Management January 2010

551 views
503 views

Published on

One day training course in the Midlands for the managers and directors of a precision engineering business.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
551
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Management January 2010

  1. 1. Management in 2010<br />by Fluid <br />January 2010<br />
  2. 2. Contents<br />3-4 Introduction to Fluid<br />5-6 Managing your boss<br />7-8 Move into management<br />9-10 Managing change<br />11-12 Managing expectations<br />13-14 Exercise A<br />15-16 Management fads<br />17-18 Using comedy<br />19-20 Management development<br />21-23 Leader or manager?<br />24-25 Exercise B<br />26-28Evidence-based management<br />29-30 Managing more effectively<br />31-32 Challenging negative beliefs<br />33-34 Power of persuasion<br />35-36 Communicating with line managers<br />37-38 Key to good talent management<br />39-40 Improving your listening<br />41-44 Managing the stress of others<br />45-46 Cope with management derailment<br />47-48 Case studies<br />49-50 Exercise C <br />51-52 Conclusion and questions<br />
  3. 3. Page 3<br />Introduction<br />
  4. 4. Page 4<br />Introduction to Fluid<br />Fluid Consulting Limited (Fluid) is a specialist human resources consultancy headed by Tim Holden MCIPD <br />10 years in banking<br />10 years in Human Resources consultancy<br />Fluid trading since 2006<br />The core services provided by Fluid are:<br /><ul><li>Retention
  5. 5. Selection</li></ul>- Attraction<br />- Remuneration & Reward <br />- Outplacement<br />- Training & HR consultancy<br />
  6. 6. Page 5<br />Managing your boss<br />
  7. 7. Page 6<br />Managing your boss<br /><ul><li>Choose the right boss to begin with
  8. 8. Don’t let yourself be bullied
  9. 9. Evaluate your boss’s psyche
  10. 10. Work less
  11. 11. Make your move
  12. 12. Plan
  13. 13. Build your relationship
  14. 14. Make your boss look good
  15. 15. Prove you can do your manager’s job
  16. 16. Become the boss</li></li></ul><li>Page 7<br />Move into management<br />
  17. 17. Page 8<br />Move into management<br /><ul><li>Be sure it’s what you want
  18. 18. Tell your boss
  19. 19. Try before you apply
  20. 20. Meetings are work
  21. 21. Ditch your workmates
  22. 22. Don’t expect love
  23. 23. Believe the corporate dream
  24. 24. Network with other managers
  25. 25. Keep learning
  26. 26. Ask for help</li></li></ul><li>Page 9<br />Managing change<br />
  27. 27. Page 10<br />Managing change<br /><ul><li>Ensure that there is a desire for change
  28. 28. Have a clear, shared vision
  29. 29. Plan for the long term
  30. 30. Involve your key communicators
  31. 31. Explain as early as possible
  32. 32. Reduce the fear factor
  33. 33. Participation and involvement are crucial
  34. 34. Identify the resources you need before you proceed
  35. 35. Keep employees happy and motivated
  36. 36. Face to face communication softens bad news</li></li></ul><li>Page 11<br />Managing expectations<br />
  37. 37. Page 12<br />Managing expectations<br /><ul><li>Get a crystal ball
  38. 38. No crystal ball? Try email
  39. 39. Look on the dark side
  40. 40. Beware of changing goalposts
  41. 41. I’m not that great, really
  42. 42. Don’t keep problems a secret
  43. 43. Know your boss
  44. 44. Expectations cut both ways
  45. 45. Being new
  46. 46. Avoid IT projects</li></li></ul><li>Page 13<br />Exercise A<br />
  47. 47. Page 14<br />Exercise A<br />
  48. 48. Page 15<br />Management fads<br />
  49. 49. Page 16<br /><ul><li>Acronym management
  50. 50. Blue-Sky management
  51. 51. Amnesic management
  52. 52. Anecdotal management
  53. 53. Doppler-Effect management
  54. 54. Email management
  55. 55. PA management
  56. 56. Personal Development management
  57. 57. Reorganisation management
  58. 58. Secrecy management
  59. 59. Total obedience management</li></ul>Management fads<br />
  60. 60. Page 17<br />Using comedy<br />
  61. 61. Page 18<br />Using comedy<br /><ul><li>Preparation
  62. 62. Less is more
  63. 63. Confidence
  64. 64. Responsibility
  65. 65. Courage</li></li></ul><li>Page 19<br />Management development<br />
  66. 66. Page 20<br /><ul><li>Performance improved if the organisation’s development was driven strategically with board support and strong links to business strategy
  67. 67. Performance improved if management development was designed to address managers’ abilities and competencies, motivation and potential to address business needs
  68. 68. Significantly greater employee engagement, a higher organisation performance and greater productivity resulted if organisations had initially reported a high degree of employer responsibility for manager development</li></ul>Management development<br />
  69. 69. Page 21<br />Leader or manager?<br />
  70. 70. Page 22<br /><ul><li>LEADER
  71. 71. Visionary
  72. 72. Passionate
  73. 73. Creative
  74. 74. Flexible
  75. 75. Inspiring
  76. 76. Innovative
  77. 77. Courageous
  78. 78. Imaginative
  79. 79. Experimental
  80. 80. Independent
  81. 81. One who shares knowledge</li></ul>Leader or manager? 1 of 2<br />
  82. 82. Page 23<br /><ul><li>MANAGER
  83. 83. Rational
  84. 84. Consulting
  85. 85. Persistent
  86. 86. Problem-solving
  87. 87. Tough-minded
  88. 88. Analytical
  89. 89. Structured
  90. 90. Deliberative
  91. 91. Authoritative
  92. 92. Stabilising
  93. 93. One who centralises knowledge</li></ul>Leader or manager? 2 of 2<br />
  94. 94. Page 24<br />Exercise B<br />
  95. 95. Page 25<br />Exercise B<br />
  96. 96. Page 26<br />Evidence-based management<br />
  97. 97. Page 27<br /><ul><li>What is it?
  98. 98. Example-ABSENCE
  99. 99. Do I know exactly what the absence level is?
  100. 100. Has the absence level changed?
  101. 101. What is likely to happen to the absence level over time?
  102. 102. How does the absence level compare with norms for my sector?
  103. 103. Do I know the positions and locations of those who are absent?
  104. 104. What is the problem with the level of absence? Does it matter and in what ways?
  105. 105. What internal, organisational evidence do I have for the causes of absence?
  106. 106. How good do I think this evidence is?</li></ul>Evidence-based management 1 of 2<br />
  107. 107. Page 28<br /><ul><li>What does external evidence from research suggest are the causes of absence?
  108. 108. How good is this evidence and can I apply it?
  109. 109. What other causes of absence might there be here?
  110. 110. If the absence level is high, what is the external evidence from research about the effectiveness of interventions to reduce o manage absence?
  111. 111. Is the absence level so high that it requires an intervention?
  112. 112. Will the benefits of interventions outweigh the costs?
  113. 113. How well do I think these interventions might work in my situation?
  114. 114. Might they have unintended negative consequences?
  115. 115. How will I evaluate the effects of interventions?</li></ul>Evidence-based management 2 of 2<br />
  116. 116. Page 29<br />Managing more effectively<br />
  117. 117. Page 30<br /><ul><li>Identify your strengths and development needs by getting feedback from all stakeholders, learn what is expected of you and what the priorities are
  118. 118. Ensure you get the basics right before moving on to more challenging tasks
  119. 119. Spend time measuring and evaluating your activity and its impact
  120. 120. Delegate where you can and make time to understand how systems can improve efficiency and processes
  121. 121. Network and learn from others on how they prioritise and manage their workloads</li></ul>Managing more effectively<br />
  122. 122. Page 31<br />Challenging negative beliefs<br />
  123. 123. Page 32<br /><ul><li>Black or white thinking
  124. 124. Magnification and minimisation
  125. 125. Overgeneralising
  126. 126. Jumping to conclusions
  127. 127. Catastrophising
  128. 128. Challenging beliefs</li></ul>Challenging negative beliefs<br />
  129. 129. Page 33<br />Power of persuasion<br />
  130. 130. Page 34<br /><ul><li>Reciprocity is one of the most powerful tools of persuasion
  131. 131. Having something in common with the person you’re trying to persuade gives you an advantage
  132. 132. Raising or lowering anchor points is a useful technique
  133. 133. Once someone has agreed a deal they are unlikely to go back on it, even if the terms of that deal change</li></ul>Power of persuasion<br />
  134. 134. Page 35<br />Communicating with line managers<br />
  135. 135. Page 36<br /><ul><li>Understand how the company makes its money and what affects success
  136. 136. Choose your moment to communicate with them
  137. 137. Gather data and use it as evidence to support your case
  138. 138. Focus your organisation on people priorities by including them in personal objectives
  139. 139. Give managers the tools they need to make processes work properly
  140. 140. Target the ‘resistors’ and offer individual coaching</li></ul>Communicating with line managers<br />
  141. 141. Page 37<br />Key to good talent management<br />
  142. 142. Page 38<br />Key to good talent management<br /><ul><li>Create your strategy in accordance with your business needs. It sounds like a given but it is not always done.
  143. 143. Take into account not only your high potentials but also your high professionals-they make the organisation work.
  144. 144. The faster you can show success, the greater the acceptance and momentum
  145. 145. Be rigorous. Come up with a system and stick to it. If you change it every year, people get confused.</li></li></ul><li>Page 39<br />Improving your listening<br />
  146. 146. Page 40<br /><ul><li>Put your attention on what the other person is actually saying rather than on the person themselves or what you think they might mean by their words
  147. 147. ‘Soft focus’ your eyes to take in the whole scene rather than looking into the eyes of the other person
  148. 148. Give them time-don’t be impatient
  149. 149. Set your personal agenda aside, even temporarily
  150. 150. Visualise
  151. 151. Believe what the other person is saying
  152. 152. Repeat back some of the words or phrases used
  153. 153. Take notes if appropriate
  154. 154. Turn your internal commentator on or off</li></ul>Improving your listening <br />
  155. 155. Page 41<br />Managing the stress of others<br />
  156. 156. Page 42<br />Managing the stress of others 1 of 3 <br /><ul><li>Help them manage their workload
  157. 157. Regularly discuss their work pressures with them
  158. 158. Allow flexible working
  159. 159. Help them understand how to manage their own stress
  160. 160. Give discretionary time off
  161. 161. Recommend external sources of professional help
  162. 162. Arrange stress management solutions tailored to their needs</li></li></ul><li>Page 43<br />Managing the stress of others 2 of 3 <br /><ul><li>SKILLS TO IMPROVE
  163. 163. Being able to clarify the factors that may lead to stress for individual direct reports
  164. 164. Skills in discussing issues that lead to stress with direct reports
  165. 165. Understanding why people react in the ways they do
  166. 166. Understanding what employees need when they are stressed</li></li></ul><li>Page 44<br />Managing the stress of others 3 of 3 <br /><ul><li>COMPETENCIES FOR MANAGERS-HSE
  167. 167. Respect and responsibility
  168. 168. Managing and communicating existing and future work
  169. 169. Managing the individual in the team
  170. 170. Reasoning and managing difficult situations</li></li></ul><li>Page 45<br />Cope with management derailment<br />
  171. 171. Page 46<br /><ul><li>Understand the warning signs
  172. 172. Pre-empt disruptive behaviour
  173. 173. Facilitate communication
  174. 174. Offer feedback
  175. 175. Don’t ignore the derailer’s colleagues</li></ul>Cope with management derailment<br />
  176. 176. Page 47<br />Case studies<br />
  177. 177. Page 48<br />Case studies<br />
  178. 178. Page 49<br />Exercise C<br />
  179. 179. Page 50<br />Exercise C<br />
  180. 180. Page 51<br />Conclusion & Questions<br />
  181. 181. Page 52<br />Conclusion<br />Summary<br />Questions<br />

×