AL ASK A O F F I C I A L S TAT E V A C AT I O N P L A N N E R            T R A V E L A L A S K A   .   C O M
the experience of a lifetimeThe Alaska Travel Industry Association (ATIA) invites      Incredible scenery, spectacular wil...
Hiking, Kodiak                                                                    It will change                          ...
AlaskaThe state is so immense, it’s easier to think of it asfive distinct regions. To help you understand theseregions, we...
Maps Not To Scale
turn dreams into realitySummit Lake, The Kenai
Alaska brown bear         More mountains than buildings,               more wildlife than people and             more glac...
adventure aboundsSuspension bridge, Ketchikan
“The trip to Alaska was, by far,     the most memorable vacation of my life.”                                             ...
wildlife watchingMoose
“The moose crossed the road right in front of us.      I’ll never forget it …              it was a mother and her calf.” ...
explore unique culturesTraditional Alutiiq dancer, Kodiak
“We were treated to special dances and a         demonstration of totem pole carving.”                                    ...
always in seasonDog Mushing
See the Midnight Sun or                              the Northern LightsPeak SeasonMid-May to Mid-SeptemberThis is when mo...
stay                                     a few days or a few weeksWith its vast scenic landscapes and uniquecultural histo...
take                                                   Alaska home with you                                               ...
travelAlaska is accessible year-round by air,land or sea. Many visitors choose to                                         ...
Fly to AlaskaFlying to Alaska is as easy and affordableas flying to many familiar vacation spots.More than a dozen airlines...
insideOnce in Alaska, you can get around in a va-riety of ways. Keep your personal travel stylein mind. Consider a package...
AlaskaCrossing the Border               Driving                                                           traveler basics ...
your trip starts here   Give us seven days, well give   you the trip of a lifetime   The following 7-day itineraries give ...
Alaska SeaLife Center, SewardLand of Natural WondersAnchorage & The KenaiThe ideal place to experience a great mix of Alas...
Valdez                                                The Alaskan Pioneer                                                A...
FairbanksThe Heartland Fairbanks to Anchorage Whether you fly into Alaska’s biggest cities or drive in through Tok, the roa...
JuneauThe Seafarer     Lake Louise Coastal Cruise A cruise through the Inside Passage across the gulf through Prince Willi...
Totems, Ketchikan                                                     The Inside Passage Explorer                         ...
Far NorthWestern ArcticThe communities ofAlaska’s Far North areaccessible from Fair-banks or Anchoragevia jet or small air...
Far North Region Travel Directory                                                                                         ...
Southwest                      Kodiak Archipelago                  Kodiak is the principal                  town on Kodiak...
Southwest Region Travel Directory                                                                                         ...
Inside PassageSouthern RegionSome visitors begin theirAlaska adventure on thestate ferry system fromBellingham, Washington...
Inside Passage Region Travel Directory                                                                                    ...
Southcentral                Anchorage                Alaska’s largest city                   Anchorage (pop.              ...
Southcentral Region Travel Directory                                                                                      ...
Interior                                                                                       Wiseman               Alask...
Interior Region Travel Directory                                                                                          ...
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011
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Alaska travel 2011 - Guía oficial de viaje a Alaska 2011

  1. 1. AL ASK A O F F I C I A L S TAT E V A C AT I O N P L A N N E R T R A V E L A L A S K A . C O M
  2. 2. the experience of a lifetimeThe Alaska Travel Industry Association (ATIA) invites Incredible scenery, spectacular wildlife and friendlyyou to visit Alaska and experience it for yourself. hospitality, to name a few. This vacation planner isFrom small bed and breakfasts to magnificent lodges, designed to help you discover the special places andfrom river rafting to glacier cruises and everything in diverse vacation possibilities that make Alaska suchbetween, we’ll show you the best the state has to offer. an extraordinary experience.TravelAlaska.comNorthern Lights, North of Palmer, October
  3. 3. Hiking, Kodiak It will change your life forever The people, the places, the beauty — it’s like nothing else on earth. And when you visit,Table of Contents Alaska becomes a part of you forever. In fact,Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 every Alaskan you meet will undoubtedly tell you the story of a personal friend who came toTrip Planning Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Alaska to visit and never left. Make it AlaskaItineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-25 this year!Regional Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-35How to Use the Travel Directory . . . . . . .36Statewide Businesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Alaska brown bearsFar North Businesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48Southwest Businesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50Inside Passage Businesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53Southcentral Businesses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62Interior Businesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81Camping/RV Parks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90Alaska’s Parklands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91Community Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92Calendar of Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94Alaska’s Scenic Byways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96Front Cover: Seward Highway, Kenai PeninsulaBack Cover: Fairbanks
  4. 4. AlaskaThe state is so immense, it’s easier to think of it asfive distinct regions. To help you understand theseregions, we’ve color-coded them as shown below.You’ll also find a statewide section to assist you asyou explore the different areas of Alaska. For moreinformation on the communities in each region,see pages 26-35.Far NorthSouthwestInside PassageSouthcentralInterior
  5. 5. Maps Not To Scale
  6. 6. turn dreams into realitySummit Lake, The Kenai
  7. 7. Alaska brown bear More mountains than buildings, more wildlife than people and more glaciers than stoplights. Alaska – it’s amazingly different, with the tallest mountains, the largest area of national parklands, the highest concentration of glaciers and the longest stretch of coastline of all the United States. Alaska is a place of magnificence, but it’s not beyond your reach. This vacation planner has been designed to help you decide where you want to go and what you want to do. You will find valuable information about special points of interest and the many activities to choose from as you prepare for your unforgettable experience. Alaska is closer than you might think. With direct flights from many major cities in the U.S. you’ll find that getting to Alaska is easier than ever. In fact, you could be here tomorrow.Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  8. 8. adventure aboundsSuspension bridge, Ketchikan
  9. 9. “The trip to Alaska was, by far, the most memorable vacation of my life.” - Cindy S., Loveland, CO Alaska has some of the most incredible scen- Department of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish. For contact ery to be found in the United States. In order information, visit www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/statewide/reghome.cfm. to enjoy all the state has to offer, visitors must get out and experience it for themselves. Hunting in Alaska provides a full range of guided and unguided ex- periences. Alaska is famous for its huge moose, vast caribou herds, Enjoy the Outdoors – brown bears, Dall sheep, mountain goats and Sitka black-tailed deer. From the Mild to the Wild The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Even if you don’t have a lot of outdoor experi- Conservation provides information on hunting regulations at ence, day excursions and guided tours allow www.wildlife.alaska.gov. you to discover true Alaska wilderness dur- ing the day and sleep in a comfortable bed at night. For the seasoned outdoor expert, Alaska is teeming with opportunities for rug- ged, backcountry treks. Whether you prefer to hike on an ice age glacier, skim the wilder- ness in a “bush” plane or take a dog sled ride, you’ll find plenty of options to experience the Alaska you’ve always dreamed about. The state’s many famous rivers, lakes and protected coastal waters offer the chance to experience rafting, kayaking or jet boat rides from mild to wild. No matter what your interest, you’re sure to find some adventures tailor-made for you. Find a Sportsman’s Paradise River rafting Alaska offers some of the most diverse and in- credible fishing in the world. You can pull off Discover Ecotourism at its Best the road and drop a line into a roadside river Ecotourism is responsible travel to natural areas while preserving or charter a boat to help you reel in one of the environment and improving the well-being of local people. Alaska’s enormous halibut. Fly-in fishing, wil- Alaska is a prime year-round destination for visitors seeking a more derness lodges and fish camps offer once-in-a- personal connection with nature, culture and wilderness. Ecotourism lifetime experiences. In all, more than 386 fish means you leave little or no impact during your visit so that future species inhabit Alaska’s salt and fresh waters. visitors can enjoy the same beauty and quality experience of Alaska’s A complete guide to freshwater and saltwater special places. Using established paths rather than disturbing fishing regulations is available from the Alaska vegetation, limiting campfires and being careful not to litter are all highly recommended. Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  10. 10. wildlife watchingMoose
  11. 11. “The moose crossed the road right in front of us. I’ll never forget it … it was a mother and her calf.” - Nicky W., Fernley, NV With large caribou herds migrating across Alaska’s interior, millions of salmon spawn- ing in its rivers and the world-famous Kodiak brown bears – visitors can’t help but enjoy the diversity of Alaska’s wildlife. Wildlife viewing opportunities are abundant in Alaska. Take a guided tour through a national or state park to see bear and caribou or a day cruise to see puf- fins, sea otters and humpback and killer whales. Even a leisurely walk on Alaska’s extensive trail system may put you in a spot where you’ll cross paths with moose or Dall sheep. You can take a flightseeing trip that specializes in wildlife viewing by air, take wildlife tours by motorcoach or participate in a guided tour that specializes in bear viewing, whale watching or bird watching. Or for guaranteed wildlife viewing take a trip to the Alaska Dall Sheep Wildlife Conservation Center in Portage, Wildlife Viewing Tips the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward or the Alaska Zoo in Anchorage. Wildlife viewing takes on a different dimen- sion in the winter months, as many animals are easier to see against a backdrop of white snow. Watch about 3,000 bald eagles gather time to spot to feed on salmon at the Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve near Haines. Moose, fox and various salmon to avoid surprising moose and bears species of birds can be spotted during winter. No matter which path you choose, For more information on wildlife viewing, visit you’ll remember it for a lifetime. www.wildlifeviewing.alaska.gov Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  12. 12. explore unique culturesTraditional Alutiiq dancer, Kodiak
  13. 13. “We were treated to special dances and a demonstration of totem pole carving.” – Sue M., Springfield, VAAlaska’s intriguing history is closely inter- can join historical tours in towns and regions with strong Russiantwined with that of the people who settled connections or explore museums with exhibits exploring Russia’shere thousands of years ago. Their diverse role in Alaskan history such as the Baranov Museum in Kodiak orculture bears imprints of every group that has Sitka Russian Church and National Historical Park. The strength ofmade Alaska its home, from the first ice age Alaska’s Russian heritage is still visible in the onion-shaped domes ofnomads to Russian fur traders to the gold min- Russian Orthodox churches that rise above many Alaska towns.ers who came to seek their fortunes.Alaska Native LifeToday, Alaska Natives comprise almost 16percent of Alaska’s population. These in-digenous people interweave today’s modernlifestyle with their own cultural threads andspiritual beliefs, preserving the gifts of tradi-tion for the coming generations. From tradi-tional music and dance to beautiful Nativeart, there are many opportunities and venuesfor Alaska visitors to experience an integralpart of Alaska’s culture and history. Visit theAlaska Native Heritage Center, a “livingmuseum” in Anchorage, the Alutiiq Museumand Archaeological Repository in Kodiak, theKenai Visitors and Cultural Center in Kenai Gold panning demonstration, Fairbanksor the famous totem exhibits in Ketchikan.Go on a guided tour – a tour to Barrow will A Quest for Goldtake you to the site of the Inupiat Heritage The lure of gold touched almost every corner of Alaska. In Skagway,Center, or view traditional style clan houses in join a ranger-guided walking tour through the restored buildingsWrangell, Haines, Sitka and other communi- of the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park or experienceties in Alaska. Gold Rush era travel on the White Pass & Yukon Route Railway. Try your hand at panning for gold in many Alaska cities, includingThe History of Russian America Juneau, Fairbanks, Skagway, Girdwood and Nome or view mammothBy the time America bought the Alaska historical gold dredges in Fairbanks and Nome.Territory, Russians had been living here formore than 120 years. The strength of Alaska’sRussian heritage is still visible today. Visitors Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  14. 14. always in seasonDog Mushing
  15. 15. See the Midnight Sun or the Northern LightsPeak SeasonMid-May to Mid-SeptemberThis is when most of Alaska’s visitors travel.The days are longest, the temperatures warm-est. Some activities or accommodations mayonly be available during this time. This sea-son is ideal for outdoor activities like hiking,camping, river rafting, flightseeing and, ofcourse, world-famous fishing.Shoulder SeasonEarly May, Late September and OctoberThere are fewer visitors in May, September Alaska Railroadand October. This is when you’re likely to finddiscounts on travel and activities. The weath-er in the shoulder season is often very mild,and most summer activities are still offered.WinterNovember to AprilWinter is a time when Alaska sparkles andshines, when much of the land is covered bya blanket of soft snow. This is the time to seethe northern lights, share in the excitementof the world-famous Iditarod Trail Sled DogRace (Anchorage to Nome), watch the WorldIce Art Championships in Fairbanks or enjoythe Anchorage Fur Rendezvous, and Tour ofAnchorage. You’ll find an abundance of win-ter activities, including downhill, heli- andcross-country skiing, snowmachining, snow-shoeing and dog mushing. Glenn Highway Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  16. 16. stay a few days or a few weeksWith its vast scenic landscapes and uniquecultural history, Alaska presents many visionsof a dream vacation — and you’re sure to seeyourself in our sample itineraries on Pages20-25. The amount of time you have availablefor your vacation will help you decide the bestway to get to and from Alaska, how to getaround the state and what you want to do orsee. If you have a week, you have enough timefor a memorable Alaska vacation. Here aresome suggestions to help you get started:7 Days or Less most of your time exploring day trips around that area unique roadside communities Childs Glacier, Cordova 14 Days or More7 to 14 Days methods of transportation way and take a cruiseship or the state ferry in the other direction regions of the state by road, adding occasional excursions and adventures such as or guided rafting and fishing trips Alaska’s diverse landscape state’s remote regions to learn more about Alaska’s rich culture two days of intensive touring the tour operators to handle all the details for you
  17. 17. take Alaska home with you Made in Alaska The official “Made in Alaska” logo indicates an item was made by an Alaska resident or company. The Silver Hand emblem symbolizes authentic Alaska Native handicrafts. The shop or gallery where you purchase a piece should be able to tell you the artist’s name, cultural background, vil- lage or region of origin. Wild Alaska Seafood With more than 3 million lakes, 3,000 rivers and 34,000 miles (57,718 km) of coastline, Alaska is one of the most bountiful fishing regions in the world, producing seafood known for its abundance and variety. Among them: five species of salmon, three types of crab and several varieties of whitefish. Swimming wild in these icy pure waters and feeding on a natural diet, Alaska Seafood has an unparalleled flavor prized by chefs and connoisseurs alike. You’ll find fresh Alaska seafood sold all over the state, and merchants are happy to help you ship it home. For Alaska seafood recipes, visit www.alaskaseafood.org/recipes. Wild Alaska SalmonShoppingWherever you go, you’ll find unique Alaskanproducts and crafts. Look for gold nuggetjewelry, items carved from ivory and jade, orhandmade clothing and toys. Alaskan arts andcrafts are some of the most beautiful in theworld. In fact, shopping in the Last Frontier isan adventure in itself. Choose from collectors’items made from animal skins, fur or bone andwoven baskets of beach grass, bark or baleen.Or shop for local crafts, handmade soaps andjewelry. Locally grown produce abounds inopen-air markets during the summer. Or youcan stock up on famous Alaskan delicacieslike canned and smoked salmon, wild berryproducts and reindeer sausage. Disabled visitors can access a variety of activities Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  18. 18. travelAlaska is accessible year-round by air,land or sea. Many visitors choose to by land, air or seacombine modes of travel, arriving by airand departing by sea or driving to Alaskaand then boarding the ferry for the triphome. Each has advantages and offersa unique perspective. For instance, thebest way to see the coastline is by ferry orcruiseship, while there are certain typesof wildlife you may only see by takingthe open road. And if you want a birds-eye view of the glaciers, take an airplaneor day cruise. No matter what your inter-ests, you’re sure to find it on your journeyto Alaska. Alaska Marine Highway Trip Planning Distance Guide The MILEPOST® Approximate driving distances in miles between principal points by the most direct overland routes. MILEAGE CHART (Marine access routes are not included here.) Dawson Creek Prince Rupert Dawson City Whitehorse Anchorage Vancouver Edmonton Fairbanks Skagway Seward Calgary Seattle Haines Homer Valdez Tok Anchorage 2160 515 1608 1975 358 775 226 1605 2435 126 832 328 304 2288 724 Anchorage Calgary 2160 1747 552 185 2038 1687 2386 950 738 2286 1544 1832 2086 605 1436 Calgary Dawson City 515 1747 1195 1562 393 578 741 1192 2022 641 435 187 441 1915 327 Dawson City Dawson Creek 1608 552 1195 367 1486 1135 1834 706 827 1734 992 1280 1534 728 884 Dawson Creek Edmonton 1975 185 1562 367 1853 1502 2201 906 923 2101 1359 1647 1901 720 1251 Edmonton Fairbanks 358 2038 393 1486 1853 653 584 1483 2313 484 710 206 364 2172 602 Fairbanks Haines 775 1687 578 1135 1502 653 1001 1132 1962 901 359 447 701 1650 251 Haines Homer 226 2386 741 1834 2201 584 1001 1831 2661 173 1058 554 530 2509 950 Homer Prince Rupert 1605 950 1192 706 906 1483 1132 1831 1033 1731 989 1277 1531 934 881 Prince Rupert Seattle 2435 738 2022 827 923 2313 1962 2661 1033 2561 1819 2107 2361 141 1904 Seattle Seward 126 2286 641 1734 2101 484 901 173 1731 2561 958 454 430 2415 850 Seward Skagway 832 1544 435 992 1359 710 359 1058 989 1819 958 504 758 1629 108 Skagway Tok 328 1832 187 1280 1647 206 447 554 1277 2107 454 504 254 1970 396 Tok Valdez 304 2086 441 1534 1901 364 701 530 1531 2361 430 758 254 2237 650 Valdez Vancouver 2288 605 1915 728 720 2172 1650 2509 934 141 2415 1629 1970 2237 1587 Vancouver Whitehorse 724 1436 327 884 1251 602 251 950 881 1904 850 108 396 650 1587 Whitehorse 1 mile = 1.6 kilometers ©The MILEPOST (www.themilepost.com), used with permission.
  19. 19. Fly to AlaskaFlying to Alaska is as easy and affordableas flying to many familiar vacation spots.More than a dozen airlines provide service toAlaska. Direct flights are available from manyU.S. cities. Travel time ranges from 3 hoursto about 7.5 hours. Fly to one of Alaska’smajor airports in Anchorage, Fairbanks,Juneau or Ketchikan for connecting flights toother communities.Take a CruiseA cruise to Alaska is anything but typical.Cruises are available in a variety of sizes, fromlarge cruiseships, small yachts and sternwheel-ers. Many travelers take a cruise one waythen get off the ship to explore the interior ofAlaska and return by air. Cruises operate May Alaska State Ferrythrough September. Ride the Alaska Marine Highway The state-owned ferry system is called a “marine highway” because it provides vital year-round transportation service for more than 30 coastal communities. The route, which is designated a National Scenic Byway and All-American Road, means spectacular coastal scenery along the route and rich cultural history in port communi- ties. Walk on or bring your car, RV, bicycle or motorcycle for a re- laxed, informal way to travel. Drive the Alaska Highway Alaska can be reached by driving the scenic Alaska-Canada Highway (or ALCAN). The road is fully paved and thoroughly modernized – only the scenery remains wild. Towns and traveler ser- vices appear at frequent intervals. The highway is open year-round, although some businesses close for the winter. It takes about five days to travel main routes from the Pacific Northwest, through Canada, to Alaska. Travel by car, motorhome or as part of a motorcoach tour. For more information about driving to Alaska, visit www.NorthToAlaska.com Alaska Highway Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  20. 20. insideOnce in Alaska, you can get around in a va-riety of ways. Keep your personal travel stylein mind. Consider a package tour if you prefer Alaska Whitehorse in the Yukon, giving prospectors access to the gold fields beyond. Today, the White Pass offers narrated excursions in tradi- tional parlor cars, traveling the “Scenic Railway of the World.”leaving the details to someone else. Or youmight prefer to travel independently, explor- Van & Bus Traveling Alaska at your own pace. A number of tour companies both large and small provide transporta- tion for visitors throughout the summer. With this option, you don’tDriving need to worry about logistics or mapping out your route, and you areAlaska has more scenic highways than any free to relax and enjoy the view. You can choose from point-to-pointother state in America, and you can see it for transportation or multi-day, all-inclusive tours.yourself by driving its highways. You can renta standard car or RV and easily cover much Air Taxis & Chartersof Alaska’s road system. You’ll find that four- Scheduled air taxi and air charter service provides access to smallwheel drive is not necessary to get around and communities and remote destinations via propeller-driven “bushthat you really can’t get lost when you drive in planes.” There are many good reasons to travel by small plane: aAlaska. In Anchorage, for example, there are fly-out fishing experience, a visit to a Native community, access to aonly two highways that leave the city – one wilderness lodge or the unique Alaskan activity of flightseeing. Thesegoing north, the other south. Sooner or later, small air carriers serve thousands of Alaskans and visitors every year.you’re bound to arrive someplace wonderful.So if you feel comfortable driving at home, Travel by Seayou’ll feel comfortable driving in Alaska, too. Many tour companies offer port-to-port travel and single-day or multi-day excursions, while the Alaska Marine Highway System pro-Rail Travel vides practical, dependable ferry passages and the ability to transportThe Alaska Railroad provides passenger ser- your car or RV. Sail point-to-point and trace hundreds of miles ofvice on a scenic 500 mile (804 km) route breathtaking coastline.running as far south as Seward and as farnorth as Fairbanks. The Alaska Railroad offers Things to Rememberunique double-decker glass-domed cars thatprovide passengers an unrestricted view of full banking services and other traveler conveniences.the landscape.The White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad wasbuilt in 1898 at the height of the Klondike hour earlier than Pacific Time. The most western Aleutian IslandsGold Rush. This 110 mile (177 km) pri- and St. Lawrence Island are on Hawaiian-Aleutian Time.vate railway linked the port of Skagway to
  21. 21. AlaskaCrossing the Border Driving traveler basics Disabled Visitor ServicesFirearms Additional Information – Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  22. 22. your trip starts here Give us seven days, well give you the trip of a lifetime The following 7-day itineraries give you an idea of some of the things you can see and do with just one week in Alaska. These are meant as a starting point to customize your own individual adventure. For example, you can easily combine two itineraries to make a 14-day itinerary or reverse the route of any trip. For more suggestions and sample itineraries, log on to TravelAlaska.com.Along the Seward Highway
  23. 23. Alaska SeaLife Center, SewardLand of Natural WondersAnchorage & The KenaiThe ideal place to experience a great mix of Alaskan culture and wildlife.DAY 1 AnchorageExperience the wonders of Alaska’s indigenous people at the Alaska Native Heritage Center.Climb Flattop Mountain, one of the city’s popular day hikes, or stroll a peaceful, wooded trailin Bicentennial Park. Visit the Alaska Zoo or tee off under the midnight sun before capping theevening with a Broadway show.DAY 2 AnchorageStart the day on the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail with views of Cook Inlet and six mountainranges. Visit Sunshine Plaza for a historical view of the 1964 earthquake or see it firsthand atEarthquake Park. Then drive toward Turnagain Arm to Potter Marsh, home to more than 130species of waterfowl. Town Square, AnchorageDAY 3 Anchorage - SewardHead 126 miles (203 km) south via the Seward Highway, a National Scenic Byway and All-American Road. In Seward, visit the Alaska SeaLife Center and Exit Glacier, one of Alaska’smost accessible glaciers. Take a boat tour of the Kenai Fjords National Park to see a variety of sealife such as otters, sea lions and puffins.DAY 4 Seward - Soldotna - KenaiDrive through the Chugach National Forest west to Soldotna, famous for Kenai River Kingsalmon, and the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, home to moose and other wildlife. Visit nearbyKenai, rich in history and culture, and tour the Holy Assumption Russian Orthodox Church, aNational Historic Landmark.DAY 5 Kenai - HomerTake a morning drive south along the bluffs of Cook Inlet, where sightings of beluga whales andseals are common. At the end of the road you’ll reach Homer, a bustling artist community andthe Halibut Capital of the World. Take an afternoon to explore Homer’s historic harbor walkand eclectic art galleries. A Lodge on The KenaiDAY 6 Homer 2-DAY ADD-ON KodiakExplore the Homer Spit with miles of beaches, charter a fishing expedition or take a water taxi toHalibut Cove, a quiet paradise tucked away in Kachemak Bay State Park. From Anchorage, fly to Kodiak Island, Alaska’s Emerald Isle. Explore Kodiak’sDAY 7 Homer - Girdwood - Anchorage magnificent coastal scenery by land and by sea, enjoy world-class sport fishing, viewWhile driving to Anchorage, stop at Portage Glacier for a boat tour or visit the Alaska Wildlife Kodiak brown bears, marvel at the marineConservation Center for wildlife viewing. Eat lunch in Girdwood, home to a luxury year-round wildlife and birds and learn about Kodiak’sresort based at sea level. Ride the enclosed aerial tram up Mt. Alyeska for spectacular views. rich Alutiiq and Russian heritage. Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  24. 24. Valdez The Alaskan Pioneer Anchorage to Mat-Su & Valdez Explore the state like a true Alaskan – by riverboat, back road, on foot and by ferry. From Anchorage to the Mat-Su and on to Valdez, experience Alaska’s pioneer culture of gold mining, glacier trekking, fishing and wilderness adventure. DAY 1 Anchorage - Wasilla Fly into Anchorage and experience the many shops, museums and art galleries. Enjoy a leisurely walk on the scenic Tony Knowles Coastal Trail accessible from downtown or take a hike in Kincaid Park. Rent a car or RV and drive 45 miles (72 km) north to Wasilla, home of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Visit Iditarod Headquarters for a sled dog ride and learn about Alaska’s unique history. DAY 2 Wasilla - Palmer Driving north on the Parks Highway, take an “off the beaten path” road to Hatcher Pass and Hatcher Pass Independence Mine State Historical Park. Look for wildlife and old gold mines nearby. Take an alpine tundra hike or lunch at a mountain lodge. Continue to Palmer. DAY 3 Palmer - Glennallen Travel north on the Glenn Highway National Scenic Byway to visit the Musk Ox Farm and Matanuska Glacier, Alaska’s largest road-accessible glacier. DAY 4 Glennallen - Copper Center Enjoy one of the area’s many recreational activities, from hiking and river running to fishing. From Copper Center, stop at the visitor center for a view of the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, located in one of the nation’s largest national parks. Spend the night in Glennallen or Copper Center. DAY 5 Copper Center - Valdez Take the Scenic Byway south and stop to view Worthington Glacier, accessible just off the highway atop Thompson Pass. Once in Valdez, take a day cruise in Prince William Sound to Columbia Glacier, the second-largest tidewater glacier in North America, or take a guided river trip through historic Keystone Canyon past towering waterfalls. Matanuska Glacier DAY 6 Valdez2-DAY ADD-ON Wrangell-St. Elias Valdez is a premier fishing destination. Book a full or half-day charter or fish right from shore. National Park Have a relaxing meal at a local restaurant or pull into a picnic site to grill your own freshFor a great adventure in the largest catch of the day. Get acquainted with the city’s rich Gold Rush history by touring its historicalnational park in the country, take the museums and scenic trails.Edgerton Highway and McCarthy Roadturnoff for an exciting drive on a 93 DAY 7 Prince William Sound - Whittier - Anchoragemile (150 km) paved/gravel road to Ride the Alaska Marine Highway/ferry through Prince William Sound to Whittier. Drivethe old mining towns of McCarthy and through the longest combined vehicle-railroad tunnel in North America on your way backKennicott. Stay overnight. to Anchorage.
  25. 25. FairbanksThe Heartland Fairbanks to Anchorage Whether you fly into Alaska’s biggest cities or drive in through Tok, the road from Fairbanks to Anchorage is big on culture, history and scenic wonders.DAY 1 FairbanksAfter arriving in Fairbanks, the gateway to Alaskas Interior and the Arctic, rent a car orRV and visit the University of Alaska Museum of the North, one of the state’s top-10 visitorattractions. See musk ox, an ice-age survivor, and reindeer on a tour of the University’s LargeAnimal Research Station.DAY 2 FairbanksStart the morning with a riverboat cruise along the Chena or Tanana Rivers, lunch on the deckat a riverside restaurant and try your hand at gold panning on an afternoon gold mining tour.Stop for a view of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline on the Steese Highway.DAY 3 Fairbanks - DenaliEnjoy a 2-hour drive south to Denali National Park, home to Mt. McKinley, North America’s Anchoragetallest peak. Take a full-day guided tour to see sweeping landscapes and incredible wildlife.DAY 4 DenaliDenali National Park offers a variety of activities. Take a flightseeing tour via small plane orhelicopter or try a whitewater rafting excursion. Stay in the area for an evening program.DAY 5 Denali - TalkeetnaContinue south to the town of Talkeetna to see majestic views of Mt. McKinley. Experience aguided fishing trip or wildlife and scenic jet boat tour.DAY 6 Talkeetna - Eklutna - AnchorageEnjoy a scenic drive south to Eklutna Historical Park. Tour St. Nicholas Russian Church andview brightly painted “spirit houses.” Experience a canoe and bike excursion at Eklutna Lake orhike majestic Thunderbird Falls. Learn about local wildlife at the Eagle River Nature Centeror walk trails in the stunning gored valley. Continue to Anchorage to enjoy a meal of exquisitefresh seafood. (Wild Alaskan salmon is a local dining specialty.) Musk OxenDAY 7 AnchorageAnchorage, Alaska’s largest city, has world-class theater, a vital arts and culture scene, outdoor RAIL OPTIONmarkets, music in the park and 1,600 resident moose. Visit Lake Hood, the busiest float planeharbor in the world or fish for salmon in downtown Ship Creek. Try an award-winning brewpub Rather than traveling by car or RV,or see a baseball game under the midnight sun. take a scenic railway tour of Alaska from Fairbanks to Anchorage, stopping overnight in Denali and Talkeetna. Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  26. 26. JuneauThe Seafarer Lake Louise Coastal Cruise A cruise through the Inside Passage across the gulf through Prince William Sound lets visitors experience diverse landscapes, pristine waters and spectacular wildlife.DAY 1 Vancouver, BCSail away from Vancouver on one of many Alaska cruises. (This cruise can also be made fromAlaska to Vancouver.) The Seafarer The Inside Passage ExplorerDAY 2 Inside PassageAlaska’s coastline is one of the most scenic waterways in the world. You’ll experience wildlifeand wonder along Alaska’s Inside Passage as you make your way north to Alaska’s colorfulfrontier ports.DAY 3 KetchikanKnown as “Alaska’s First City,” Ketchikan is the first major community travelers come to asthey travel north. Founded as a fishing camp, Ketchikan is built on steep hillsides. Get anintroduction to the indigenous people of the area by visiting the Totem Heritage Center, TotemBight State Park or Saxman Native Village.DAY 4 JuneauPerched on a thin strip of land at the mouth of Gold Creek, Juneau is one of America’s mostbeautiful state capitals. The steep summits of Mt. Juneau and Mt. Roberts provide a gorgeousbackdrop. Juneau was once an integral part of Alaska’s Gold Rush.DAY 5 SkagwayThis “Gateway to the Klondike” saw countless fortune-seekers pass through during the heydayof Alaska’s Gold Rush. Today, you can still feel like a prospector among the rustic boardwalkswith frontier-style storefronts. Explore town and then take a 3-hour trip on the historic WhitePass & Yukon Route Railroad. Cruiseship Inside PassageDAY 6 Glacier Bay National ParkSpread across an impressive 3.2 million acres in southeast Alaska, this treasure trove of scenic 3-DAY ADD-ON Whittier/Seward -coastal islands, narrow fjords and abundant wildlife offers an inspirational glimpse of what Denali National Park -Mother Nature does best. The park is home to the highest concentration of tidewater glaciers Fairbankson the planet. From Whittier or Seward, take a scenic journey north on the Alaska Railroad. SeeDAY 7 College Fjords - Whittier/Seward Mt. McKinley on a guided tour of DenaliAfter crossing the Gulf of Alaska, glide into College Fjords where you will be surrounded by National Park and continue by train to16 ice-blue glaciers. Each was named for one of the Ivy League colleges by members of the Fairbanks, Alaska’s Golden Heart City.expedition that discovered them. Step off your cruise ship in Whittier or Seward. Stay andexplore the Kenai Peninsula or travel to Anchorage for a connecting land tour or fly home.
  27. 27. Totems, Ketchikan The Inside Passage Explorer Inside Passage Fly/Ferry Visitors looking for an unforgettable expedition discover Alaska by air and sea. DAY 1 Ketchikan Arrive in Ketchikan, Alaska’s first port of call, via air or Alaska ferry. Pick up a walking tour map and explore downtown attractions including historic Creek Street, Tongass Historical Museum, Southeast Alaska Discovery Center and unique local art galleries and shops. DAY 2 Ketchikan - Sitka Take an excursion boat or plane to the 2.3-million acre Misty Fiords National Monument with its majestic fjords or choose a half-day guided sport fishing trip. In the afternoon, fly to Sitka. DAY 3 Sitka Tour historic St. Michael’s Cathedral and the Russian Bishop’s House in what was once the Russian capital of Alaska. Take in Alaska Native artifacts at Sheldon Jackson Museum, totem poles and a cultural center at Sitka National Historical Park and view eagles and other birds of prey up-close at the Alaska Raptor Rehabilitation Center. Haines DAY 4 Sitka - Juneau Take the ferry or fly to Juneau, Alaska’s capital. Visit magnificent Mendenhall Glacier, 13 miles (20 km) from downtown, a rainforest botanical garden, a fish hatchery or ride the Mt. Roberts tramway. DAY 5 Juneau Pick from dozens of soft adventure tours like sea kayaking, rafting, glacier trekking or hike one of Juneau’s numerous trails. Visit shops and museums in the historic downtown area. DAY 6 Juneau - Haines Raptor Center, Sitka Enjoy a morning cruise on the Alaska Ferry to Haines. Discover historic Fort Seward on the shores of America’s longest fjord. In the afternoon, explore the Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve.3-DAY ADD-ON Wrangell and Petersburg Spend the night in Haines.After leaving Ketchikan, travel via ferry,jet or air taxi to the small communities of DAY 7 Haines - Skagway - JuneauWrangell and Petersburg. In Wrangell, take Get an early start and take the water taxi or ferry to Skagway, a browser’s paradise. Take inan exhilarating run up the Stikine River by the Gold Rush history on the “Scenic Railway of the World,” the railroad to the White Passjet boat or visit Petroglyph Beach to view summit. Return to Juneau via fast ferry or air taxi before departing.prehistoric rock carvings. In Petersburg, alsoknown as “Little Norway,” see traditionalNorwegian painted buildings and take anexcursion to LeConte Glacier. Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  28. 28. Far NorthWestern ArcticThe communities ofAlaska’s Far North areaccessible from Fair-banks or Anchoragevia jet or small aircraft.This is one of Alaska’smost diverse regions,filled with cultural op-portunities, wildlife and a landscape rang-ing from coastal plains to mountain ranges. WisemanNome offers a variety of ways to enjoythe Far North’s great outdoors. Accessibleby cruise ship and surrounded by tundra,Nome provides access to nearly 300 miles(482 km) of surrounding roads, wherevisitors can explore the countryside anddiscover pristine, untouched wilderness.While exploring the Seward Peninsulain the summer’s extended daylight hours,you’ll have a chance to discover wildflow-ers, moose, reindeer, caribou, musk ox,birds and seals. Nome offers excellent fish-ing for salmon, Arctic char and graylingand is known for great seafood including prospectors sifted $3 million in gold from Several archaeological sites near Gambellfresh crab and halibut. Nome’s sandy beaches. Today, visitors can are on the National Register of learn how to wield a gold pan, explore Historic Places.In town, the Carrie McLain Museum abandoned gold dredges and participate inhouses 14,000 historical photos and exhib- sled dog demonstrations. Visitors also shop Bird watchers from around the world travelits about Native culture, Eskimo art and for ivory carvings and crafts handmade by to the island in search of Asiatic spe-the Gold Rush. At the turn of the century, local Eskimos. cies rarely found in North America. As a special treat to visitors, on clear days the Nome’s most exciting annual event is the mountains of Russia are visible. conclusion of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The Last Great Race on Earth© Located 26 miles (42 km) above the is a 1,049 mile (1,688 km) race from Arctic Circle, Kotzebue is one of Alaska’s Anchorage to Nome. It begins on largest and oldest Iñupiat Eskimo villages. the first Saturday in March and As in many villages, Natives practice commemorates efforts to deliver traditional subsistence activities as well life-saving serum to Nome dur- as use modern technology. During the ing a diphtheria epidemic summer, this arctic village receives 36 in 1925. days of continuous daylight. Bird- watching is superb this time of year, St. Lawrence Island lies in so bring your binoculars. Millions the Bering Sea, 200 miles of migrating birds and waterfowl (321 km) west of Nome and arrive to nest in the thousands 38 miles (61 km) from of lakes on the tundra and river Russia. The island has been deltas. Surrounding national inhabited for several thousands parks offer hiking trails, and the of years, and its people are Kobuk, Noatak and Selawik rivers descendents of Siberian-Yupik are ideal for kayaking and rafting. Eskimos. St. Lawrence has two villages, Gambell and Savoonga, where Eskimos in both communities still preserveNative woman, Kotzebue traditional lifestyles.
  29. 29. Far North Region Travel Directory 48-49Arctic Coast Brooks RangeThe Iñupiat community of Barrow is the Thousands of caribou migrate throughnorthernmost settlement in America and the Brooks Range area each year. Theyone of the largest Eskimo communities. travel through millions of acres of wilder-As the seat of the 88,000 square-mile ness park lands in the Cape Krusenstern(227,919 square km) North Slope Bor- National Monument, Kobuk Valleyough, Barrow is also the world’s largest mu- National Park, Noatak National Pre-nicipality. This far north, the summer sun serve, Selawik National Wildlifedoesn’t set for 82 days, shining continually Refuge, Gates of the Arcticfrom May 10 to August 2. National Park and Preserve and the Arctic National WildlifeAcross from the Barrow airport lies the Refuge. Backpacking in these Arctic sled dogs are highly prizedWill Rogers and Wiley Post Monument isolated mountains or float-that commemorates the 1935 plane ing down the unspoiled riv-crash that killed both the American ers are unparalleled wilder-humorist and the famous pilot. Two ness experiences.other monuments to the famouspair, located at the crash From Fairbanks or Bettles, thesite 15 miles (24 km) south headquarters for many Alaskanof town, are on the National backcountry guides, visitors canRegister of Historic Places. fly to wilderness lodges scattered throughout the Brooks Range.Whaling and other subsistence activitiesstill play an important role in this arctic Another great Alaska experience is tocommunity. In fact, during April and May, drive the gravel Dalton Highway (Northvisitors can often watch as Eskimos head Slope Haul Road) to Deadhorse. Thisfor their whaling camps. 414 mile (666 km) road parallels the Explore gold rush history in Nome northernmost portion of the Trans-Barrow has several hotels, restaurants and Alaska Pipeline System. Few servicesother visitor services. There are shops are available, but wildlife is abundantfor visitors to purchase Eskimo clothing, and fishing for Arctic grayling ismasks, baskets and dolls. superb. For road conditions and public access restrictions, contact the AlaskaTwo hundred miles east of Barrow is Department of Transportation atPrudhoe Bay, home of the largest oil http://511.alaska.gov or (866) 282-7577.field in North America. The 800 mile(1,287 km) Trans-Alaska Pipeline Systemstarts here and ends in Valdez.Located 260 miles (418 km) northwest ofFairbanks in the central Brooks Range lies Learn Native whaling customs in Barrowthe village of Anaktuvuk Pass. This is thelast remaining settlement of the Nunamiutor inland northern Iñupiat Eskimo. Theirancestors, who date to 500 B.C., settledthe village in this area because it lies di- Monthly Temperature and Daylight Informationrectly on a caribou migration route. Average High Average LowThe local Simon Paneak Memorial Muse-um operates year-round, offering geologicalexhibits and Nunamiut cultural displays.Local crafts, such as caribou skin masks,are available for purchase.Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  30. 30. Southwest Kodiak Archipelago Kodiak is the principal town on Kodiak Island and the home of Alaska’s largest fishing fleet. Estab- lished as the first capital ofRussian America in 1792, reminders of thisera can be found at the Russian OrthodoxChurch and the Baranov Museum – for-merly a fur storehouse and Alaska’s oldestwooden structure.The original inhabitants of Kodiak werethe Alutiiq people – 7,000 years later theirdescendents still live on the island. Visitthe Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological BRISTOL BAYRepository in downtown Kodiak and geta glimpse into Alutiiq history and culture.Villages scattered throughout the archi-pelago offer insights into traditionalAlutiiq lifestyle.The Kodiak National Wildlife Refugecovers two-thirds of Kodiak Island, offeringprotected habitat for world-famous Kodiakbrown bears – the world’s largest land car-nivore. Visit the Refuge interpretive centerand catch a floatplane to backcountryviewing destinations. The Kodiak Island Archipelago offers a plethora of outdoor eruption of Novarupta Volcano. Lake recreation opportunities including hiking, Clark National Park and Preserve offers a fishing, kayaking, whale watching and wilderness of seacoast, mountains, glaciers bear viewing. and lakes filled with trophy-sized rainbow trout. Originally a WWII coastal fortification, Fort Abercrombie State Park was one of When visiting the first radar installations in Alaska. It Dillingham, be is now a national historic landmark sure to try your and provides a forest setting for day hand at landing hikes, picnics and camping. some of Alaska’s famous salmon or watch Bristol Bay for the area’s plentiful wildlife. Dillingham Scheduled air service from Anchor- is the gateway to the age to Dillingham, King Salmon and Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, Iliamna provide access to Bristol Bay’s Walrus Island State Game Sanctuary numerous fishing and outdoor recreation and Wood-Tikchik State Park – the largest opportunities. Many indigenous cultures state park in the U.S. also meet here including Yup’ik, Alutiiq and Athabascan. Lake Iliamna drains into Kvichak River drainage, an important habitat for red King Salmon is the gateway to Katmai salmon and possibly the largest contributor National Park and Preserve, an excellent to the Bristol Bay fishery. It is also the only place to view brown bears. Visitors can ex- state-designated trophy sport fishery. plore the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes,Visit historical sites in Unalaska a striking landscape created by the 1912
  31. 31. Southwest Region Travel Directory 50-52Alaska Peninsula Pribilof IslandsThe Alaska Peninsula reaches 550 miles Fly from Anchorage to see the world(885 km) into the Pacific Ocean. This geo- famous wildlife colonies on St. George andlogically active area is home to volcanoes St. Paul Islands in the Bering Sea. Moreand sea-carved coastlines, ancient Aleut than 240 bird species, including colorfulvillage sites and unparalleled wildlife view- puffins, have been seen on rock cliffs anding opportunities. grassy tundra. A nesting population of 2.5 million birds makes St. George the hostScheduled air service from ofthe largest known sea bird colony in theAnchorage to Cold Bay Western Hemisphere. St. Paul’sprovides access to an array of beaches also play host to annational wildlife refuges and amazing number of fur seals. Feel the Russian heritage in St. Paulnearby communities, includ-ing the Aniakchak National Settled by the Aleuts, theMonument and Preserve islands were used by Rus-and the Izembek National sian fur traders to harvestWildlife Refuge, an important seal pelts. The island’s Russianmigratory habitat for birds, ducks churches can be found on theand geese. Brown bear and other wildlife National Register of Historic Places.viewing opportunities are plentiful onthe peninsula. Yukon-Kuskokwim DeltaThe Alaska Marine Highway calls at the The waters of the Yukon and Kuskokwimcommunities of Chignik, Sand Point, King rivers flow through a vast, treeless plainCove, Cold Bay, False Pass and Akutan encompassed by the Yukon Delta Nationalas it travels along the peninsula between Wildlife Refuge. These expansive river Alaska’s legendary fishing in KodiakKodiak and Unalaska. drainages offer habitat for a wide array of birds and wildlife.Aleutian Islands Bethel, a port community on the Kusko-Past the tip of the Alaska Peninsula, the kwim River, is the commercial hub of theAleutian Islands begin their 1,000 mile area. A Yup’ik trading center in the 1870s,(1,609 km) sweep toward Asia. These in- Bethel remains a marketplace for ivorycredible windswept islands, now part of the carvings, baskets and other Native craftAlaska Maritime National Wildlife Ref- items. The Yup’ik Cultural Center fea-uge, were the theater for the 19-day battle tures Native exhibits and demonstrationsbetween Japanese and American troops in of dancing and carving. Bethel’s VisitorMay 1943. Center and Museum Annex offers exhibits of traditional Native tools and clothing,Visitors can reach Unalaska via air service a collection of vintage photos, Native artfrom Anchorage or Cold Bay or by tak- classes and a gift shop. With daily sched- Harbor at Kodiaking a summer ferry from Kodiak. Unalaska uled air service from Anchorage, Bethel iswas the early headquarters of the Russian easily accessible.American Company and center of the seaotter trade in the 1700s. The local fishingfleet holds the distinction of leading thenation in quantity and value of landed 27catch. Visitors enjoy exploring the Aleu- 21tians WWII Visitor Center and a network 16of bunkers and pillboxes. Local Unangan 10(Aleut) culture and history can be found at 4the Museum of the Aleutians. -1 -7 -12 -18 -23 -29Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  32. 32. Inside PassageSouthern RegionSome visitors begin theirAlaska adventure on thestate ferry system fromBellingham, Washington,or Prince Rupert, BritishColumbia, both of whichare accessible from the Yel-lowhead Highway.On the west coast of Annette Island, thetown of Metlakatla is accessible by air orstate ferry. The island is a federal reserva-tion for the Tsimshian Indians and long-term visits require a permit.Ketchikan is Alaska’s southernmost port ofcall for the majority of the Inside Passage,located within the heart of the TongassNational Forest. The multi-island commu-nity, surrounded by mountains and water,is served by daily jet service. Local muse-ums and attractions highlight the town’sheritage. Visitors can explore the historyof the area’s traditional Native culture,fishing and timber industries. Activitiesinclude camping, boating, a zip line and Four distinct groups of people shaped the ed waters of Prince of Wales Island.sport fishing excursions. Visitors will find history of Wrangell: Russians, the English, Located just 600 miles (965 km) northan array of shops and art galleries down- Americans and the Tlingit. While in town, of Seattle, fly or ferry to the third-largesttown and while strolling along the board- learn the area’s history by visiting Chief island in the U.S. Fish our pristine salt andwalks of historic Creek Street. Shakes Island & Tribal House or by ex- fresh waters for King salmon, halibut or ploring Petroglyph Beach State Historic steelhead. Hunt black bear or blacktailedFrom Ketchikan, travel by boat or plane Park and searching for prehistoric rock deer in the unspoiled terrain. Exploreinto Misty Fiords National Monument. carvings. The Wrangell Museum offers 1,500 miles (2,414 km) of roads or boatThe 2.3 million-acre glacially carved fjords interactive displays of Wrangell’s colorful around 990 miles (1,593 km) of shorelineshelter many species of land animals and history. When prospectors first came to the and outlying islands. Visitors enjoy kayak-sea life. area, they sought out the “gateway to ing, camping, whale and bird watching, the Stikine,” a river with exciting tours totem parks and fishing villages rich in of wildlife, glaciers and hot springs. Native culture. Visit Anan Bear and Wildlife Observatory for an up-close view of black and brown bears feasting on Northern Region wild salmon. In Sitka, the Russian capital of Alaska from 1808 to 1867, the New Petersburg residents celebrate their Archangel Dancers®, St. Norwegian culture with decorative Michael’s Cathedral and the Rus- rosemaling (traditional Norwegian sian Bishop’s House keep the painting) on houses and storefronts, Russian spirit alive. Experience and a rousing Little Norway Festi- Native culture at the Naa Kahidi val every May. Enjoy an excursion Dance show, Sheldon Jackson to LeConte Glacier, the southern- Museum, totem poles and Tlingit most active tidewater glacier in artist demonstrations at Sitka North America. National Historical Park and Southeast Alaska Indian Cul- Step back in time and experience tural Center, or view eagles at the the abundant wildlife, rugged Alaska Raptor Center. mountainous terrain and uncrowd-Sawyer Glacier, Tracy Arm Fjord
  33. 33. Inside Passage Region Travel Directory 53-61Juneau (pop. 31,187), Alaska’s capital and Known as the “Garden City of Alaska,”the gateway to Glacier Bay National Park, beauty abounds in the historic coastalis nestled between towering mountains and community.the tidewaters of Gastineau Channel. Thedowntown district is a lively mix of Yakutat, once a winter village for themodern architecture Tlingit Indians, offers excellent steelheadand quaint Victorian fishing. The village is your departure pointhomes. Popular for kayak and boat expeditionsattractions include to Hubbard Glacier and Russellthe St. Nicholas Russian Fjord. Flightseeing tours also takeOrthodox Church (1897), you to Malaspina Glacier, the larg-Macaulay Salmon Hatchery est glacier in North America. Tour Ketchikan’s scenic waterfrontand the famous Menden-hall Glacier. Located on Chichagof Island, Tenakee Springs has quietFlightsee over the magnifi- beaches and a rustic bathhousecent Juneau icefield, birthing fed by hot springs. There is excellent sportground to more than 40 glaciers or take fishing from Hoonah, Alaska’s largest Tlin-a scenic boat tour to Tracy Arm Fjord to git Indian settlement. This communityview birds, seals and whales. Near Juneau also hosts North America’s longest zip lineis Admiralty Island National Monument, at Icy Strait Point.home of the largest brown bear populationin Southeast Alaska. Angoon, a Tlingitvillage, shares the island with the high- Glacier Bayest concentration of nesting bald eagles Sixteen spectacular glaciers flow fromin North America. Visit Elfin Cove, once surrounding mountains into the waters of Watch whales, seals and shore birdsstrictly a commercial fishing village, now Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.home to 10 sport fishing lodges. Travel Departing from Bartlett Cove or Juneau,on to the rustic fishing town of Pelican enjoy a day trip, overnight cruise, flightsee-and walk its popular boardwalk or take a ing or a sea kayaking expedition ofcharter boat trip and see why the town is the area.known for being “closest to the fish.” Access the national park directly fromHaines hosts the Southeast Alaska State Gustavus, a 20-minute flight or three-hourFair every July. You can camp in sight of boat ride from Juneau. Accommodationstwo glaciers at Chilkat State Park. At are available at several locationsnearby Fort Seward, visit a former Army within town.hospital now used as a Native arts center.Up to 3,000 bald eagles congregate in theChilkat Bald Eagle Preserve during fall andwinter to feed upon spawning salmon. Visit the vintage streets of SkagwayHistory lives on in Skagway, Alaska’s firstincorporated city. Born of the KlondikeGold Rush of 1898, the town once teemedwith more than 20,000 prospectors ontheir quest for gold. Explore downtown, Average High Average Lowwhere the era’s history is preserved amongwooden boardwalks, restored historicbuildings and in nearby Dyea along the33 mile (53 km) Chilkoot Trail. Visit theKlondike Gold Rush National HistoricalPark or take an excursion on the narrowgauge White Pass & Yukon RouteRailroad – one of the world’s mostscenic mountain railways.Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  34. 34. Southcentral Anchorage Alaska’s largest city Anchorage (pop. 277,000), is a thriving metropolis. Surrounded Lake Louiseby wilderness and six mountain ranges,Anchorage boasts luxury hotels, delectablerestaurants, art galleries and specialtyshops. The city is also a vibrant arts andmusic scene featuring world-class dance, Hopetheater and Broadway performances. TheChugach Mountains provide a strikingbackdrop that can be viewed throughoutthe city and along 183 miles (294 km) oflocal trails.Anchorage is rich in history and culture.The Anchorage Museum at RasmusonCenter showcases an impressive collectiondepicting 10,000 years of Alaska history.Experience the state’s distinctive Nativeculture through storytelling, song anddance as you explore five traditional vil-lages at the Alaska Native Heritage Center. unexpected surprise at Ship Creek. The Three communities provide access toVisitors can enjoy a wide variety of wildlife city’s surrounding lakes and rivers are rich adventure via day cruises, charter boats,within Anchorage, including a resident with chum, sockeye, King, silver and flightseeing tours and the state ferry.moose population of 1,600! Guaranteed pink salmon.sightings take place at the Alaska Zoo, From Whittier, cruises and charters offerAlaska Wildlife Conservation Center and Take in the alpine scenery of Chugach access to some of Prince William Sound’sPotter Marsh. Enjoy the scenery along the State Park from Flattop Mountain, most spectacular sights. Sit in front of a11-mile (18 km) Tony Knowles Coastal Powerline Pass or the Eagle River Nature tidewater glacier, kayakTrail, accessible from downtown. Fishing Center. Learn about Russian and Na- a sheltered cove, tidefor salmon in downtown Anchorage is an tive Alaskan culture at the St. Nicho- pool or secluded beach. las Russian Church and view brightly Whittier offers a unique painted spirit houses at the Eklutna mixture of WWII Village Historical Park. Stop by Eklutna history and small Lake, a popular recreation site known for coastal town charm. its emerald-blue waters. Head south to Crow Creek Mine in Girdwood and pan Just outside Valdez, you for gold or enjoy the community’s shops can see the magnificent and restaurants. Take a ride up Alyeska Columbia Glacier, four Resort’s passenger tram for panoramic miles wide and more than views of mountains, glaciers and 200 feet high at the face. Turnagain Arm. Activities are abundant in Valdez throughout the year. You can also Prince William Sound enjoy glacier trekking, Prince William Sound encompasses kayaking, rafting, 10,000 square miles (25,900 square km) of skiing, snowmachin- protected waterways, islands, fjords, and ing, sightseeing, and tax-free shopping. 10,000 glaciers. The region is home to See towering waterfalls or visit the town’s whales, porpoise, sea otters, sea lions and museums. Experience colossal salmon runs seals. Bear, deer, mountain goats and sheep from shore or take a charter. inhabit the mainland.Take a relaxing walk to Exit Glacier
  35. 35. Southcentral Region Travel Directory 62-80Visitors from around the globe trek to Mat-Su ValleyCordova to amble across the Million Dol-lar Bridge, view glaciers, fish for salmon, Located approximately 45 miles (72 km)explore Orca Inlet and the Copper River north of Anchorage on the Glenn High-Delta, or see thousands of shorebirds at way National Scenic Byway, the Mata-Hartney Bay. nuska Valley is a fertile farmland settled by families from the Midwest as part of a New Deal relief program in 1935. TourThe Kenai Palmer to discover the history of theseThe Kenai Peninsula, just south of early “colonists” and see the legendary,Anchorage, is known as “Alaska’s gigantic vegetables at the Alaska StatePlayground.” Youll find spectacular Fair in August. Search for ghosts at Kennecott Minescenery, wildlife, rich culture andlegendary fishing. The Kenai In the neighboring Susitna Val-Mountains which span the ley, explore Wasilla, home of theChugach National Forest, Iditarod Trail Sled DogKachemak State Park, Ke- Race. Visitors cannai Fjords National Park learn from anand Kenai National Iditarod veteranWildlife Refuge, what it takes tocontain the easily complete the “Lastaccessible Exit Glacier Great Race” at the area’sand 433 miles (696 km) local dog kennels. A few milesof trails. Experience wild whitewater and west is Big Lake, a popular destination for boating and salmon fishing. Explore scenic Prince William Soundplacid scenic waterways, or paddle the 150miles (241 km) of canoe trails. Further north is Talkeetna – known as the Copper River Valley &Witness calving glaciers and marine wild- staging site for climbers as they begin theirlife on a sightseeing cruise in Seward, gate- trip up Mt. McKinley. Flightseeing tours Wrangell-St. Elias Nationalway to Kenai Fjords National Park. The of the mountain are a local specialty. On Park & PreserveAlaska SeaLife Center also offers up-close clear days, Denali State Park offers breath- taking vistas of Mt. McKinley, North The Copper River Valley is home to theviewing of marine mammals and sea birds. Copper River red salmon and Wrangell-From the highway enjoy the turquoise America’s highest peak. St. Elias National Park, the largest nation-color of the rivers and lakes surrounding al park in the United States. The valleyCooper Landing. Four species of salmon A 50-mile (80 km) scenic loop between the George Parks and Glenn Highways is a popular destination for backcountryspawn on the peninsula. Soldotna recreation, sport fishing, river rafting,boasts the world record King salmon takes you to Hatcher Pass and the Inde- pendence Mine State Historical Park. Visit hiking, glacier climbing, flightseeing and(97.4 lbs) and more than 3,700 feet of el- Native culture. Glennallen is the informa-evated Kenai River boardwalk. The central the park’s interpretive center and explore abandoned buildings and equipment in the tional hub of the region. Copper Centerpeninsula is home to four caribou herds, lies a few miles south of Glennallen, homeone near the city of Kenai, known for its old gold mines. to the visitor center for Wrangell-St. Elias.historic sites and cultural heritage. The historic mining towns of McCarthy and Kennicott lie at the heart of the park.A shoreline drive showcases four activevolcanoes across Cook Inlet, and at theend of the road, the Homer Spit extendsfive miles out to sea with breathtakingviews of mountains, glaciers and Kache-mak Bay. The gateway to Katmai NationalPark and the Alaska Maritime NationalWildlife Refuge, Homer offers unrivaledbear viewing, kayaking and birding.Tr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m
  36. 36. Interior Wiseman Alaska Highway You’ve been waiting to travel to Alaska and after a scenic journey north on the Alaska Highway, you’ve arrived in Tok. Take a day or two to relax and finalize your trip plans. Located between the Tanana River and the Alaska Range, Tok is a trade centerfor several Athabascan Native villages.Visit the Tok Public Lands InformationCenter for museum displays, a wildlifefilm and trip-planning information. TheTok Chamber of Commerce “Main StreetAlaska” Visitors Center also provides Limited Accessadvice for accessing local hiking, fishing,flightseeing and bicycling attractions.Take the Taylor Highway north to visit theGold Rush transportation center of Eagle Lake Louiseand park headquarters for the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. FromEagle, you can take a week long float tripdown the Yukon River to Circle or acruise to Dawson City in Canada’s visit the Big Delta State Historical Park, turn-of-the-century cabins, pioneer andYukon Territory. featuring vintage photographs, pioneer aviation museums and shops linked relics and Athabascan Native artifacts. by train.The Alaska Highway officially ends Nearby, Quartz Lake State Recreationin Delta Junction. From here you can Area offers camping, boating and fishing In July, attend Golden Days, an annualvisit glaciers, pick wild berries, fish for for rainbow trout and silver salmon. celebration of gold discovery or watch theArctic grayling or even observe a herd World Eskimo-Indian Olympics.of American bison at the Delta BisonRange. East of town, the Clearwater State Fairbanks No visit is complete without a stop at theRecreation Site offers fishing, camping and In 1902, Italian prospector Felix Pedro Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitorsboat access to the Tanana and Goodpaster discovered gold just north of Fairbanks, Center in downtown Fairbanks on theRivers. Travel nine miles north of Delta and with that came banks of the ChenaJunction on the Richardson Highway to thousands of River. Learn about the prospectors in search history and culture of the of the “mother lode.” area through informative More than a century displays. later, Fairbanks (pop. 31,321) continues As the midnight sun to thrive as the sets, so rises the aurora regional trade and borealis, providing a perfect transportation center and the gateway to backdrop for winter adventure – from dog Alaska’s vast Interior and Far North. sledding to cross-country and downhill skiing to snowmachining. Fairbanks hosts With more than 20 hours of the “midnight the Yukon Quest International Sled Dog sun” from mid-May through July, play a Race and the GCI Open North American round at the farthest north golf course Championship Sled Dog Race, as well as or wet a fly for Arctic grayling on a quiet an annual ice sculpting competition – the stream. Try your luck at gold panning or World Ice Art Championships. relax aboard a sternwheeler cruise on the Chena and Tanana Rivers. Experience Visit the University of Alaska Museum yesteryear at Pioneer Park, with authentic of the North with exhibits on Alaska’sMt. McKinley towers in the distance
  37. 37. Interior Region Travel Directory 81-89natural history, wildlife and Native culture, Wonder Lake, Savage River, Polychromeand explore the Rose Berry Alaska Art Pass, the Outer Range, Sanctuary River,Gallery. Muldrow Glacier and the Kantishna mining district. While traveling by bus,The nearby community of North Pole, visitors have an opportunity to see caribou,“where the spirit of Christmas lives year- grizzly bears, wolves, moose, Dall sheep,round,” receives and answers thousands lynx, marmots, fox and snowshoe hares.of letters to Santa each year. Visit the Many of the park’s birds visit during theTrans-Alaska Pipeline System and natural summer months, but year-round residentsmineral hot springs nearby. include ravens, great horned owls and three species of ptarmigan.A fly-in excursion toFort Yukon on the Arctic The Eielson Visitor Center is Drying salmon at an Athabascan fish campCircle will give you a located 66 miles (106 km) intopicture of life on the the park and is a great placeYukon River in Alaska’s to learn about the culturallargest Athabascan and natural resources of thevillage. The Dinji area. The facility is also aZhuu Enjit Museum has model of environmentallyexcellent examples of sensitive construction andold and new beadwork sustainable design. Withcreated by the Gwich’in both indoor and outdoorAthabascans. viewing areas, new exhibits and interior eating andTraveling south from interpretive program space,Fairbanks, stop by the town of Nenana, a stop at the center will greatly enhancewhich lies on the banks of the Tanana and your experience while in the park. The Gold Rush brought sternwheelersNenana Rivers. Visitors can explore St.Marks Mission Church, originally built To the southeast of the national park,in 1905. The pews are embellished with visit Denali State Park for its famoushandmade carvings, and the altar cloth is panoramic views of Mt. McKinley and themade of moosehide decorated with Native Alaska Range. The Denali Highway takesbeadwork. Also available for exploration you just south of the Alaska Range, fromis Nenana’s railroad depot, which can Cantwell at the edge of Denali Nationalbe found on the National Register of Park to Paxson. Just east of Paxson lies theHistoric Places. Gulkana River, where spawning salmon can be seen from mid- to late summer. These salmon are protected, but the regionMt. McKinley & Denali National offers other excellent fishing opportunitiesPark and Preserve for trout and grayling.From Nenana, continue south to Mt. Winter brings ice sculpting contests, FairbanksMcKinley and Denali National Park andPreserve. Denali is the Athabascan namefor Mt. McKinley, meaning “the greatone.” The area offers hotels, campgrounds Monthly Temperature and Daylight Informationand many other visitor services. Average High Average LowRecreational opportunities include hiking,rock and ice climbing, photography,wildlife viewing, nature walks, horsebacktreks and river excursions.Shuttle bus service and guided tours intothe park’s wilderness are offered, as privatevehicles are not permitted within theNational Park. The 91 mile (146 km)road traverses the park offering views ofTr a v e l A l a s k a . c o m

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