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TiE Bangalore UNDP Energy programme and Enterpreneurship

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A Talk by Dr. S.N. Srinivas on on some of the project initiatives at UNDP, their implications to policy making, opportunities it has created/ can create for entrepreneurs.

A Talk by Dr. S.N. Srinivas on on some of the project initiatives at UNDP, their implications to policy making, opportunities it has created/ can create for entrepreneurs.

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  • 1. UNDP’s Energy Programme and Entrepreneurship By S N Srinivas on 8 January 2014 at Bangalore United Nations Development Programme, India Lasting Solutions for Development Challenges 1
  • 2. CONTENT  Background of UNDP’s responses to energy  Few case examples of UNDP’s energy projects under ◦ Renewable Energy, ◦ Energy Access and ◦ Energy Efficiency 2
  • 3. UNDP’S RESPONSE TO ENERGY ISSUES 3
  • 4. The Eight Goals  Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger  Achieve universal primary education  Promote gender equality & empower women  Reduce child mortality  Improve maternal health Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases Ensure environmental sustainability Develop a global partnership for development    4
  • 5. Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programs; reverse loss of environmental resources.  Reduce biodiversity loss, achieving, by 2010, a significant reduction in the rate of loss.  Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation (for more information see the entry on water supply).  By 2020, to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum-dwellers 5 
  • 6. SUSTAINABLE ENERGY FOR ALL AN INITIATIVE OF THE UN SECRETARY GENERAL Providing universal access to modern energy services;  Doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; and  Doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. 
  • 7. VISION AND ULTIMATE GOALS  Under the leadership of the Government of India, the aim of the 2013-2017 Country Programme Action Plan (CPAP) is to support the Government’s efforts to promote rapid, inclusive sustainable growth that benefits the most excluded through partnerships with Ministries, institutions and civil society.  The CPAP aims to improve development objectives for poor and vulnerable populations in the nine UNDAF focus states: Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh.
  • 8. Almost One Third (32.1 percent) of Indian households live without electricity Source: NFHS 3 8
  • 9. India: Sustainable Development  India emits 4.6% of the world carbon dioxide. It is the 4th largest emitter in the world Carbon footprint of one Indian: 1.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide  It would take about 17 Indians to emit as much as one American (20.6 tonnes)  29.4% of India’s energy is sourced from Biomass 9
  • 10. CASE EXAMPLES OF UNDP-INDIA PROGRAMME 10
  • 11. UNDP’s Responses - Promotes Energy Efficiency, Energy Access and renewable and alternate energy sources  Energy efficiency in tea processing units [completed in July 2013]  ◦ Removal of barriers for biomass power in India [ongoing], 5.75 million USD, total 32 million USD Removal of barriers to energy efficiency in steel rerolling mill [completed on 31 Dec 2013]  ◦ Market development for Solar Water Heater [just completed] Upscaling energy efficient production in small scale steel industries  ◦ Market development for Concentrating Solar Heat [ongoing]  Biomass energy ◦ Biomass Energy for Rural India [completed], 4 million USD, total 8 million USD  Energy Efficiency in Indian Railways  Energy efficiency in commercial buildings Solar energy ◦ Market development for Solar PV products [under preparation]  Access to clean energy  Coal Bed Methane  Scale Up of Access to Clean Energy for Rural Productive and Domestic Uses  Biomethanation  Micro hydro development 11
  • 12. RENEWABLE ENERGY 12
  • 13. Biomass Power       Potential based on available biomass including cogeneration is about 20,000 MW More than 50% of cogeneration is already exploited Only about 2000 MW of biomass power plants are installed Most of these are combustion based, capacities exceeding 5 MW Niche exists for few 100 kW to 2 MW. These have advantages of not disturbing biomass flows greatly UNDP has supported now two such projects ◦ Biomass Energy for Rural India – at panchayat level, with energy plantations and biomass power generation, evacuation of power to grid ◦ Ankur biomass power, Sankheda Gujrat – Open access power sale, 13
  • 14. BERI Performance Guarantee expected •1.25 kWh/kg of biomass •95% of rated load •300 kW of continuous operation Performance achieved Parameter Details Gasifier operation 1035 h Engine Operation 1022 h Grid Synchronisation 951 h Total biomass consumption 111 t Average biomass consumption 107 kg/h Moisture content of biomass 15% or less Specific Energy Consumption (calorific value 15 MJ/kg) 1.36 kg/kWh Best recorded SEC 1.2 kg/kWh Total energy generated 80,600 kWh Net energy exported to grid 56,500 kWh Average load factor 85 kWe Peaking load factor 100 kWe Rated Capacity of Engine 120 kWe Overall efficiency biomass to electricity 18% Overall efficiency producer gas to electricity 25% Cold gas efficiency 77% Estimated efficiency for 500 kWe 25 to 30% PLANT LOAD FACTOR OF 68% ACHIEVED
  • 15. BERI – LEARNING  Biomass supply:  3000 acres of plantations developed, 1/3rd on panchayat, 1/3rd on forest department land and 1/3rd farm forestry.  Expected yield was 12,000 tons per year, assessed yield is 5,000 tons per year  Protection? Nutrients?  11 kV grid line a must for evacuation to run such systems – project lost 2 years but a very important lesson  Load shift mechanism and catering to rural loads can help improve economics, can help increase PLF, local ownership – could not be demonstrated  Huge gap in generation cost and sale revenue: tariff given by BESCOM was 2.85 Rs/kWh [14 year binding at 5% annual escalation]. Production cost was 8.85 Rs per kWh. Project supported operation till 31 Dec 2012 and then handed over to GoK. It is in halt now  Is exploring commercial and market based loads better than DISCOMs tariff based purchase?  Should regulatory/policy instruments be more flexible?
  • 16. BERI – POTENTIAL  India has 230,000 grama panchayats. Each require about 250 kW power.  When run at even 65% PLF which project has demonstrated  A typical biomass enterprise of 250 kW can  generate 1.5 million units  generate about Rs 1.2 Crore turnover a small scale enterprise  employ AT LEAST 12 jobs on continuous basis. Thus it can provide 230,000 rural enterprises and about 2.76 million direct jobs  300 acres of land is required for energy plantation to run 250 kW plant at modest yield of 10 tons per acre per year  Reduce greenhouse gas emissions  57,500 MW of power production potential  Energy plantation required would be 69 million acres [we have wasteland of about 150 million acres]  Above numbers are for discussions and not to quote
  • 17.  Overall, the project was unique in three respects. ◦ First is that the project ensured supply of biomass resources through a dedicated plantation to run a 1 MW cumulative biomass gasifier plants on a continuous basis. ◦ Second, it strengthened grid interaction at the tail end with continuous power supply to the 11-kV sub-megawatt plant located in the villages. And ◦ third, the project established operational benchmarks for sub-megawatt biomass-based gasifier plants on the field.  One of the major take away is also the conditions under which such plants can sustain - tariff offered to the electricity by the DISCOMs should be sufficient, in case of BERI the tariff offered was Rs 2.85 per kWh whereas the cost of power production is Rs 8 plus per kWh  an urgent need for tariff revision – more so for sub-megawatt scale.  This book offers valuable insight and lessons for development professionals, policy makers, researchers, and students on the implementation and management of renewable energy-based sub-megawatt power projects in rural areas.  Web: http:/bionergyindia.kar.nic.in/aboutus.htm and United Nations Development Programme; Energy and Environment Unit; 55 Lodhi Estate, New Delhi-110 003; Web: http:/www.in.undp.org : Email: info.in@undp.org .  The book is available at: http://www.in.undp.org/content/dam/india/docs/EnE/bioenergy-for-rural-india--demonstration-of-decentralized-sub-m.pdf  and you can also find a A/V in the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uooyODT69OA 17
  • 18. 1.2 MW biomass gasifier based power plant, Sankheda, Gujarat  Ankur Scientific Pvt. Ltd to set up 1.2 MWe capacity biomass gasifier based grid connected power plant with approximate investment of Rs 7 Crore  Sell power to M/s Aditya Birla Insulators (a unit of Aditya Birla Nuvo Ltd) plant located at Meghasar, Halol block in Panchmahal district of Gujarat through open access  Revenue is 5.25 Rs/kWh plus REC benefits of 1.5 Rs/kWh.  The plant has shown PLF of 65%
  • 19. 1.2 MW biomass gasifier based power plant, Sankheda, Gujurat
  • 20. POTENTIAL India has deficit in woody biomass, but has surplus in agriculture residue.  These residues can be potential sources to provide green power to many such enterprises, especially the semi urban settings  There are over 5 million enterprises that require energy  20
  • 21. SOLAR 21
  • 22. Accelerating installation of Solar Water Heaters  Annual penetration rate of Solar Water Heaters (SWHs) was tripled from 2.55 million sq. m. in baseline year of the project 2009 to 7.01 million sq. m. as of March 2013 [added 4.46 million sq. m. ] 1200000 1000000 800000 600000 400000 200000 0 22
  • 23. SWH – ESCO, perhaps for the first time   An ESCO [Aspiration energy] installed 4,200 sq. m. collector area of SWH systems at Wheels India Pvt. Ltd., a passenger car plant that reduces use of furnace oil for hot water in the degreasing process. It has resulted in saving 383 liters of furnace oil a day or close to 115,000 liters annually. Another auto parts company, Sona Koya Steering Systems installed 1333 sq. m. collector area of SWH systems in 2012 also operated by the ESCO that supplements use of furnace oil for their pressured water heating systems. It has resulted in saving 120 liters of furnace oil a day or 36,000 liters annually. 23
  • 24. Region wise potential for SWHs  Three testing facilities are operational ◦ Solar Energy Center, Gurgaon; ◦ Regional Test Center, University of Pune & ◦ Regional Test Center, Hamirpur. ◦ The facility is open to the manufacturers to test their SWH system/ components for complying with the ‘minimum efficiency specifications’ (for ETCs) and BIS standards for FPCs systems. 24
  • 25. Sector-wise SWH potential CDM project registered for SWH systems, earnings from carbon credits will be used for after sales service and performance guarantee for lifetime of the system 30 awareness programmes were held across the country where 1000 people participated has mobilised Detailed Project Reports (DPRs) for 134 SWH systems and installations with a total capacity of 1,537,000 liters per day [30,000 sq.m.] 25
  • 26. Knowledge Products  A dedicated web site www.solarwaterheater.gov.in, provides FAQs on SWHs, user’s handbook, links to the company websites of accredited manufacturers, information on existing subsidy and policy serving as an information portal. ◦ Training manuals have been prepared for installers in 9 different Indian languages for installation and trouble shooting of SWH systems. ◦ Case studies, consultant guides and market studies of 5 different sectors of Himalayan region, Delhi & NCR region, domestic, industrial and commercial have been developed.  Significant energy savings and GHG reductions ◦ 3.57 MU [Million Units] of electricity saved in the project duration translates to GHG reduction of 1.66 million tCO2. 26
  • 27. Looking to the future  Enabling an energy labeling system initiated by the project is approved to ensure best quality products  Setting up of a system by MNRE for M&V [Measurements and Verification], information collection and performance monitoring of new SWH installations  Building state and municipal-level capacities to achieve and manage acceleration of SWH use and meet the targets set for Phase II of JNNSM  Training to increase the number of semi-skilled and skilled workers needed for installations, after sales maintenance and trouble shooting of SWH systems  Strengthening market mechanisms through ESCO models  Including SWH under the solar specific Renewable Purchase Obligation (RPO) for industrial consumers  Widespread use of a prototype of a low cost, portable SWH system that is currently being tested in hilly regions  Realising the potential of energy saving and GHG reductions: of installations made during the project period has potential to save 27.9 MU of electricity translating to 24.9 tCO 2 in the 15 year life time of the Solar Water Heating systems.  A target of 20 million square meters of collector area of SWH systems as per the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) by 2022 is to be realized by. 27
  • 28. INDIA-CSH PROJECT BASELINE  LOW PENETRATION LEVELS WITH ANNUAL INSTALLATIONS AT 2000 SQ. M  IN 2010, 71 INSTALLATIONS WITH CUMULATIVE 20,000 SQ. M  NO PERFORMANCE STANDARDS EXIST FOR COMMERCIAL CSH SYSTEMS IN MARKET  PAYBACK ON INVESTMENTS ARE 7 TO 9 YEARS PROJECT OBJECTIVE  INCREASE ANNUAL INSTALLATIONS TO 15000 SQ. M PER YEAR BY END OF PROJECT  ADD 45000 SQ. M OF CSH INSTALLATION THROUGH 30 DEMONSTARTION & 60 REPLICATION PILOTS (AVG. 500 SQ. M)  REDUCE PAYBACK PERIOD TO 5 YEARS WITH INCENTIVES & SUITABLE FINANCING  ESTABLISH PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, TEST PROCEDURES & PROTOCOLS FOR CSH TECHNOLOGIES
  • 29. CST Installation status Total Number of Systems Steam Cooking Systems 144 121 Solar Cooling 8 Process Heat & Laundry Applications 15 Installed as on 31st March, 2013 Under Execuation Type of CST Collector 28000 (approx.) 23 Nos. with 8100 sq. m. Collector Area m2 Schfeller Dish 23000 m2 Paraboloid/ Arun Dish (Moving Focus) 2470 m2 Parabolic Trough 1000 m2 Non Imaging/ LFR 1500 m2 Yearly Average Installations 5000 sq. m.(20 Nos.)
  • 30. 30
  • 31. PILOT DEMONSTARTION OF CSH TECHNOLOGIES  30 DEMONSTARTION PROJECTS TO BE SUPPORTED DEMONSTRATION OF CSH TECHNOLOGIES FOR PROCESS HEAT IN KEY SECTORS –          DAIRY PROCESSING UNITS HOTEL INDUSTRY HOSPITALS TEXTILE UNITS PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMICAL METAL TREATMENT FOOD PROCESSING INSTITUTIONAL COOKING
  • 32. PILOT DEMONSTARTION OF CSH TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT SUPPORT FOR DEMONSRATION PROJECTS  TO CONDUCT FEASIBILITY STUDY UPTO USD 2000  PREPARATION OF DETAILED PROJECT REPORTS UPTO USD 8000  PROJECT SUPPORT UPTO 10% OF THE COSTS (NOT EXCEEDING USD 20,000) IN ADDITION TO MNRE SUBSIDY  TECHNICAL TRAINING FOR 2 PERSONS IN O&M PER UNIT SITE  POST COMMISSIONING PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION STUDIES
  • 33. PILOT DEMONSTARTION OF CSH TECHNOLOGIES OBLIGATIONS UNDER DEMONSRATION SUPPORT (IN FORCE FOR 2 YEARS FROM THE PERIOD OF COMMISSIONG)  DEMO SITE MUST PROVIDE PERFORMANCE DATA  AGREE FOR VISITS BY PROJECT STAFF FOR PERFORMANCE MONITORING  AGREE TO PROVIDE DATA FOR CASE STUDY MATERIAL  ALLOW ACCESS TO SITE FOR DESIGNATED PERSONNEL FOR DEMONSTRATING OPERATING SYSTEMS
  • 34. PURPOSE OF AWARENESS WORKSHOPS FOR VARIOUS SECTORS  SHOWCASE THE USE OF CSH SYSTEMS FOR RELEVANT PROCESS HEAT APPLICATIONS IN TARGETED SECTORS  MANUFACTURERS DEMONSTARTE THE USE OF THEIR SYSTEMS IN FIELD AND SERVICES OFFERED  END USERS EXPERIENCES – INTEGRATION, O&M OF SYSTEMS, FINANCIAL FEASIBILITY, PAYBACK PERIODS  PRSENT A CONCISE COST-BENEFIT DETAIL WHICH ACCOUNTS FOR (1) CAPITAL COST, (2) COST WITH MNRE SUBSIDY, (3) COST WITH MNRE
  • 35. PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR CSH SYSTEMS  TO ENSURE QUALITY MANUFACTURING OF CSH SYSTEMS IN INDIA, PROJECT ACTIVITES INCLUDE SETTING UP OF PERFORMANCE TESTING STANDARDS, TEST PROCEDURES AND TEST PROTOCOLS FOR THE 5 CSH SYSTEMS  A NATIONAL & REGIONAL TEST CENTER TO BE SET UP WITH STANDARD TESTING INSTUMENTS FOR PEFFORMANCE TESTING OF CSH TECHNOLOGIES & APPLICATIONS
  • 36. ENERGY EFFICIENCY
  • 37. Energy efficiency in steel rerolling mills  34 model units have proved techno-economic and environmental benefits of energy efficiency ◦ Reduced energy consumption by 25 to 30%  [45 to 35 liters FO per ton of steel, 90-100 to 60-70 kg coal per ton of steel in re-heating furnace and 100 to 80 kWh per ton of steel in rolling mills] ◦ Reduced about 1500 to 2000 tCO2 per year ◦ Approximate investment is about Rs 2 crore ◦ Approximate returns is about Rs 1 to 1.5 crore per year on account of reduction in energy consumption ◦ In addition, productivity increase, reduction in burning losses, etc. ◦ Direct rolling has much higher benefits, saves over 50% of energy, completely avoids need of a re-heating furnace, prevents pollution thereoff  Investment plans for 40 pipeline units provided  We understand nearly 166 of the 300 surveyed units have incorporated energy efficiency through influence of project With the above confidence, it is aimed to scale up the interventions about 300, provide catalytic support to interested SRRM, draw lessons for balance 1800 to follow
  • 38. Proposed technology packages
  • 39. WORLD STEEL SCENARIO - 2010  World Steel Production – 1,414 million tonnes (15% increase yoy)  Steel Production in China – 626.7 million tonnes OTHER S, 43.2% CHINA, 44.3% (9.3% increase yoy)  Steel Production in Japan – 109.6 million tonnes (25.2% increase yoy)  Steel Production in India – 66.8 million tonnes (6.4% increase yoy) INDIA, 4.7% JAPAN, 7.8%  Presently India is fifth largest steel producer. Expected to be second largest by 2015-2016 INDIA – finished steel production Finished steel production in 2009-10 60.8 million tonnes per year Flat steel production 31.49 million tonnes Non Flat steel production 29.19 million tonnes Contribution of SRRM sector 19.54 million tonnes (67.63% of total non flat production in India)
  • 40. PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM OF SRRM Oil Fired Local Sources Gas Fired Coal Fired Thermal Energy Pencil Ingots Reheating Furnace Billets / Blooms Local Sources Steel Plants Electrical Energy Roughing Mill Intermediate Mill Finishing Mill Dispatch Bundling Manual Cooling Bed
  • 41. Project Strategies Technical and Financial Support FINANCIAL SUPPORT TECHNICAL SUPPORT • • • • • • • • • Identifying existing problems Technical support by Project Expert Team Design Meeting with Consultants Performance Improvement Trainings for Ùnits Electrical Energy Audit. Development of SOPs & SMPs. Evaluation of existing Roll Pass Designs Implementation of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 Implementation of 5 S-Lean Manufacturing MODEL UNIT • Capital Subsidy of 25% investment subject to max of Rs. 30.0 Lakhs for Low End Technology and Rs 75.0. Lakhs for High End Technologies. • Reimbursement of the cost of consultancy upto a maximum of Rs. 5,00,000 SUPPORT FOR THE SECTOR THROUGH SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS • Awareness / Technical workshops and seminars • Workshops on Standard Operating and Maintenance Practices (SOP & SMP) • Development of Feasibility Reports for Pipe Line Units • Cost Analysis Benefit Study • Replication Study • Capacity Building Programs for Stakeholders • Strengthening of Institutional Arrangement for the Sector • Awareness Trainings • Training of Trainers • Trainings for Foreman • Life Cycle Analysis
  • 42. The focus 1. 2. 3. Up-scaling Energy Efficiency interventions in about 300 SRRM Piloting EE measures in Induction furnaces Trialing second generation of technology packages in SRRM
  • 43. PROJECT DETAILS Implementing partner: UNDP Budget [in USD]: UNDP 950,000 AusAid 675,000 Ministry of Steel 2,000,000 Total 3,625,000 Leverages 40 million USD from private investments [beneficiary industrial units] Duration: Jun 2013-Dec 2014 Geographical Focus Steel Rerolling Mill [Mandi Gobindgarh, Jaipur, Coimbatore,Chennai etc.] and Induction furnace [Raipur, Mandi Gobindgarh, Bhiwadi, Muzaffarnagar etc.] clusters across India
  • 44. PILOTING EE MEASURES IN INDUCTIONFURNACE 1000 Induction Furnaces exist in India, most common size is 8 to 15 Tons Per Hour Electricity is used as energy to melt scrap and the average consumption is 720 kWh per ton Scope exists for at least 10% energy reduction i.e. SFC can be reduced to 620 kWh per ton of scrap. Identified technology options – provisional     ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Scrap processing can improve energy performance leading to 30 to 40 kWh per ton, Pre-heating scrap can reduce 90 kWh per ton of scrap melt Integrated digital system can improve energy performance – estimated to reduce 50 to 60 kWh per ton of steel. Training of workers as is key area for improvement by the association Radical change in energy performance is possible by using high temperature oxygen gasification for scrap melting. The current useful energy is only 8%. Technology packages will be detailed out and expression of interest will be sought from interested units to pilot
  • 45. Making the information and knowledge products available 1. UNDP website project page developed: http://www.in.undp.org/content/india/en/home/operations/p rojects/environment_and_energy/ongoingprojects/upscaling-energy-efficient-production-in-smallscale-steel-indus 2. E-network launched [steel.india@undp.org ] – a network set up to update on EE and inform about project events to steel sector stakeholders 3. Technologies demonstrated in SRRM are available on youtube ◦ Steel film (overview, consolidated): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPtk5SXS7KQ ◦ All related films are on http://www.youtube.com/user/ADCSFilms ◦ Direct rolling http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIXkQYo2jSA
  • 46. Summary of technical assistance offered 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.  Baseline energy performance report Customized recommendation on Energy Efficient Technology Options Technical assistance in implementation Post implementation energy performance report Training of shop floor level workers Training on best practices (like 5S) Recognition to participating units in the drive for energy efficient production ◦ It is proposed to recognize the contribution of all participating units in the national drive to adopt energy efficiency. The recognition will be in the form of ‘certificate’ acknowledging implementing energy efficient technologies. This recognition will be jointly come from Ministry of Steel, Government of India & UNDP.
  • 47. Financial package Applicability Group-1 A Group-1 B Group-2 Group-3 Group-4 A Group-4 B Group-5 SRRM – low end technology SRRM – low end technology Target Area No. of Units Targeted Financial Incentive Financial Incentive Max. per Unit, Lakh Rs Pan India 130 20% 2 260 Pan India 50 Consultanc y 2 100 50 Consultanc y 2 100 50 Consultanc y 5 250 5 20% 40 200 5 50 20 100 Bhavnagar/Indore/ SRRM – low end Mandi technology-Mini Gobindgarh/ Scrap Based Mills Palakkad SRRM – high end technology-Direct Pan India rolling Induction Furnace To be selected (Model) Induction Furnace To be selected (Pipeline) SRRM-New Generation Pan India Technologies 10 5 20% Total Lakh Rs
  • 48. In summary Steel re-rolling mills (SRRMs) constitute an important link in the overall supply chain of steel in the country, supplying a majority of India’s long steel products. The direct energy-use in the SRRM sector includes heating fuels (furnace oil, natural gas, and coal) and electrical energy. Steel industry consumes 10% of total energy consumed in India and SRRMs consume 11% of the energy consumed in steel sector. The cost of energy in SRRM is estimated at 25%–30% of the overall production cost. The Energy Efficiency interventions brought energy savings of 25 to 45% reduction. In summary, every SRRM invested about Rs 1.5 to 2 Crore [a one time investment lasts for 10 to 20 years] and the cost of fuel saved exceeds Rs 1 crore annually. This ‘process document’ details out story of how technology interventions were made in SRRMs. I along with two others are the editors of the book Energy-Efficient Steel Re-rolling: How a pioneering project is transforming the Indian secondary steel sector. The above book is available at: http://in.one.un.org/img/uploads/STEEL_BOOK_Low_res_for_upload.pdf A video is also available on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIXkQYo2jSA 48
  • 49. join us in in the Join us in scaling up THANK YOU 2000 1000 national drive on energy efficient steel production 1890 30 300 0 1 2 3 S N Srinivas, PhD Programme Officer (E nergy for Development) United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) No. 55, Lodi E ate st New Delhi – 110 003 Tel: 011- 4653 2251 (Direct) Fax: 011- 2462 7612 E -mail: sn.srinivas@ undp.org Website: www.in.undp.org
  • 50. ENERGY ACCESS
  • 51. Energy Access   In India, 400 million people are without electricity.This translates to lesser opportunities for better standard of living and even lesser opportunities for entrepreneurship. MNRE and UNDP to encourage entrepreneurship in these energy deficient rural and peri-urban locales supported different business models. These are available at: http://www.in.undp.org/content/india/en/home/ourwork/environme ntandenergy/videos/renewable-energy-entrepreneurship-fordevelopment.html 51
  • 52. 1. Scale Up of Access to Clean Energy for Rural Productive and Domestic Uses 5-year project envisaged at three levels  Pilot districts – technology packages, institutional mechanisms (district level committees) - about 3 districts per state for three states ◦ Targetted at 30 unserved and 30 under-served villages (Assam or Meghalaya, Madhya Pradesh, and Orissa or Jharkhand) ◦ Would supply thermal, electrical and mechanical energy needs; focus on energy needs for domestic, irrigation, cooking and other economic activities including commercial energy needs ◦ Validation of technology packages, business models, district level committees..  State-level (3-5 states) ◦ State Action Plans for Access to Clean energy ◦ Train 500 entrepreneurs, and develop 25 nos. Renewable Energy Service Companies [RESCOs] for implementation and dissemination. ◦ Aims to improve productivity of 4,000 farmers through reliable irrigation . Expects to extend some means of livelihoods to about 3000 individuals.  National level ◦ Coordination through Global Energy Access Centre (GEAC) ◦ Standards, testing and certification 1/10/2014 GKSPL /AIREC inception presentation 52
  • 53. Project Components (as per PIF) Investment financing for rural energy technology enterprises, and for end-users that promote productive applications (GEF grant: US $1.6 million)  Policy and institutional support for the promotion of access to modern and clean energy services (GEF grant: US $ 0.35 million)  Scale up and replicate access to clean and modern energy services in unserved and under served regions (GEF grant: US $ 1.2 million)  Awareness and Institutional capacity development (GEF grant: US $ 0.68 million)  1/10/2014 GKSPL /AIREC inception presentation 53
  • 54. Key stakeholders MNRE Executing partner, policy (national) UNDP GEF agency State governments, SNAs Planning & Policy (state level) District level agencies Planning, co-ordination, overseeing the implementation, PSUs, Private sector Financing through CSR, technical and implementation support where possible NABARD, KVIC, IREDA, Banks, FIs, MFIs Financing NGOs, CBOs, social enterprises Implementation, community engagement Energy enterprises Manufacturer, Technology & service provider, 1/10/2014 GKSPL /AIREC inception presentation 54
  • 55. Schedule of consultations / workshops Venue Date Focal participants Nodal person Bhubhan eshwar Jan 17 Local users, entrepreneurs, NGOs, govt Rekha Krishnan/ Sameer Maithel/ S P Gonchaudhuri Bhopal Jan 21 Local users, entrepreneurs, NGOs, govt Rekha Krishnan/ Sameer Maithel/ S P Gonchaudhuri Guwahati Jan 24 Local users, entrepreneurs, NGOs, govt Sameer Maithel / Rekha Krishnan Chennai Feb 12 Suppliers, project developers Hemant Lamba / Sameer Maithel /Rekha Krishnan Delhi Feb 14 Financiers Delhi Feb 17- LFA 18 Sameer Maithel / Rekha Krishnan Delhi Feb 28 Sameer Maithel / Rekha Krishnan N K Joshi / Rekha Krishnan / Sameer Maithel Summary of workshops 1/10/2014 GKSPL /AIREC inception presentation 55
  • 56. 2. Increasing access to Renewable Energy for Micro enterprises in Rural India MNRE UNDP Deal er PMU TST A LSP 100 Rural Micro enterprises Dealer Support Agency Dea ler
  • 57. 3. Work with Members of Parliament        Promotion of RE based Power Generation in OffGrid Areas 3.1 Access to electricity for all gets legal backing 3.2 Role of RE in providing access to electricity in off-grid rural areas 3.3 Options of electrification in off-grid areas 3.4 Estimate of the number of off-grid villages and hamlets at the aggregate National level 3.5 Estimate of electricity generation necessary to provide sustenance electricity per household in 11438 villages 3.6 Approaches to Fill the Gap Between Retail Consumer Tariffs in the Rural Areas or Consumers’ Paying Ability and Cost of Supply in Rural Areas Through RE 57
  • 58. Dr S N SRINIVAS Programme Officer (Energy for Development) United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) No. 55, Lodi Estate New Delhi – 110 003 Tel: 011- 4653 2251 (Direct) Fax: 011- 2462 7612 E-mail: sn.srinivas@undp.org Website: www.in.undp.org