Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh

97

Published on

This presentation is intended for Sep 21 2013 event for Apartments in Bangalore under Tie & IIHS, Sustainable City. …

This presentation is intended for Sep 21 2013 event for Apartments in Bangalore under Tie & IIHS, Sustainable City.

Presentation by Arvind Tiwary, Co-chair, Clean Tech SIG, TiE Bangalore.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
97
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Alternative Energy: The time is Nigh ArvindTiwary Co-chair, Clean Tech SIG, TiE Bangalore SangEnnovate
  • 2. Background  This presentation is intended for Sep 21 2013 event for Apartments in Bangalore under Tie & IIHS, Sustainable City  Numbers quoted are illustrative and taken from end 2013 and early 2013  Credits to TiE members  Uday / Trueskill  Manasij / EnerPlus  Ramesh / Buildmet  Gautam, Pamli , Ashok .. Note: Volatility in Exchange rates will alter the numbers a bit !!
  • 3. Grid Power: A implosion waiting to happen  India has a net deficit of Electric power  Demand exceeds Supply esp in South by 16-22%. (Source Central Electricity Authority)  Distribution companies are loosing Money  Grid power charged at Rs5-10/Unit  Accounting for T&D losses etc DISCOM will need 10-12 /Unit to break even  Future is Not BRIGHT  Losses mean less “investment” in Operational maintenance  Losses dis–incentive to more generation capacity  Grid Blackout, Increasing brownout likely  MNRE  Natn Renewable Energy 12%  30% Subsidy  SCI Solar Corporation of India
  • 4. Economics of Electricity
  • 5. Item Current Situation Grid • Domestic 5.6 Rs /unit • Commercial 7-12 Rs /unit • Inflation 6-8%  Rs 8 ++ by 2017 Diesel ~3-6 KwH /L  Rs 13-22 /Unit (OPEX also Efficiency varies by Load% ) Solar PV Merchant or Utility Level ( MW Scale) • Gujarat 2010-2012 Tenders Rs 12.54/unit LCOE ( leveled cost over 20 -25 years CAPEX planned 16.5 Crore /MW) • now seeking tariff for purchase by State Electricity Board around Rs 9/Unit (Actual CAPEX 11.2 Crore /MW) • Residential Roof Top Solar in Bangalore expected at LCOE around Rs 6-7/Unit ( Grid Connected No Batteries) Wind Rs 3.5-5.5 /Unit @ MW Scale . Avg 20% utilization BioGas Rs 2.5 – 4/unit Gas Electricity Generator Economics of Electricity
  • 6. FIT Feed in Tariffs • Utility (BESCOM) to pay Consumers for feeding Electricity to Grid • Allows BESCOM to delay capacity Addition, Peak power reduces Distribution loses as distributed generation and local usage • Needs smart grid. Metering, Demand and supply forecasting and dispatching Net Metering ( Lets Pray it is in Pipeline!!) • Meter of power consumed from Grid • Meter of power fed to Grid • Net Power used is billed by BESCOM • No payment from BESCOM if you supplied more then used Grid Feeding • Pilot with 440V 3 Phase balanced and conditioned ( Voltage and frequency bands ) • Later 220V single phase
  • 7. Comparison • CAPEX Rs 1.5 L/KW • LCOE 6-7/Unit • Most suitable for urban Bangalore. Proven technology and vibrant supplier eco system. Probably low point in TCO cycle Solar • Rs 1.0-3 L/KW • 4-5/Unit • Mainstream at MW scale. Wind Farms. Urban settings need new approach. Few vendors for Sub MW scale Wind • Rs 0,8 – 1.5L/KW • Rs 2.5-4 /unit • Bio to cooking gas Robust mass adoption. • Convert to power using gas generator • Older designs need constant care and manual intervention. • Continuous process Bio
  • 8. Bio Gas
  • 9. Gas and Power Output 1 Tonne/Day = 60 kWh/day3 1m3 Biogas = 0.4 kg of LPG 1m3 Biogas = 1 kWh Electricity 1 Tonne/Day = 24-28 kg of LPG 1 Tonne Municipal Waste ~ 60-70 m 1 Tonne/Day = 100 kg fertilizer Feedstock Typical Gas Output (m3 per tonne) Cattle & Animal Waste 15-25 Chicken Litter 30-100 Grass & Farm Waste 160-220 Food Waste 200-600 • % of Wet Wastes in MSW – 40-50% • Household – 40% • Hotels/ Resorts / Malls – 50% • Fruit & Vegetable Markets – 10% 400gm/Person/day
  • 10. IISc Slug Flow Biogas Plant 1 tpd plant at BITS Goa Campus, 2009: Mess and kitchen wastes
  • 11. Wind
  • 12. Wind  Large scale Wind farm deployments  Peak power varies as cube of wind speed  Intermittent 20% utilization  Wind shadows and turbulence in urban setting  Common Horizontal Axis. Large MW range  Avg Annual Wind speed 15-26 MPH  30 year Life cycle  Wear tear on moving parts. SW optimization for direction etc.  Leveled costs can be low  Need to extrapolate from Airport wind measurements or do annual data collection
  • 13. Wind Energy Utilization 7.3% March 99 50.6 July 2006
  • 14. Micro Vertical Wind Turbine : Old Wine in New Bottle for urban settings  650Wp to 5 KWp  3-7 meters height. Avoid 10 X Ht wind shadow on roof top.  Power from 10 Mph + . Optimum around 15-25 Mph  160 Kg /2KWp to 600 Kg 5KWp
  • 15. Solar PV
  • 16. Types of Solar PV usage  Direct DC loads.  Low power. No BIG Startup surge ( AC, Pump)  Grid Connected  Direct AC inverter  Needs Grid Reference Voltage, Frequency for Invertors  220V single phase or 3 phase 440V.  Special Invertors for Indian volatile grid conditions  Off Grid  Battery Backup ( Special Battery !!)  Offload Diesel  Low penetration < 20%  High penetration > 70% Overload from Solar PV, Dump load  Charger Control  Under , Over charge, Deep Discharge cycle  Conditioning Load, Frequency, Voltage
  • 17. Recommendation
  • 18. Goal for Energy Security  Reduce consumption by 5-12%  Energy Audit  Source 25-33% from alternative sources  Solar, Wind, Bio  Dedicated usage only if very clear ROI and robust  Solar Pump, STP  Hybrid or Mixed usage  Power produced is converted to AC and Voltage and Frequency stabilized to grid level  DG Set is rarely used for full backup as Solar, etc provide  Modularize DG to work efficiently at different loads  Priority to use Own Produced energy before Grid
  • 19. Types of Renewable Energy Usage Hybrid ( Recommended ) Multiple Energy Sources Grid (100%) , GenSet ( 20- 80%) Solar PV, Optional Wind Bio (20-33%) Battery (Small 5- 10%) MultipleWiring Grid / GenSet Only Load, DC only Load Conditioning, Trackers, Islanding Voltage , Amperage and frequency variance Ability to Isolate subsystem, component Track peak demand ( Pump, AC startup) and generation (Very bright sunny day) Prioritization User defined : Solar, Grid, GenSet Use cases : No Grid Genset+PV, No GenSet Grid +PV , No Grid & No Genset only PV,
  • 20. KEY Question Willingness to pay for CAPEX to secure lower cost power then genset Summary  Consider 20KWp+ Hybrid.  Solar PV between 15-50KWp Hybrid grid .Small 2-10 KWp Wind/ Bio  Feed to grid 440V 3 phase to benefit for future net Metering  Use existing Genset backup rather then “overinvest” in Battery  Contracting Approach  Quality over cost as expensive if failures over 20-25 year cycle  Invertors and Installation (Wiring, enclosures) are hotspots.  IP6 Open Enclosures wind, water, hail, earthing, High DC Amperage flow …  Failure points and replacements costed in . Invertors etc  Need to arrange credible support for long term supply 15-20 years.  Consider some form of power purchase to keep engagement  We will buy Power at agreed rates for 10-12 years.  We will need to invest 30% of CAPEX ( 20-30L) for reasonable rates.  Alternative Energy projects are financed at 13%+ by Commercial banks  Subsidy may go away. So please start NOW….  End of Life disposal issues
  • 21. Disruptive Future  Producer  Centralized, Utility Newspaper  Consumer  Distributed, Mass  ProSumer  Citizen Journalist  Differentiated Niches  Distributed Power generation and consumption
  • 22. Thank You Event Sponsors & Partners

×