Accelerated Reader™

       Positive impacts of
       incentive-based
       reading management
       programs

        ...
How AR Works

   Students selects AR books based on
    their reading levels.
   Students read books on their own and
  ...
Getting Started with AR
When implementing AR, some basic
guidelines should be considered…
 Allocate enough funds to
  pur...
Using AR As a Tool

   Not meant to be a stand-alone
    reading program but rather a way to
    gather feedback on stude...
Using AR As A Tool
           Functions as an alternative to
            the traditional “class novel”
            approa...
Using AR As a Tool
   Improper use of a
    reading incentive
    program would be to
    use it as part of
    students’...
Key Benefits of Using AR
    1. Motivates reluctant readers.
     Attainable goals are set.
     Students can see visual...
Key Benefits
2. Improves test scores if used correctly.
 Reading practice builds vocabulary
  and comprehension in all su...
Key Benefits
 Students in low socioeconomic settings saw the
  biggest impact as they stood the most to gain
  from a too...
Key Benefits

3. Increases media center circulation,
   some schools by 25% to 75%.
4. Gives students independence in book...
Collaboration
   A balanced literacy
    program pairs reading
    skills instruction in the
    classroom with AR
    bo...
Differentiated and
Individualized Instruction
   Teachers and teacher-librarians work together
    to help students get t...
Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic
Motivation—Hot Debate
Intrinsic and Extrinsic motivators are
actually in continuum.
 Intrinsic mo...
Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic

Not all children are
intrinsically motivated
to learn from the get-
go.
 Some children’s
  intri...
Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic

                 Some cultural
                 backgrounds do better
                 when tangi...
Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic

When properly used,
rewards motivate students
without harmful effects.
(Think for a second about ...
Reasons to encourage
rather than downplay
   Not all about incentives. Software
    contains student management and
    a...
Reasons to encourage

   In the absence of prizes, the goal of
    helping students read progressively
    harder and lon...
Reasons to encourage

   Feedback from quizzes can raise
    students’ motivation levels by
    allowing them to monitor ...
Reasons to encourage

   Schools with AR
    outperformed schools
    without it in all subject
    areas.
Concluding Remarks

   The benefits outweigh disadvantages
    of reading incentive programs.
   AR is a tool that helps...
Concluding Remarks

                     Enables appropriate, timely,
                      and consistent feedback for
 ...
References
Greer, J. (2003). Point: A Positive Experience with
   Accelerated Reader. Teacher Librarian, 30(4), 32.
   Ret...
References
Paul, T.; VanderZee, D.; Rue, T.; & Swanson, S. (1996).
   Impact of the Accelerated Reader Technology-Based
  ...
References
Topping, K. (1999, November). Summary and Conclusions.
   In Formative Assessment of Reading Comprehension
    ...
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Ar debate presentation

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A PowerPoint that discusses the ways AR can be used as a positive incentive program that, when implemented properly, leads to increases in student achievement.

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Ar debate presentation

  1. 1. Accelerated Reader™ Positive impacts of incentive-based reading management programs Theresa Quilici MEDT 6461
  2. 2. How AR Works  Students selects AR books based on their reading levels.  Students read books on their own and take computerized quizzes over books’ content.  Quizzes are scored giving student immediate, individualized, and constructive feedback.
  3. 3. Getting Started with AR When implementing AR, some basic guidelines should be considered…  Allocate enough funds to purchase a wide selection of books and tests.  Keep AR voluntary as it was never meant to be for part of a required grade.  Train teachers properly in the software to use it most effectively.
  4. 4. Using AR As a Tool  Not meant to be a stand-alone reading program but rather a way to gather feedback on students’ progress, a supplement to reading instruction.  Feedback given for each student directs targeted and individualized practice for that student.
  5. 5. Using AR As A Tool  Functions as an alternative to the traditional “class novel” approach.  Students are allowed to choose their own books based on reading ability and interest.  Students read at their own pace.  Frees up time to teach higher- level reading skills rather than taking time to discuss chapters and quizzes.
  6. 6. Using AR As a Tool  Improper use of a reading incentive program would be to use it as part of students’ grade because that works against reading for pleasure.
  7. 7. Key Benefits of Using AR 1. Motivates reluctant readers.  Attainable goals are set.  Students can see visual representations of their improvement.  Success elevates self-esteem.
  8. 8. Key Benefits 2. Improves test scores if used correctly.  Reading practice builds vocabulary and comprehension in all subjects, leading to all around achievement.  Of 12 studies with substantial data, only one failed to find gains in norm- referenced scores.
  9. 9. Key Benefits  Students in low socioeconomic settings saw the biggest impact as they stood the most to gain from a tool that motivates reading.
  10. 10. Key Benefits 3. Increases media center circulation, some schools by 25% to 75%. 4. Gives students independence in book choice and with independent reading time (sustained silent reading). 5. Provides opportunity for collaboration between teacher and teacher- librarian.
  11. 11. Collaboration  A balanced literacy program pairs reading skills instruction in the classroom with AR books found in the media center.  Media specialists can provide teachers with AR books to complement content being taught in any subject area.
  12. 12. Differentiated and Individualized Instruction  Teachers and teacher-librarians work together to help students get to know themselves individually as readers and explore their likes and dislikes.  Instruction is differentiated for each student when supplemental reading is used as enrichment to reinforce reading skills.
  13. 13. Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic Motivation—Hot Debate Intrinsic and Extrinsic motivators are actually in continuum.  Intrinsic motivators come about through external factors such as social reinforcement.  Extrinsic motivators involve learners’ drives, aspirations, and self-concepts and does not extinguish intrinsic motivation, enhances it.  Extrinsic motivators such as positive praise stimulates intrinsic interest.
  14. 14. Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic Not all children are intrinsically motivated to learn from the get- go.  Some children’s intrinsic desires to learn grow through self-discovery attained through external feedback.
  15. 15. Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic Some cultural backgrounds do better when tangible feedback is given to trigger learning motivation.  Tangible rewards can communicate the value a school places on literacy to minority and/or at- risk children while providing immediate reinforcement of success.
  16. 16. Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic When properly used, rewards motivate students without harmful effects. (Think for a second about how many of us have frequent flyer points for flying or using our credit cards. Is that harmful? What if there was no way to earn points? How about professional athletes? Would they play without incentive clauses?)
  17. 17. Reasons to encourage rather than downplay  Not all about incentives. Software contains student management and assessment tools teachers can use tailored to individual student’s needs.  When points are not used as “dangling carrots,” rewards may be used only enough to maintain motivation.
  18. 18. Reasons to encourage  In the absence of prizes, the goal of helping students read progressively harder and longer books, fiction or nonfiction, is still achieved.
  19. 19. Reasons to encourage  Feedback from quizzes can raise students’ motivation levels by allowing them to monitor their progress and making changes to improve where necessary. Further, teachers can enhance this through scaffolding, or building upon what a student already knows and taking it one step further.
  20. 20. Reasons to encourage  Schools with AR outperformed schools without it in all subject areas.
  21. 21. Concluding Remarks  The benefits outweigh disadvantages of reading incentive programs.  AR is a tool that helps deliver curriculum effectively with proper training.
  22. 22. Concluding Remarks  Enables appropriate, timely, and consistent feedback for additional practice or early intervention.  Most importantly, it helps motivate students to discover an intrinsic love of learning and reading within themselves.
  23. 23. References Greer, J. (2003). Point: A Positive Experience with Accelerated Reader. Teacher Librarian, 30(4), 32. Retrieved from Research Library database. Grenawalt, V. (2004). Going Beyond the Debate: Using Technology and Instruction for a Balanced Reading Program. Teacher Librarian, 32(2), 12-15. Retrieved from Research Library database. Institute for Academic Excellence, Inc. (1997). Toward a Balanced Approach to Reading Motivation: Resolving the Intrinsic-Extrinsic Rewards Debate. Madison, WI: Author. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED421687)
  24. 24. References Paul, T.; VanderZee, D.; Rue, T.; & Swanson, S. (1996). Impact of the Accelerated Reader Technology-Based Literacy Program on Overall Academic Achievement and School Attendance. Madison, WI: Institute for Academic Excellence. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED421684) Persinger, J. M. (2001). What Are the Characteristics of a Successful Implementation of Accelerated Reader? Knowledge Quest, 29(5), 30. Retrieved from ProQuest Education Journals database.
  25. 25. References Topping, K. (1999, November). Summary and Conclusions. In Formative Assessment of Reading Comprehension by Computer: Advantages and Disadvantages of The Accelerated Reader Software. Retrieved April 22, 2008, from http://www.readingonline.org/critical/topping/rolarR.ht ml Trelease, J. (2006). SSR—Sustained Silent Reading, Reading Aloud's Silent Partner. In The Read-Aloud Handbook (chap 5). Retrieved April 22, 2008, from http://www.trelease-on-reading.com/rah-ch5-pg3.html (All images used in this presentation are from Microsoft Office Clipart, 2008)

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