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I'm a survivor! September 2013
 

I'm a survivor! September 2013

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Half day open training event on survivor syndrome held in Toronto, Ontario

Half day open training event on survivor syndrome held in Toronto, Ontario

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    I'm a survivor! September 2013 I'm a survivor! September 2013 Presentation Transcript

    • I’m a survivor! by Toronto Training and HR September 2013
    • CONTENTS 5-6 Definitions 7-8 Work behaviour components 9-12 Typical scenarios 13-14 Strategies 15-17 Emotions 18-21 Forms of loss 22-23 Justice in the workplace 24-25 The organizational re-design process 26-31 Downsizing 32-34 Alternatives to downsizing 35-38 Layoffs 39-41 The costs of layoffs 42-44 What can I say? 45-48 What can I do? 49-50 Conclusion and questions Page 2
    • Page 3 Introduction
    • Page 4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR Toronto Training and HR is a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden 10 years in banking 10 years in training and human resources Freelance practitioner since 2006 The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are: Training event design Training event delivery Reducing costs, saving time plus improving employee engagement and morale Services for job seekers
    • Page 5 Definitions
    • Definitions • Survivor syndrome • Rightsizing • Downsizing • Restructuring • Rationalization • Retrenchment • LIFO • FIFO Page 6
    • Page 7 Work behaviour components
    • Work behaviour components • Lack of productivity and sabotage • Intention for flight • Motivation Page 8
    • Page 9 Typical scenarios
    • Typical scenarios 1 of 3 • Lowered productivity • Fatigue and tiredness • Reduced levels of employee engagement • Higher rates of sickness absence including stress- related health issues • Decline in customer service • Apprehension about the future • Excessive spreading of rumours and gossip Page 10
    • Typical scenarios 2 of 3 • Drinking alcohol or smoking • Withdrawal from team-based activities • Focusing all of one's attention on "flight" or "getting out" of the situation, instead of focusing on work done • Diminished creativity and innovation • Insecurity, anxiety and fear • Resignation and sluggishness Page 11
    • Typical scenarios 3 of 3 • Communication difficulties • Feelings of injustice, distrust and often anger towards the organization • Observation that optimism is not an attitude that squares with the organization’s overriding values • Competitive and very divisive atmosphere • Resistance to change • Intention to leave employment Page 12
    • Page 13 Strategies
    • Strategies • Push or stopping • Pull or detachment Page 14
    • Page 15 Emotions
    • Emotions 1 of 2 • Theoretical frameworks • Basic emotions • Positive and negative emotions • Employee emotions during organizational change • Emotions and change • Organizational perceptions of emotions Page 8
    • Emotions 2 of 2 • Traditional approach • Alternative approach Page 17
    • Page 18 Forms of loss
    • Forms of loss 1 of 3 • Loss of security and support • Loss of control • Loss of positive outlook • Loss of self-efficacy • Loss of territory • Loss of identity • Loss of perceived competence • Loss of relationships • Loss of justice and truth Page 19
    • Forms of loss 2 of 3 THEORIES • Psychodynamic theory • Attachment theory • Task theory • Social learning theory • Cognitive behavioural theory • Constructivist theory • Transition theory Page 20
    • Forms of loss 3 of 3 • Stages of grieving • Sense of justice and supervisory support • Dealing with loss Page 21
    • Page 22 Justice in the workplace
    • Justice in the workplace • Types of justice • Equity theory • Organizational justice theory • Downsizing and justice Page 23
    • Page 24 The organizational re- design process
    • The organizational re-design process • Define key principles • Review programs and activities • Re-design structures and processes • Review roles and functions • Align decisions in planning and strategies Page 25
    • Page 26 Downsizing
    • Downsizing 1 of 5 PERCEPTIONS • Financially effective • Inevitable • Liberating Page 27
    • Downsizing 2 of 5 IDENTIFYING EXCESS POSITIONS • Assess current organizational structure • Pinpoint surplus individuals and overlap • Determine optimal organizational structure • Highlight excess positions in the organizational structure Page 28
    • Downsizing 3 of 5 DECISION TO DOWNSIZE • Cost reduction • Productivity improvement • Responding to competitive threats • Consolidation after a merger or acquisition • Increasing efficiency Page 29
    • Downsizing 4 of 5 WAS IT FAIR? • Whether it was justified • Whether it was consistent with corporate culture • Whether management provided ample advanced notice • Whether management provided adequate explanations • Whether senior managerial levels were also affected Page 30
    • Downsizing 5 of 5 WAS IT FAIR? (CONTINUED) • Extent to which terminated employees were taken care of • Extent to which employees were involved in the downsizing process Page 31
    • Page 32 Alternatives to downsizing
    • Alternatives to downsizing 1 of 2 • Hiring linking to vision • Cross training • Succession planning • Redeployment within the organization • Employee buy-out • Comprehensive savings • Reduced hours • Lower salaries Page 33
    • Alternatives to downsizing 2 of 2 • Attrition • Alternative placement • Leave of absence • Employee buy-outs Page 34
    • Page 35 Layoffs
    • Layoffs 1 of 3 • develop an effective communication strategy which is ongoing and consistent with as much information as possible • plan the layoff process so that it is – and is seen to be – fair, objective and transparent • treat those employees at risk of losing their jobs, are treated with compassion and respect Page 36
    • Layoffs 2 of 3 • try to do all the cuts at the same time and provide a ‘soft landing’ ideally • if possible tell survivors how the decisions were made • make sure that the survivors know that you understand they may experience problems after the restructuring, and that they will be given practical assistance after the layoffs have taken place • be as open and honest with employees as possible to foster trust Page 37
    • Layoffs 3 of 3 • develop success criteria – as well as identifying objectives linked to the layoffs, ensure that targets based on the remaining workforce are developed-one measure of a successful layoff exercise lies in the number of survivors who subsequently remain (rather than resign) and who continue to be motivated and perform at their previous level of competence Page 38
    • Page 39 The costs of layoffs
    • The costs of layoffs 1 of 2 • Severance pay • Paying out accrued vacation and sick pay • Outplacement costs • Cost of rehiring employees in the future • Low morale and risk-adverse survivors • Potential lawsuits • Sabotage Page 40
    • The costs of layoffs 2 of 2 • Workplace violence from aggrieved employees or former employees • Loss of institutional memory and knowledge • Diminished trust in management • Reduced productivity Page 41
    • Page 42 What can I say?
    • What can I say? 1 of 2 CO-WORKERS • Sad to hear about it • Display empathy • Offer to help in any way • Listen • Not too many questions • Let them guide the discussion Page 43
    • What can I say? 2 of 2 MANAGERS • Be open and honest about your feelings • Demonstrate personal empathy • Respect individualism • Prepare and distribute question and answer documents • Shift focus to the future • Offer visible support • Apply multiple communication channels Page 44
    • Page 45 What can I do?
    • What can I do? 1 of 3 • Thorough, two-way consultation with a clear vision of a brighter future • Practical support in managing workloads • Support in skill development to equip staff for new ways of working • Involvement in change programs Page 46
    • What can I do? 2 of 3 RESPONDING TO SURVIVORS • Treatment of survivors • Ignoring and distancing • Managers and organizational silence • Underestimating the survivor loss Page 47
    • What can I do? 3 of 3 SCOPE FOR IMPROVEMENT • Trust in management • Levels of employee engagement • Productivity • Stress levels Page 48
    • Page 49 Conclusion and questions
    • Page 50 Conclusion and questions Summary Videos Questions