Searching consistently when terminology changes - with Web of Science
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  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder research can be traced back to 1902. During this long history ADHD has been known by several names, which can lead to difficulties when attempting to perform a complete review of important research in this field.
  • Latest 5 years (2002 – June 2007) 5645 total ADHD papers published 2002 – June 2007. ADHD research published 2002-07 cited research published 1970-1979 8,464 times. 1960-1969 was cited 2189 times 1950-1959 was cited 789 times 1940-1949 was cited 337 times None of these cited articles would have “Attention Deficit Disorder” anywhere in the text. All of these cited years were periods when ADHD was known by other various names.
  • In the 1920s and 1930s, ADHD was attributed to brain damage caused by encephalitis; in the 1960s it was discovered that this condition could exist without brain injury. As the understanding of ADHD changed, the terminology also changed. The fact that ADHD has gone through a number of name changes is important when trying to perform a complete overview of this topic. Using cited references, and Web of Science tools such as Related Records, help the user to maximize the number of results.
  • This slide shows three papers that have been published during times that ADHD was known by different names – 1930 chronic epidemic encephalitis, 1973 minimal cerebral dysfunction, 1997 attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Each of these papers cited Still GF’s 1902 lecture.
  • This slide shows three papers that have been published during times that ADHD was known by different names – 1930 chronic epidemic encephalitis, 1973 minimal cerebral dysfunction, 1997 attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Each of these papers cited Still GF’s 1902 lecture.

Searching consistently when terminology changes - with Web of Science Searching consistently when terminology changes - with Web of Science Presentation Transcript

  • SEARCHING CONSISTENTLY WHEN TERMINOLOGY CHANGES WITH THE WEB OF SCIENCE SM
    • BIOSIS Previews and Web of Science Example:
    • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    • Although research of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) surged in the 1990’s, there is a long history of research in this field dating back to 1902.
    • ADHD has been known by several names since it was first recognized, which can lead to difficulties when attempting to perform a complete review of important research in this field.
    SEARCHING CONSISTENTLY WHEN TERMINOLOGY CHANGES
  • Citations from Recent ADHD Articles New ADHD research continues to cite research spanning over 100 years. ADHD articles published in the last 5 years cited research published pre-1980 12,428 times.
  • Web of Science – Uncover information that may have been missed by keyword searching alone
    • The beginnings of ADHD research can be traced to a series of lectures published in 1902 by Sir George F. Still. These papers described a group of children with behavioral problems that would be recognized as ADHD today.
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder National Institute of Mental Health http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/adhd.cfm Because of Web of Science’s unique coverage of over 100 years of cited references, we are able to trace the development of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder research from its beginnings in 1902 to the modern breakthroughs of today.
  • Changes in Terminology In the 1920s and 1930s, ADHD was attributed to brain damage caused by encephalitis; in the 1960s it was discovered that this condition could exist without brain injury. As the understanding of ADHD changed, the terminology also changed. 1920’s - Post-encephalitic Behavior Disorders 1960’s - Minimal Brain Dysfunction 1980’s - Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Using the Web of Science we can trace citations directly to Still’s papers from the different periods of understanding of this disorder. 1930 - Chronic Epidemic Encephalitis 1973 - Minimal Cerebral Dysfunction 1997 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Using the Web of Science we can trace citations directly to Still’s papers from the different periods of understanding of this disorder. 1973 - Minimal Cerebral Dysfunction 1966 - Hyperactive Child Syndrome 1981 – Pervasively Hyperactive Children 2000 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder 1930 - Chronic Epidemic Encephalitis 1997 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder