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viewo Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CS3240 - Human Computer InteractionLecture 1 : Usability of Interactive Systems Lecturer : Dr Bimlesh Wadhwa dcsbw@nus.edu.sg dcsb @n s ed sg
  • 2. Content1.1 Interaction Design & HCI2. Evolution of HCI3. User, Usability and UX , y 1-2
  • 3. 1-3
  • 4. Interaction Design & HCIComputing and communication devices,Museums, Library, E hibitiM Lib Exhibition,On-line communities, Websites, 1-4Phone applications…. 1-4
  • 5. Example From: www.baddesigns.com 1-5
  • 6. Examples 1-6
  • 7. Interaction Design & HCI• Art Craft or Engineering Art, 1-7 1-7
  • 8. Interaction Design & HCIHuman-computer interaction is a discipline concerned with the design design, evaluation and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with th study of major d ith the phenomena surrounding them. -- Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) 1-8
  • 9. Interaction Design & HCI Designing interactive p g g products to support the way p p pp y people communicate and interact in their everyday and working lives – Sharp Rogers and Preece (2007) Sharp, 1-9
  • 10. Interaction Design & HCI The design of spaces for human communication and interaction – Terry Winograd (1997) 1-10
  • 11. Interaction Design & HCIArtists and designers are trained to use the language of explicitmeanings to a rich communicative element over and above directfunctional communication. If we only design with the communicationfunction of something, not what it alsocommunicates, we risk our designs beingmisinterpreted. W t we waste an opportunity to i i t t d Worst, t t it tenhance everyday life. Bill Moggridge 1-11
  • 12. Interaction Design & HCI Find and read what (i) Jakob Nielsen & ( ) (ii) Don Norman have to say about HCI and Interaction Design. Jakob Nielsen : useit.com Don Norman : jnd.org 1-12
  • 13. Interaction Design & HCIIt is about understanding and creating software and products and technologies that people will want to use, will be able to use and will use use, find effective when used. Example : http://futureselfservicebanking.com/ htt //f t lf i b ki / 1-13
  • 14. Content1.1 Interaction Design & HCI2. Evolution of HCI3. User, Usability and UX , y 1-14
  • 15. Evolution fE l ti ofHCI
  • 16. HCI- BeginningThe beginning of HCI is traced to the March 1982 ( g g (U.S.) ) National Bureau of Standards conference, "Human Factors in Computer Systems“. 1-16
  • 17. HCI- FoundationIterative development from software engineeringUser interface software from computer graphicsPsychology & human factors of computing systemsModels, theories, and frameworks from cognitive science 1-17
  • 18. HCI- Key initiatives yACMs Special Interest Group in Computer- Human Interaction (SIGCHI). ( ) IFIPs Task Group on Human-Computer Interaction (later, Technical Committee 13). 1-18
  • 19. HCI- FocusInitial focus :• methods and software, and• the integration of the two in a framework called user- centered system development. t d t d l tOther focal areas that have developed• groupware/cooperative activity• media/information. 1-19
  • 20. Evolution of HCI Read up more about past-present-future of HCI. Example : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpvjEg9IiSc People Trends Products HCI Technologies Tools Challenges 1-20
  • 21. Content1.1 Interaction Design & HCI2. Evolution of HCI3. User, Usability and UX , y 1-21
  • 22. 1-22
  • 23. User– Who the users are.– What activities are being carried out.– Where the interaction is taking place. 1-23 Anna, IKEA online sales agent
  • 24. Usability• user-friendly easy to use; accessible; comprehensible; intelligible; idiot proof; available; and ready f il bl d d• “friend” friend – helps – valuable. – understands d t d – reliable and doesn’t hurt. – pleasant 1-24 1-24
  • 25. Usability goals• Effective to use• Efficient to use• Safe to use• Easy to learn• Easy to remember how to use• ... 1-25
  • 26. Usability motivations• Life-critical systems – e.g. Air traffic control, nuclear reactors – High costs, reliability and effectiveness expected – Lengthy training periods – Subjective satisfaction is less an issue 1-26 1-26
  • 27. Usability motivations (cont.)• Industrial and commercial uses – e.g. Banking, insurance, pos – Speed of performance, satisfaction & Ease of learning fairly important – Error rates are relative to cost 1-27 1-27
  • 28. Usability motivations (cont.)• Office, home, and entertainment applications Word processing, electronic mail Ease of learning, satisfaction, online h l l E fl i ti f ti li help, low cost t important Population has a wide range of both novice and expert users 1-28 1-28
  • 29. Usability motivations (cont.)• Exploratory, creative, and cooperative systems Web browsing, search engines, artist toolkits, scientific modeling systems Collaborative work Benchmarks are hard to describe for exploratory tasks d device t k and d i users. 1-29 1-29
  • 30. Usability motivations (cont.)• Social-technical systems e.g. Voting, health support, identity verification, crime reporting Trust, privacy, responsibility, and security are issues Verifiable sources and status feedback are important Administrators need tools to detect unusual patterns of usage 1-30 1-30
  • 31. Universal Usability Human dimensions, strength, reach Sense perception Vision: depth contrast, color blindness, and depth, contrast blindness motion sensitivity Screen-brightness preferences Touch: keyboard To ch ke board and to chscreen sensiti it touchscreen sensitivity Hearing: distinct audio clues 1-31 1-31
  • 32. Universal Usability • Physical abilities and physical workplaces Human dimensions, strength, reach Sense perception Vision: depth contrast, color blindness, and depth, contrast blindness motion sensitivity Screen-brightness preferences Touch: keyboard To ch ke board and to chscreen sensiti it touchscreen sensitivity Hearing: distinct audio cluesThe standard ANSI/HFES 100-2007 Human Factors Engineering of Computer 1-32Workstations (2007) 1-32
  • 33. Universal Usability (cont.)• Users with physical challenges p y g• Older Adult Users• Younger users 1-33 1-33
  • 34. Universal Usability (cont.)• C Cognitive and perceptual abilities ii d l bili i • Long-term, Short term, and Sensory memory Long term, Short-term, • Language communication and comprehension • Learning, skill development, knowledge acquisition, and concept attainment • Problem solving and reasoning • Decision making and risk assessment 1-34 1-34
  • 35. Universal Usability (cont.)• Personality differences• C lt Cultural and international diversity l di t ti l di it – Left-to-right versus right-to-left versus vertical input and reading – Characters, numerals, special characters, and diacriticals – Date and time formats , Numeric and currency formats – Weights and measures – Telephone numbers and addresses – Names and titles (Mr Ms Mme ) (Mr., Ms., Mme.) – Social-security, national identification, and passport numbers – Capitalization and punctuation – So t g seque ces Sorting sequences – Icons, buttons, colors – Pluralization, grammar, spelling – Etiquette, policies, tone, formality, metaphors 1-35 1-35
  • 36. User eXperience 1-36
  • 37. UX• “look and feel” (Mac) 1-37 1-37
  • 38. UX• “look and feel” (Vista) 1-38 1-38
  • 39. UX• “look and feel” … 1-39 1-39
  • 40. UX Goals 1-40
  • 41. Lecture 1 Key po ts ey points1. Interaction design is concerned with designing interactiveproducts to support the way people communicate andinteract in their everyday and working lives.2. It is concerned with how to create quality user experiences.3. It requires taking into account a number of interdependentfactors, including context of use, type of activities, culturaldifferences,differences and user groups groups.4. It is multidisciplinary, & involves many inputs from wide- y yreaching disciplines and fields. 1-41