Management April 2014
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Management April 2014

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Half day open training event held in Hamilton, Canada.

Half day open training event held in Hamilton, Canada.

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Management April 2014 Management April 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • Becoming a better people manager by Toronto Training and HR April 2014
  • CONTENTS 3-4 Introduction 5-7 Pain points for new managers 8-9 Management development 10-11 Internal coaching 12-15 Fostering self-esteem in others 16-17 Organizational factors contributing to self-esteem 18-23 Avoiding real and perceived misconduct 24-27 Strategies for successful managers 28-31 What must a planning task force do? 32-34 Putting together a planning task force 35-36 “Stop doing this and start doing that…please” 37-38 How to develop a team culture 39-41 Encouraging creativity 42-46 Being a strong communicator 47-48 An effective business report 49-50 What does a good plan look like? 51-53 What does a good strategy look like? 54-55 Conclusion, summary and questions Page 2
  • Page 3 Introduction
  • Page 4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden 10 years in banking 15 years in training and human resources Freelance practitioner since 2006 The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are: Training event design Training event delivery HR support with an emphasis on reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers
  • Page 5 Pain points for new managers
  • Pain points for new managers 1 of 2 • Prioritization • Delegation • Addressing performance issues • Managing former peers • Decision making • Leadership style • Networking • Creating a vision and leading change Page 6
  • Pain points for new managers 2 of 2 • Developing a broader perspective • Influencing within a political culture Page 7
  • Page 8 Management development
  • Management development • Definition • Management competences • Formal learning interventions Page 6
  • Page 10 Internal coaching
  • Internal coaching • Senior leadership support • Learning culture/positive focus • Business need • Moderate amount of structure • Multiple levels of measurement • Confidentiality Page 11
  • Page 12 Fostering self-esteem in others
  • Fostering self- esteem in others 1 of 3 • Reaffirm subordinates‟ worth to the organization; offer praise and give constructive criticism • Trust subordinates to perform a job well without having their progress monitored every minute, and without constant suggestions Page 13
  • Fostering self- esteem in others 2 of 3 • Make pay increases based on objective merit and not favouritism • Design work so employees can experience success • Offer enriched work which challenges the knowledge, skills and abilities of the individuals Page 14
  • Fostering self- esteem in others 3 of 3 • Employees should not be restricted by so many rules they feel like they have no discretion • Provide high-quality ad relevant training programs Page 15
  • Page 16 Organizational factors contributing to self- esteem
  • Organizational factors contributing to self-esteem • Supervisory support and respect • Organization structure • Enriched work • Adequate resources • Co-worker support Page 17
  • Page 18 Avoiding real and perceived misconduct
  • Avoiding real and perceived misconduct 1 of 5 • Avoid risky places and situations • Be careful whom you associate with • Socialize in groups • Always have a witness when meeting „privately‟ with an employee or customer of the opposite sex • Be paranoid about what you post online Page 19
  • Avoiding real and perceived misconduct 2 of 5 • Be friendly but not overly familiar • Be generous with praise for exemplary performance, but be cautious about compliments of appearance or attire that may be misinterpreted • Try to include spouses and significant others at office parties Page 20
  • Avoiding real and perceived misconduct 3 of 5 • Avoid drugs and manage alcohol, instead of allowing it to manage you • Don‟t flirt, tease or try to be „sexy cute‟ • Watch how you dress • Be cautious about overnight travel with peers or employees of the opposite sex Page 21
  • Avoiding real and perceived misconduct 4 of 5 • Be careful about working late with an employee of the opposite sex • Rebuff any inappropriate advances immediately and firmly • Cultivate one trusted confidante who will tell you the truth about what they‟re saying about you „out there‟ Page 22
  • Avoiding real and perceived misconduct 5 of 5 • If you feel you have to lie about any behaviour, don‟t do it • When considering any form of questionable or borderline behaviour, ask yourself how would this look to your spouse? Your mother? Your boss? Page 23
  • Page 24 Strategies for successful managers
  • Strategies for successful managers 1 of 3 • Successful managers believe they are ultimately responsible for their team‟s success and failures • Successful managers lower their expectations of others • Successful managers motivate others to think creatively • Successful managers help others achieve their goals and dreams Page 25
  • Strategies for successful managers 2 of 3 • Successful managers challenge their assumptions • Successful managers set written performance standards • Successful managers accept no excuses for lousy performance • Successful managers lead by example Page 26
  • Strategies for successful managers 3 of 3 • Successful managers motivate others to take action • Successful managers create strong relationships with employees Page 27
  • Page 28 What must a planning task force do?
  • What must a planning task force do? 1 of 3 • Appoint a leader and commit to working together unselfishly • Know the purpose of the task force and management‟s desired goal • Understand fully the problem to be solved Page 29
  • What must a planning task force do? 2 of 3 • Assign duties to each individual task force member and establish realistic timelines • Gather relevant data • Create a flexible mindset and be receptive to feedback • Be aware of internal/external limitations • Keep the plan simple and transparent Page 30
  • What must a planning task force do? 3 of 3 • Statement of the final plan must be highly organized and well written • The leader presents a final and comprehensive plan that incudes the problem, objective and strategy Page 31
  • Page 32 Putting together a planning task force
  • Putting together a planning task force 1 of 2 • Seven people • At least three non- managers • Each member should be a good report writer • Designing a good plan to solve a problem is somewhat like detective work • Problem solving requires thinking out of the box and breaking new ground Page 33
  • Putting together a planning task force 2 of 2 • Make sure one member is designated as the leader, and has the authority to keep the team on task • A successful task force is vigorous Page 34
  • Page 35 “Stop doing this and start doing that…please”
  • “Stop doing this and start doing that…please” • Make your proposals timely • Break the news gradually • Don‟t exaggerate the issue • Tell the whole story • Accent the positive • Don‟t „oversell‟ • Invite comments Page 36
  • Page 37 How to develop a team culture
  • How to develop a team culture • Emphasize team goals • Link individual accomplishments to team goals • Accent cooperation • Share the credit for the success of the team Page 38
  • Page 39 Encouraging creativity
  • Encouraging creativity 1 of 2 • Put yourself into the other person‟s shoes • Assume you know nothing about what solution is needed • Actively try to understand what people are saying • Ask dumb questions • Want to listen • Be open to suggestions Page 40
  • Encouraging creativity 2 of 2 • Check out the conditions that caused the problem • Involve everyone in the process while listening for a solution • Provide quick feedback and acting on what you have heard Page 41
  • Page 42 Being a strong communicator
  • Being a strong communicator 1 of 4 • Do you frequently have to explain your letters with follow-up correspondence or telephone calls? • Do you favour short, direct words over multisyllabic ones…or do you believe your position dictates the use of gobbledygook? • Are you dissatisfied with your correspondence until it says precisely what you want it to say?
  • Being a strong communicator 2 of 4 • Do you state your ideas within a familiar context? • Do you present your ideas and the facts to back them up in a logical sequence? • Do you recognize listening as an active and not passive communication skill? • Do you watch speakers for non-verbal clues to their meanings? Page 44
  • Being a strong communicator 3 of 4 • Before answering a speaker, are you usually certain you have taken in his point of view? • When giving instructions, do you frequently assume more knowledge on the part of your employee than he or she actually possesses? Page 45
  • Being a strong communicator 4 of 4 • Do you break complicated procedures down to more easily understood sub-steps? • Do you speak clearly, without slurring or mispronouncing words? • Do you talk too fast or too slowly for comprehension? Page 46
  • Page 47 An effective business report
  • An effective business report • What is the report about and who wrote it? • What does it contribute? • What are its conclusions and recommendations? • What are the implications for the company? Page 48
  • Page 49 What does a good plan look like?
  • What does a good plan look like? • Describe the problem • Explore the root causes • Identify the goal • Explore several strategies to reach the goal • Select the best strategy to accomplish the goal Page 50
  • Page 51 What does a good strategy look like?
  • What does a good strategy look like? 1 of 2 • Identify the actions needed to implement the chosen strategy • Organize steps into logical and efficient sequences • Work out logistics, resources and task assignments Page 52
  • What does a good strategy look like? 2 of 2 • Establish a measurement for determining strategy effectiveness and eventual success • Set up process that can monitor progress and make corrections that deviate from strategy Page 53
  • Page 54 Conclusion, summary and questions
  • Page 55 Conclusion, summary and questions Conclusion Summary Videos Questions