Startup Accelerator 2014: Getting Funding - Art of Fundraising

  • 1,611 views
Uploaded on

Aloke Bajpai

Aloke Bajpai

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,611
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
31
Comments
0
Likes
3

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The  Art  of  Fundraising     Aloke  Bajpai   CEO  &  Co-­‐Founder,  ixigo.com      
  • 2. About  myself   ¡  Founded  ixigo  in  2006   ¡  Bootstrapped  1.5  years  with  money  from  3Fs   ¡  Seed  +  Bridge  :  ~$1M   ¤ Seed  Round  in  2008  :  BAF  Spectrum  Singapore   ¤ Bridge  Round  in  2009  :  exisQng  investors   ¡  Financial  +  Strategic  Round  in  2011  :  SAIF  +   MakeMyTrip  :  $18.5  M  (primary  +  secondary)   ¡  Have  seen  4  term-­‐sheets  for  ixigo.  Rejected  1,   closed  2  &  1  fell-­‐through  
  • 3. Should  you  raise  money  at  all  ?   ¡  Working-­‐capital  vs.  Long-­‐term  investments   ¡  Debt  vs.  Equity   ¡  Lifestyle  business  vs.  Scalable  venture   ¡  Ability  to  give  liquidity  to  investors   ¡  Valley  of  death    
  • 4. When  do  you  raise  money  
  • 5. Fundraise  hierarchy   individual  angel  investors  /  incubators     angel  groups  /  accelerators   seed  funds   early-­‐stage  funds   mid-­‐stage  /   strategic   late-­‐stage  /   strategic   Stage   Idea  /   Prototype   MVP   Product-­‐ Market  Fit    /     Business   Model   Users  /   Customers   Growth   Topline   Growth   Profitability  
  • 6. When  do  you  raise  money?   ¡  3Fs  +  incubators  +  accelerators  :  to  build  MVP   and  discover  product-­‐market  fit.     ¡  Angels:  to  build  a  great  product  +  get  iniQal   customers  +  team   ¡  VCs:  to  scale  and  grow  fast  to  build  a  bigger   company   ¡  Raise  when  the  sector  is  hot,  Raise  when   investors  chase  you,  Raise  when  you  have   great  things  going    
  • 7. How  does  it  work  ?   Imagine  that  Raj  and  Ganesh  own  50%  in  a   company  valued  at  $8M  pre-­‐money  and  $5M  is   being  invested  by  a  VC.   Raj,  31%   Ganesh,   31%   Investors,   38%   Raj,  50%  Ganesh,   50%  
  • 8. How  much  should  you  raise  ?   ¡  Prior  to  prototype  :  zero  /  minimal   ¡  3Fs  /  Angels  :  enough  to  get  to  first  revenue  or   first  100,000  monthly  users  +  a  few  hires   ¡  Seed  /  Series  A:  enough  to  get  to  a  point   where  you  can  validate  your  business  model   and  show  repeatable  success   ¡  Series  B,  C  :  enough  to  build  dominance      
  • 9. How  much  equity  to  give?   ¡  Based  on  how  much  diluQon  you  can   anQcipate  and  tolerate  for  future  rounds.     ¡  14”  pizza,  1/4  slice  >  6”  pizza     Dilu@on   ¡  Prior  to  prototype  :  minimal     ¡  Post  3Fs  /  Angels  :  try  to  keep  investors  <10%   ¡  Post  seed  :  try  to  keep  investors  <26%     ¡  Post  Series  A:  try  to  keep  investors  <40%   ¡  Keep  5-­‐10%  for  ESOP  
  • 10. Valua@on  ?   ¡  Based  on  how  much  you  wish  to  raise  and   how  much  you  wish  to  give  for  it   ¡  Sanity  check  based  on  comparable  deals  /   companies  in  your  space   ¡  How  large  is  the  space  ?  What  sort  of  exit  can   be  anQcipated  ?  Then  apply  the  rate-­‐of-­‐return   constraints  depending  on  size  of  exit   anQcipated  –  For  the  VC  to  make  at  least  a  10x  return  in  6   years  by  selling  the  company  for  >=$100M,  the  post  money   has  to  be  <=$10M  for  the  Series  A  round.      
  • 11. Valua@on  ?   VCs  pay  a  premium  for   ¡  Hot  sector  (“I  go'a  be  in  this  space”)   ¡  Bemer  teams  (“The  best  guys  in  this  space”)   ¡  Market  leadership  (“They  are  #1  already”)   ¡  Faster  growth  (“They  are  growing  twice  as  fast  as   the  #1”)   ¡  Huge  market  (“This  can  become  a  $1B  company”)     ¡  ….  beaQng  other  VCs  to  the  deal.  (“If  we  don’t   invest,  they  will”)  
  • 12. Whom  should  you  raise  from?   ¡  Smart  money  beats  dumb  money   ¡  Research  backgrounds  of  people     ¡  Fitment  in  terms  of  stage  /  size  of  investment  is   criQcal  for  discussion  to  progress   ¡  It’s  like  a  marriage  –  make  sure  you  get  along  with   the  individual     ¡  Understanding  of  space  /  your  type  of  companies  is   important  –  ask  them  quesQons   ¡  Take  feedback  from  exisQng  investee  companies   before  accepQng  term-­‐sheets  
  • 13. Incubators  &  Accelerators   ¡  Tlabs,  Microsop  Accelerator,  GSF,  Morpheus,   The  Startup  Centre,  The  Hatch,  500  Startups   (&  many  more),  Venture  Nursery  etc.   ¡  IITs  /  IIMs  /  Other  educaQonal  insQtuQons   ¡  Incubator  =  Idea  +  Team  +  Prototype  +  10-­‐15  L   +  Co-­‐working  space  +  Shared  resources  +   Mentors  +  Product  discovery/pivot  +  Pitch  to   angel/seed  groups  
  • 14. Angels  &  Angel-­‐groups   ¡  Deep  Kalra,  Naveen  Tewari,  Rajan  Anandan,   Vijay  Shekhar  Sharma,  Vishal  Gondal,  Dinesh   Agarwal  etc.  (10  –  50  L)   ¡  Mumbai  Angels,  Hyderabad  Angels,  Chennai   Angels,  Indian  Angel  Network    (25  L  to  2  cr)     ¡  NRIs  /  Foreign  Angels   ¡  Letsventure  /  AngelList   ¡  Simple  Terms   ¡  Long  Qme  horizon  but  usually  willing  to  exit  in   Series  A  or  B  rounds  
  • 15. Seed  /  Early  Stage  Funds   ¡  SeedFund,  Blume,  Kae,  VentureEast,  Jungle   Ventures,  Nexus,  Ojas  (50L  to  3  crores)   ¡  SAIF,  Accel,  Sequoia,  Helion,  LightSpeed,   Inventus,  Kalaari  etc.  (1  crore  to  10  crores)   ¡  5  –  8  years  Qme  horizon  (can  even  extend  to   10  years)   ¡  Usually  do  follow  on  rounds  too     ¡  Elaborate  terms,  with  some  negoQaQon   around  them  inevitable  
  • 16. Growth  Funds   ¡  $5M+  investment   ¡  Almost  all  large  VC  funds  in  India   ¡  Tiger  Global,  Temasek,  KPCB   ¡  Also  ICICI,  SBI,  Kotak  PE  Arms   ¡  Corporate  Investment  Funds  (Intel,  Nokia,     Fidelity,  Qualcomm)   ¡  Corporate  PE  Arms  (Birla,  Reliance  etc)  
  • 17. Strategic  Investors   ¡  Examples:  Makemytrip  -­‐>  ixigo,  ebay  -­‐>   Snapdeal,  InfoEdge  -­‐>  Zomato  etc.   ¡  For  strategic  investors     ¤  Smart  use  of  cash  on  their  balance  sheet   ¤  Beung  on  future  driver  of  scale  /  new  business  model   ¤  SomeQmes  opQon  to  invest  more  /  acquire  in  future   ¤  Bemer  understanding  of  industry/product  than  VCs   ¡  For  startups   ¤  Strategic  insights  at  board  level  +  business  synergies   ¤  Bemer  access  to  future  growth  capital  /  exit  opQons   ¡  Ability  to  pursue  independent  strategies   important  for  value  maximizaQon    
  • 18. How  to  approach  investors     ¤  PULL  is  always  bemer  than  PUSH   •  Get  some  iniQal  coverage  before  meeQng  investors  so   that  they  have  “heard  about  you  somewhere”   ¤  Network  referrals  work  best  for  connecQng  to  key  people   –  amend  conferences,  events  etc.   ¤  Keep  the  email  intro  pitches  short  and  sweet  (4-­‐5  lines)   ¤  Who  are  you  meeQng  ?  Associates  /  Analysts  need  to   quickly  move  you  to  Partner  level  when  there  is  interest.     ¤  Figure  out  how  to  get  your  buzz  to  the  partners  in  parallel   (press  /  PR  /  network  /  twimer)     ¤  Staying  on  the  RADAR  is  important  to  land  a  partner   meeQng  
  • 19. How  to  approach  investors   ¤ Prepare  a  slick  deck  of  no  more  than  12  slides   ¤ Relevant  background  /  prior  experience  in  team   always  helps  –  wherever  you  have  it,  flaunt  it   ¤ Many  VCs  don’t  do  much  homework  for  1st   meeQng  -­‐  try  to  give  a  short  product  demo  or   prototype  mockup  /  video   ¤ Demonstrate  vast  and  deep  knowledge  of  your   landscape,  ecosystem  and  compeQQon   ¤ Follow  up  the  next  day  with  addiQonal  links  (e.g.   your  new  product,  recent  press  coverage  or   industry  arQcle  etc.)  
  • 20. Clinching  term-­‐sheets   ¡  Be  honest  and  transparent  with  investors   ¡  Do  not  over-­‐commit  or  over-­‐sell  any  numbers  or  facts   during  your  pitch.  It  is  best  to  accept  your  weaknesses   and  shortcomings.     ¡  Geung  great  people  on  board  as  team  members,   mentors,  angels  helps  validaQon   ¡  Keep  relaying  the  good  news  about  your  company  or   your  space  +  press  clippings   ¡  Strong  organic  growth  and  great  customer  feedback   help  in  geung  to  term-­‐sheets  quick   ¡  Rule  of  3:  It  shouldn’t  take  more  than  3  face-­‐to-­‐face   meeQngs  for  a  term-­‐sheet  to  happen.   ¡  From  1st  conversaQon  to  term-­‐sheet  can  take  anything   from  1  week  to  6  months.    
  • 21. Nego@a@ng  deals   ¡  NegoQate  the  most  criQcal  items  at  term-­‐sheet  stage   itself.  Nimy-­‐griues  will  come  in  the  50+  page  SHA.     ¡  Term-­‐sheet  shopping  (bad  idea  usually  unless  the  funds’   processes  were  moving  in  parallel)   ¡  SyndicaQon     ¡  Due  Diligence  Stage   ¡  A  deal  doesn’t  close  Qll  money  in  the  bank  so  don’t   speculate  in  the  media  before  that.   ¡  Budget  4-­‐12  weeks  post  term-­‐sheet  signing  for  closing   ¡  Do  NOT  do  press  before  money  is  in  the  b  
  • 22. Recap   ¡  Stay  frugal  Qll  first  few  customers  or  product   validaQon  (3Fs)     ¡  PR  is  very  important  for  investor  pull  –  you   need  to  keep  broadcasQng  what  you’re  upto   ¡  Rehearse  a  very  simple  1  or  2  line  elevator   pitch  that  explains  what  you  do  and  your   unique  value  proposiQon  and  market  size.     ¡  Prepare  a  slick  presentaQon  deck  for  investors     ¡  PaQence  and  perseverance  to  get  to  term-­‐ sheet.  Even  more  to  close  and  get  the  ca$h.  
  • 23. Last  words  of  advice   ¡  If  you  build  something  awesome  that  grows   like  wildfire,  investors  will  line  up  on  their  own     ¡  Most  companies  don’t  die  because  of  a  lack  of   capital.  They  die  because  of  team  dynamics  or   product-­‐market  fit  issues.  Do  not  spend  >20%   Qme  raising  money.  Keep  an  eye  on  the  ball.  
  • 24. Thank  You!     aloke  AT  ixigo  DOT  com