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Ethics; is it a place near Lake Erie ? March 2011
 

Ethics; is it a place near Lake Erie ? March 2011

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Half day interactive open workshop in Toronto on ethics.

Half day interactive open workshop in Toronto on ethics.

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    Ethics; is it a place near Lake Erie ? March 2011 Ethics; is it a place near Lake Erie ? March 2011 Presentation Transcript

    • Ethics-is it a place near Lake Erie?
      by Toronto Training and HR
      March 2011
    • Contents
      3-4 Introduction to Toronto Training and HR
      5-6 The new ethical management
      7-9 Ethics and integrity
      10-11 How the best-intentioned managers get derailed
      12-13 Drill
      14-15 Barriers to an ethical organization
      16-21 Ethics-based culture change
      22-24 Dealing with malicious gossip
      25-26 Transformative nature of accountability
      27-28 Dimensions of work ethic
      29-36 Employees mirroring the work ethic around them
      37-38 Character traits
      39-40 Ethical decision-making
      41-43 Stakeholders
      44-45 Overcoming disconnects
      46-48 Self-sabotage of high performers
      49-50 Advantages in acting ethically
      51-52 Conclusion and questions
    • Page 3
      Introduction
    • Page 4
      Introduction to Toronto Training and HR
      Toronto Training and HRis a specialist training and human resources consultancy headed by Timothy Holden
      10 years in banking
      10 years in training and human resources
      Freelance practitioner since 2006
      The core services provided by Toronto Training and HR are:
      • Training course design
      • Training course delivery
      - Reducing costs
      • Saving time
      • Improving employee engagement & morale
      • Services for job seekers
    • Page 5
      The new ethical management
    • Page 6
      The new ethical management
      What is it?
      Where did it come from?
      Where is it going?
    • Page 7
      Ethics and integrity
    • Page 8
      Ethics and integrity 1 of 2
      Relationships with your family and friends
      Attitude and behaviour towards money
      Commitments to others, especially in the business/work
    • Page 9
      Ethics and integrity 2 of 2
      Identify men and women of great character
      Analyze your key relationships
      Keep your word
    • Page 10
      How the best-intentioned managers get derailed
    • Page 11
      How the best-intentioned managers get derailed
      Goals that reward unethical behaviour
      Conflicts of interest that motivate people
      to ignore bad behaviour when they have something to lose by recognizing it
      A tendency to overlook dirty work that’s been outsourced to others
      An inability to notice when behaviour deteriorates gradually
      A tendency to overlook unethical decisions
      when the outcome is good
    • Page 12
      Drill
    • Page 13
      Drill
    • Page 14
      Barriers to an ethical organization
    • Page 15
      Barriers to an ethical organization
      Ill-conceived goals
      Motivated blindness
      Indirect blindness
      The slippery slope
      Overvaluing outcomes
    • Page 16
      Ethics-based culture change
    • Page 17
      Ethics-based culture change 1 of 5
      You can’t force culture—you can only create environment
      You are on the outside what you are on the inside—no debate
      Success is doing the right things the right way
      People do what they are incentivised to do
      Input=Output
    • Page 18
      Ethics-based culture change 2 of 5
      Embracing ethical values can change how your company runs—it can revitalize your purpose, policies, and practices
      People who don’t fit are immediately weeded out
      People respect their leaders and each other
    • Page 19
      Ethics-based culture change 3 of 5
      CREATING AN ETHICAL VALUES COMPASS
      Ask your colleagues: What do you want this company to look like?
      Narrow the answers
      Translate these ethical values into behaviours you can monitor
      Figure out where a course change is in order
      Settle in for the long haul
    • Page 20
      Ethics-based culture change 4 of 5
      CHARACTERISTICS SETTING EMPLOYERS APART
      Leaders encourage a two-way dialogue about business conduct
      The organization’s code of ethics is a living document
      Ethics isn’t a “program” but a way of doing business
      Training about ethics is relevant, maybe even fun
      Employees are actively engaged as corporate citizens, aligned with the company’s values
    • Page 21
      Ethics-based culture change 5 of 5
      SIMPLE ADDITIONS TO EXISTING PRACTICES
      Make ethics a priority
      Set a good example of ethical conduct
      Keep commitments
      Provide information about culture and compliance
      Consider ethics in decision-making
      Talk about ethics in the workplace
    • Page 22
      Dealing with malicious gossip
    • Page 23
      Dealing with malicious gossip 1 of 2
      When you pass information, casually or not, do so in a manner that ensures that the message heard by those listening is as accurate as possible. Avoid insinuations, quibbling, and half-truths.
      If you are not sure of the information's accuracy, don't repeat it.
    • Page 24
      Dealing with malicious gossip 2 of 2
      If it is a case of obvious rumour spreading or malicious gossiping, try to stop it in an appropriate manner such as interrupting the speaker and
      questioning the source of information.
      Let it be known that you do not approve of such activity.
      Seek help from co-workers, team members, supervisor, manager or Human Resources - whatever is appropriate to stop the rumour mill.
    • Page 25
      Transformative power of accountability
    • Page 26
      Transformative power of accountability
      To see it
      To own it
      To solve it
      To do it
    • Page 27
      Dimensions of work ethic
    • Page 28
      Dimensions of work ethic
      Self-reliance
      Morality/ethics
      Leisure
      Hard work
      Centrality of work
      Wasted time
      Delay of gratification
    • Page 29
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them
    • Page 30
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 1 of 7
      BELL CURVE FACING MANAGERS
      On the far right are the most helpful of the group, those "dedicated co-operators" who by personal conviction will contribute their best to the common cause without worrying much about what the rest are doing.
      On the far left are a few "dedicated free riders," people who in almost any situation will let the others do the heavy lifting and keep their own resources for themselves.
    • Page 31
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 2 of 7
      BELL CURVE FACING MANAGERS
      In between the extremes are those who reciprocate to various degrees. This majority of people will meet cooperation with cooperation and selfishness with selfishness.
    • Page 32
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 3 of 7
      CRUCIAL FACTS
      First, even though there are incentives to freeload from the very beginning, a large proportion of people start by venturing some of their money, maybe to test the waters, maybe out of a sense of morality. They arrive at a job fully prepared to cooperate with the group- if they find cooperation to be the norm.
    • Page 33
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 4 of 7
      CRUCIAL FACTS
      Second, without any way of holding team members accountable for their work on the group's behalf, some will coast. Taking advantage of the group in this way creates resentment that causes many of those originally willing members to withhold what they control, and this snowballs into an almost perfectly selfish workgroup that loses the chance of making solid profits.
    • Page 34
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 5 of 7
      CRUCIAL FACTS
      Second, without any way of holding team members accountable for their work on the group's behalf, some will coast. Taking advantage of the group in this way creates resentment that causes many of those originally willing members to withhold what they control, and this snowballs into an almost perfectly selfish workgroup that loses the chance of making solid profits.
    • Page 35
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 6 of 7
      CRUCIAL FACTS
      Third, even when it is personally expensive to punish another team member, many participants will "invest" in keeping the game fair. Researchers call this "altruistic punishment" because it requires a player to spend his own
      money to enforce the group's interest. " This suggests that even with performance-based bonuses that create a risk of neglecting their own rewards for a while, employees' attention can be seriously diverted when a bad apple is in the barrel.
    • Page 36
      Employees mirroring the work ethic around them 7 of 7
      CRUCIAL FACTS
      Fourth, if team members can be punished for slacking, the slackers behave better and the naturally cooperative people, seeing a fairer system, become more willing to invest. The group's profits rise.
    • Page 37
      Character traits
    • Page 38
      Character traits
      Vocation
      Stewardship
      Virtue
      Heart
    • Page 39
      Ethical decision making
    • Page 40
      Ethical decision making
      Transparency
      Effect
      Fairness
    • Page 41
      Stakeholders
    • Page 42
      Stakeholders 1 of 2
      shareholders
      trustees
      guarantors
      investors
      funding bodies
      distribution partners
      marketing partners
      licensors
      licensees
      approving bodies
    • Page 43
      Stakeholders 2 of 2
      regulatory authorities
      endorsers and 'recommenders'
      advisors and consultants
      employees
      customers
      suppliers
      the local population (community)
      the regional general public
      national general public
      international communities
      humankind
    • Page 44
      Overcoming disconnects
    • Page 45
      Overcoming disconnects
      Generational
      Short-termism
      Trust
    • Page 46
      Self-sabotage of high performers
    • Page 47
      Self-sabotage of high performers 1 of 2
      BEHAVIOR EMERGES FROM…
      awed by success, we project a “halo” around the head of those who achieve it, signifying they can do no wrong
      the “halo” influences how we view and describe them and biases how they view and describe themselves
      they seek to protect themselves against having to admit failure or weakness and suffer shame
    • Page 48
      Self-sabotage of high performers 2 of 2
      HELPING VICTIMS OF SUCCESS
      Resisting help-remove resistance, a safe learning opportunity
      Self-conception-redirect the need to achieve, detachment
    • Page 49
      Advantages in acting ethically
    • Page 50
      Advantages in acting ethically
      Competitive advantage
      Improved employee retention and attraction
      Investment
      Morale and culture
      Reputation
      Legal and regulatory reasons
      Legacy
    • Page 51
      Conclusion & Questions
    • Page 52
      Conclusion
      Summary
      Questions