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Indian Higher Education - TiE Delhi NCR: Education and Training SIG Knowledge Series 23rd May
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Indian Higher Education - TiE Delhi NCR: Education and Training SIG Knowledge Series 23rd May

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  • 1. Indian Higher Education 22nd May, 2014
  • 2. Opportunities • India aims to increase GER (gross enrollment ratio) from ~19% in 2012 to 30% in 2020 – To achieve this, total capex and opex estimated to be USD 190 billion; higher education allocation in 11th Five Year Plan was USD 16.5 billion – This gap cannot be filled through public expenditure alone: private participation is inevitable • Number of students entering the higher education system is increasing at a steady rate – Number of people in age bracket 15-24 years, enrolled in higher education institutions, doubled from 30 million in 2004-05 to over 60 million in 2009-10 2
  • 3. Private universities catering to large portion of demand 3 Types of HEI’s in India Central Universities State Universities (Public) State Universities (Private) Deemed (Public & Private) Institutions of National Importance Out of ~ 35,000 colleges in the country, close to 75% are private
  • 4. State Private University Acts encouraging growth of non-public institutions 4 • Many Indian states passing their own private university acts – Making it easier for private players to enter the space – E.g.: Haryana, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh etc. • Significant autonomy to design curriculum and set fees being given • Indians willing to pay more for high-quality education – In the last 6-7 years, the average household spend on education has risen by 21% – More awareness of high-quality higher education; no. of students going abroad for expensive education increasing
  • 5. Hurdles to achieving excellence • Focus on quantitative aspects rather than qualitative – Quality measured only in terms of areas built, number of books bought etc. • Low incentive for innovation – Institutions wary of experimentation due to set rules • Short-term approach of institution builders – Great institutions take years to create • Treating teachers as cost that needs to be minimized – Faculty the real assets of an institution • All stakeholders esp. private players, not involved in policy- making – Leads to mediocre levels of quality targets being set by government5
  • 6. Ashoka University – Bringing Ivy League quality education to India • Aiming high: ‘To build one of the finest universities of the world in India founded on the principles of liberal learning’ • Carefully selected faculty: Only those with high-quality credentials (PhD’s from best universities) • Leveraging collaborations: Across the spectrum partnerships: from Ivy League (UPenn) to small liberal arts college (Carleton) • Innovative Curriculum: Focus on critical thinking, problem solving, communication and leadership • Credible founders: Philanthropists genuinely passionate about education and committed for the long term 6
  • 7. Thanks 7