwords Page 15
  16. 16. Obtaining passwords 1 of 2 UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES • Accessing a candidates personal social media profile may lead to uncontrolled secondary use of personal data, such as data regarding a candidates friends and family • Once the employer is in the possession of the data, the employer becomes responsible for that data and assumes liability for the privacy issues regarding the data Page 16
  17. 17. Obtaining passwords 2 of 2 UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES (CONT.) • An employer may lose out on qualified candidates who are deterred from applying for a position because of the employers practice • Possible loss of reputation of the employer • Costs of legal liability should a claim arise regarding the use of the information gathered during the social media background check Page 17
  18. 18. Jones v Tsige Page 18
  19. 19. Jones v Tsige INTRUSION UPON SECLUSION • One who intentionally intrudes, physically or otherwise, upon the seclusion of another or his or her private affairs or concerns, is subject to liability to the other for invasion of his or her privacy, if the invasion would be highly offensive to a reasonable person Page 19
  20. 20. Employment law risk areas Page 20
  21. 21. Employment law risk areas 1 of 2 • Misconduct • Defamation • Brand or reputational damage • Breach of confidentiality • Public controversy • Human rights • Bullying • Harassment • Discrimination Page 21
  22. 22. Employment law risk areas 2 of 2 • Productivity • Performance • Health & safety Page 22
  23. 23. Sexual harassment Page 23
  24. 24. Sexual harassment • Always ask for evidence • Talk to both parties • Look for patterns in the alleged harasser • Make sure your sexual harassment policy includes information regarding personal emails and social media accounts Page 24
  25. 25. Creating andimplementing a strategy Page 25
  26. 26. Creating and implementing a strategy 1 of 4 • What are our goals for social media? • What audiences are we attempting to reach via social media? • What resources can we commit to the implementation of a social media strategy? • Who can take the lead on implementation of social media strategy? Page 26
  27. 27. Creating and implementing a strategy 2 of 4 • Who is engaging in social media? • What are they saying? • Where are the conversations taking place? • When are the conversations taking place? • Why are the conversations taking place? Page 27
  28. 28. Creating and implementing a strategy 3 of 4 POINTS TO REMEMBER • Diversify • Stay up-to-date with current technology • Regularly monitor progress • Measurable ROIs Page 28
  29. 29. Creating and implementing a strategy 4 of 4 IMPLEMENTATION • Watching and learning • Develop a clear strategy • Get executive buy-in • Set the necessary policies and procedures • Monitoring the conversation • Evaluating the impact of your social media plan • Regularly review tools and have an evolving plan Page 29
  30. 30. Questions for HR Page 30
  31. 31. Questions for HR 1 of 4 • What happens when your boss sends you a friend request on Facebook? Are you mandated to accept it? • What if you choose to ignore your boss’ invite? How do you deal with any repercussions you sense? • What do you do when you notice that your peers or subordinates are bad- mouthing you in Facebook? Page 31
  32. 32. Questions for HR 2 of 4 • What happens if your boss friends your colleague but does not accept your invite? • What do you do when you find a colleague at work and friend on Facebook posts something against your co-worker or organization or boss? • How should you react / respond to tweet about your organization, if at all? Page 32
  33. 33. Questions for HR 3 of 4 • How should you react to discovering that a colleague at workplace and a friend is also part of a group that is detrimental to the company? • How do you react to a colleague (linked to you) on LinkedIn uses the Answers function to help "strangers" professionally with expert advice? Page 33
  34. 34. Questions for HR 4 of 4 • Is it OK for you to "friend" employees of competing companies, in a public forum? Do I need to declare this to HR? • Is it ethical for HR to Google you before hiring you and then making decisions based on your affiliations (or the lack of it) to hire (or not to hire)? Page 34
  35. 35. Benefits for HR Page 35
  36. 36. Benefits for HR 1 of 2 • A recruiting tool • A communication strategy tool • A corporate communications/employee engagement tool • A performance management tool • A rewards and recognition tool • A learning & development tool • A promotion and/or internal mobility tool Page 36
  37. 37. Benefits for HR 2 of 2 • Improve the organization’s reputation or employer brand • Play a key role in the reputation or brand • Resources for the HR professional • Listen, learn and modify • Gain more fans • Investigate prospective candidates and business partners Page 37
  38. 38. Initiatives for HR Page 38
  39. 39. Initiatives for HR 1 of 2 • Tweet your jobs • Engage with candidates on LinkedIn and Twitter • Find then connect with HR resources on Twitter • Use a blog • Create podcasts for employees • Post a YouTube video on what it is like working at your organization Page 39
  40. 40. Initiatives for HR 2 of 2 • Reward employees who share positive messages using social platforms • Create a LinkedIn Alumni group • Focus on causes or issues you feel are important Page 40
  41. 41. HR or PR? Page 41
  42. 42. HR or PR? • Don’t fire employees via e-mail • Don’t use a social network to talk negatively about a previous employer • Hire professionals where professional expertise is needed • Focus on brand reputation and customer loyalty • Never use social media to deal with sensitive matters or customer complaints Page 42
  43. 43. Recruitment matters Page 43
  44. 44. Recruitment matters 1 of 2 • Be careful with Facebook screening • Don’t ask for passwords • Change your medium based on the candidate • Know before you tell • Use online tools to gauge marketing and social media job seekers • Have a “Recently filled positions” area of your website Page 44
  45. 45. Recruitment matters 2 of 2 • Be careful with recommendations • Don’t forget about the smaller sites • Keep an eye on the organization’s reputation • Don’t believe everything you see • Act fast to preserve evidence • Keep thorough records Page 45
  46. 46. Steps for HR to take Page 46
  47. 47. Steps for HR to take 1 of 2 • Review each process in the HR domain in your organization to assess the current state • Understand your organization’s HR strategy, as well as challenges to define the opportunity • Complete a holistic review of your organization’s social media presence, governance and policies Page 47
  48. 48. Steps for HR to take 2 of 2 • Understand best and emerging practices • Develop a strategy and implementation roadmap to incorporate what has been learnt • Create process to monitor and evolve the strategy Page 48
  49. 49. Conclusion and questions Page 49
  50. 50. Conclusion and questionsSummaryVideosQuestions Page 50

×