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Minimizing bullying and harassment
by Toronto Training and HR
September 2013
CONTENTS
5-6 Definitions
7-8 What is not bullying?
9-11 Examples of bullying and harassment
12-14 What do mistreated emplo...
Page 3
Introduction
Page 4
Introduction to Toronto Training
and HR
Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and
human resources consul...
Page 5
Definitions
Definitions
• Bullying
• Harassment
• First degree, second degree
and third degree
Page 6
Page 7
What is not bullying?
What is not bullying?
• Having high work standards for
everyone
• Having high expectations for
everyone
• Enforcing deadli...
Page 9
Examples of bullying and
harassment
Examples of bullying and
harassment 1 of 2
• Unwanted physical contact
• Unwelcome remarks about a
person’s age, dress, ap...
Examples of bullying and
harassment 2 of 2
• Coercion for sexual favours
• Pressure to participate in
political/religious ...
Page 12
What do mistreated
employees do?
What do mistreated employees do?
1 of 2
• Are more likely to quit jobs or
take sick time or “mental
health days”
• Have lo...
What do mistreated employees do?
2 of 2
• Become withdrawn
• Turn to mood altering
substances
• Suffer post-traumatic stre...
Page 15
Comparing good
supervision to bullying
Comparing good supervision to
bullying 1 of 3
GOOD SUPERVISION
• Objective
• Constructive
• Focused on assisting
employees...
Comparing good supervision to
bullying 2 of 3
IF INCIDENTS DO OCCUR
• Respond promptly
• Investigate all allegations
• Do ...
Comparing good supervision to
bullying 3 of 3
BULLYING
• Relying on rumours
• Providing only negative feedback
• Having fa...
Page 19
Supervisor self-evaluation
Supervisor self-evaluation 1 of 2
DO YOU ENGAGE IN THESE
BEHAVIOURS?
• Public criticism of performance
• Blaming without j...
Supervisor self-evaluation 2 of 2
DO YOU ENGAGE IN THESE
BEHAVIOURS? (CONT.)
• Applying separate sets of rules
or standard...
Page 22
Better practices
Better practices
• Better communication
• Better motivation
• Better discipline
Page 23
Page 24
How do bullies get away
with it?
How do bullies get away with it?
• The organization is complicit or
clueless
• The organization or its
managers are fearfu...
Page 26
Bullying in reverse
Bullying in reverse
• Power by position
• Power through group dynamic
or collective behaviour
• Power by workplace regulat...
Page 28
Preventative action
Preventative action
• Develop a policy
• Affirmatively raise the subject
• Express strong disapproval of
bullying
• Develo...
Page 30
Training
Training
• Legal
• Communicative
• Disciplinary
• Cultural
Page 31
Page 32
Remedial action
Remedial action
• Investigate promptly and
thoroughly
• Take immediate and
appropriate corrective action
• Take steps calc...
Page 34
Dealing with a workplace
bully
Dealing with a workplace bully
• Keep your cool
• If you are threatened, walk
away
• Tell the bully to stop treating
you d...
Page 36
Investigations
Investigations 1 of 3
WHAT SHOULD AN INVESTIGATION
INCLUDE?
• A prompt, thorough and impartial
response
• Taking evidence ...
Investigations 2 of 3
AREAS THAT CAN TAINT
HARASSMENT INVESTIGATIONS
• Rushing to judgement before the
investigation is do...
Investigations 3 of 3
AREAS THAT CAN TAINT
HARASSMENT INVESTIGATIONS
(CONT.)
• Not interviewing third parties
• Asking lea...
Page 40
What should employees
do?
What should employees do?
• Be made aware - through
onboarding, training and other
processes - about their rights
and pers...
Page 42
Anti-harassment policies
Anti-harassment policies 1 of 3
• Make clear that harassment is
strictly prohibited
• Define harassment broadly
• Provide ...
Anti-harassment policies 2 of 3
• Permit reporting through a range
of channels including any
manager, HR representative or...
Anti-harassment policies 3 of 3
• Provide that the employer will
investigate and take appropriate
preventative and correct...
Page 46
Drill
Page 47
Drill
Page 48
Shah v Xerox Canada
Page 49
Conclusion and questions
Page 50
Conclusion and questions
Summary
Videos
Questions
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Minimizing bullying and harassment September 2013

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Half day open training event held in Toronto, Ontario

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Transcript of "Minimizing bullying and harassment September 2013"

  1. 1. Minimizing bullying and harassment by Toronto Training and HR September 2013
  2. 2. CONTENTS 5-6 Definitions 7-8 What is not bullying? 9-11 Examples of bullying and harassment 12-14 What do mistreated employees do? 15-18 Comparing good supervision to bullying 19-21 Supervisor self-evaluation 22-23 Better practices 24-25 How do bullies get away with it? 26-27 Bullying in reverse 28-29 Preventative action 30-31 Training 32-33 Remedial action 34-35 Dealing with a workplace bully 36-39 Investigations 40-41 What should employees do? 42-45 Anti-harassment policies 46-47 Drill 48 Case study 49-50 Conclusion and questions Page 2
  3. 3. Page 3 Introduction
  4. 4. Page 4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden 10 years in banking 10 years in training and human resources Freelance practitioner since 2006 The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are: Training event design Training event delivery Reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers
  5. 5. Page 5 Definitions
  6. 6. Definitions • Bullying • Harassment • First degree, second degree and third degree Page 6
  7. 7. Page 7 What is not bullying?
  8. 8. What is not bullying? • Having high work standards for everyone • Having high expectations for everyone • Enforcing deadline requirements for everyone • Keeping work and workers on time, for everyone • Tracking attendance for everyone • Enforcing the rules for everyone Page 8
  9. 9. Page 9 Examples of bullying and harassment
  10. 10. Examples of bullying and harassment 1 of 2 • Unwanted physical contact • Unwelcome remarks about a person’s age, dress, appearance, race or marital status, jokes at personal expense, offensive language, gossip, slander, sectarian songs and letters • Posters, graffiti, obscene gestures, flags, bunting and emblems • Isolation or non-cooperation and exclusion from social activities Page 10
  11. 11. Examples of bullying and harassment 2 of 2 • Coercion for sexual favours • Pressure to participate in political/religious groups • Personal intrusion from pestering, spying and stalking • Failure to safeguard confidential information • Shouting and bawling • Persistent unwarranted criticism • Setting impossible deadlines • Personal insults Page 11
  12. 12. Page 12 What do mistreated employees do?
  13. 13. What do mistreated employees do? 1 of 2 • Are more likely to quit jobs or take sick time or “mental health days” • Have lower levels of job satisfaction • Suffer reduced sense of wellbeing • Suffer job related stress, anxiety, depression, headaches, exhaustion and poor concentration Page 13
  14. 14. What do mistreated employees do? 2 of 2 • Become withdrawn • Turn to mood altering substances • Suffer post-traumatic stress disorders Page 14
  15. 15. Page 15 Comparing good supervision to bullying
  16. 16. Comparing good supervision to bullying 1 of 3 GOOD SUPERVISION • Objective • Constructive • Focused on assisting employees • Conduct motivated by legitimate work concerns Page 16
  17. 17. Comparing good supervision to bullying 2 of 3 IF INCIDENTS DO OCCUR • Respond promptly • Investigate all allegations • Do not require the employees to fix the problem themselves • Adopt a zero tolerance stand Page 17
  18. 18. Comparing good supervision to bullying 3 of 3 BULLYING • Relying on rumours • Providing only negative feedback • Having favourites • Making things so tough that the employee quits • “My way or the highway” Page 18
  19. 19. Page 19 Supervisor self-evaluation
  20. 20. Supervisor self-evaluation 1 of 2 DO YOU ENGAGE IN THESE BEHAVIOURS? • Public criticism of performance • Blaming without justification • Assigning menial tasks below skill levels • Excluding or isolating • Excessive unwarranted monitoring of performance, behaviour or breaks • Allowing co-worker bullying to persist Page 20
  21. 21. Supervisor self-evaluation 2 of 2 DO YOU ENGAGE IN THESE BEHAVIOURS? (CONT.) • Applying separate sets of rules or standards or constantly changing them • Setting impossible or unnecessary deadlines • Withholding information • Setting an employee up to fail • Blocking advancement • Tampering with belongings Page 21
  22. 22. Page 22 Better practices
  23. 23. Better practices • Better communication • Better motivation • Better discipline Page 23
  24. 24. Page 24 How do bullies get away with it?
  25. 25. How do bullies get away with it? • The organization is complicit or clueless • The organization or its managers are fearful • They have a sponsor or protector • Targets don’t complain • Institutional rewards support bullying Page 25
  26. 26. Page 26 Bullying in reverse
  27. 27. Bullying in reverse • Power by position • Power through group dynamic or collective behaviour • Power by workplace regulation Page 27
  28. 28. Page 28 Preventative action
  29. 29. Preventative action • Develop a policy • Affirmatively raise the subject • Express strong disapproval of bullying • Develop appropriate sanctions to use in discipline • Inform the employee of the right to raise and how to raise the issue • Develop methods to sensitize the workforce Page 29
  30. 30. Page 30 Training
  31. 31. Training • Legal • Communicative • Disciplinary • Cultural Page 31
  32. 32. Page 32 Remedial action
  33. 33. Remedial action • Investigate promptly and thoroughly • Take immediate and appropriate corrective action • Take steps calculated to end the harassment or misconduct • Take steps necessary to make the victim whole • Take steps necessary to ensure misconduct is not repeated • Do not make the victim responsible for the remedy Page 33
  34. 34. Page 34 Dealing with a workplace bully
  35. 35. Dealing with a workplace bully • Keep your cool • If you are threatened, walk away • Tell the bully to stop treating you disrespectfully • Report what happened • Provide the employer with any notes, emails, copes of text messages and other evidence Page 35
  36. 36. Page 36 Investigations
  37. 37. Investigations 1 of 3 WHAT SHOULD AN INVESTIGATION INCLUDE? • A prompt, thorough and impartial response • Taking evidence from witnesses • Listening to both the harasser and the complainant’s version of events • A time-scale for resolving the problem • Confidentiality in the majority of cases Page 37
  38. 38. Investigations 2 of 3 AREAS THAT CAN TAINT HARASSMENT INVESTIGATIONS • Rushing to judgement before the investigation is done • Letting employees define harassment for themselves • Waiting too long to investigate • Using a biased investigator • Not letting the accused confront the accusations Page 38
  39. 39. Investigations 3 of 3 AREAS THAT CAN TAINT HARASSMENT INVESTIGATIONS (CONT.) • Not interviewing third parties • Asking leading questions • Interviewing witnesses in front of each other • Not following the organization’s investigation procedures Page 39
  40. 40. Page 40 What should employees do?
  41. 41. What should employees do? • Be made aware - through onboarding, training and other processes - about their rights and personal responsibilities under the policy and understand the organization’s commitment to deal with harassment • Know who to contact if they want to discuss their experiences in order to decide what steps to take • Understand how to take a complaint forward and the timescales for formal procedures
  42. 42. Page 42 Anti-harassment policies
  43. 43. Anti-harassment policies 1 of 3 • Make clear that harassment is strictly prohibited • Define harassment broadly • Provide a detailed description of the conduct prohibited • Inform employees of the procedures for reporting harassment • Identify whom employees should contact if they are subjected to harassment Page 43
  44. 44. Anti-harassment policies 2 of 3 • Permit reporting through a range of channels including any manager, HR representative or anonymous telephone service • Permit both informal and formal complaints of harassment to be made • Require employees to report any incident of harassment, even if it is not directed at them, and regardless of whether they think the employer is aware of it or another employee has reported it Page 44
  45. 45. Anti-harassment policies 3 of 3 • Provide that the employer will investigate and take appropriate preventative and corrective action • Describe the disciplinary measures that the organization may use in a harassment case • Make clear that employees will not be subjected to retaliation for complaining about harassment Page 45
  46. 46. Page 46 Drill
  47. 47. Page 47 Drill
  48. 48. Page 48 Shah v Xerox Canada
  49. 49. Page 49 Conclusion and questions
  50. 50. Page 50 Conclusion and questions Summary Videos Questions
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