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Solar technologies you can use in your Indian home
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Solar technologies you can use in your Indian home

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Greenprint Your Home: U Solar CEO Harinarayan presents the various solar technologies available in the market today for homes. More at www.thealternative.in/greenprint-your-home

Greenprint Your Home: U Solar CEO Harinarayan presents the various solar technologies available in the market today for homes. More at www.thealternative.in/greenprint-your-home

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  • The mission consists of broadly three schemes:
    Grid connected solar power projects
    Roof-top and other small solar power plants
    Off-grid and decentralized solar applications
    The first 2 schemes involve generating electricity from solar and being evacuated to the grid
  • Transcript

    • 1. Rooftop Power for Green Homes Presented by 1
    • 2. The Sun offers more energy in a quarter of an hour than the entire world can use in a whole year…. 2
    • 3. Tapping Solar Power… Solar Photo Voltaic Systems (LIGHT) – Use for generation Electricity – The fastest growing power generation technologies in the world – Worldwide penetration in over 100 countries Solar Thermal Systems (HEAT) – Used for Heating applications – A sustainable and most economical way to heat water for residential or commercial purposes 3
    • 4. Agenda • Solar Thermal • Solar PV • Energizing Rooftops
    • 5. Sustainable and Economical solution to heat water SOLAR THERMAL SYSTEMS 5
    • 6. Technology Options Flat Plate Collectors Evacuated Tube Collectors Concentrating or Parabolic Collectors 6
    • 7. Technology Options (Residential) Flat Plat Collectors Insulated plates under one or more glass polymer covers More robust and longer life Evacuated Tube Collectors Rows of transparent glass tubes and inner metal tubes Not as rugged as flat plate collectors More expensive due to copper content Efficiency of 40% Less expensive Performance is affected in overcast conditions Lower Absorber gross area Performance is not affected in overcast conditions Higher absorber gross area Efficiency of 45% 7
    • 8. Additional Options Re-circulating Pump – Useful for getting instant hot-water – Important if tap to water tank distance is significant (eg: flat is in the lower floor of complex, or tank serves multiple apartments) Heating Element – Heating element for days when sunshine is poor or water usage is very high – Heating element fitted in the water-tank with a manual turn on/off switch (can be automated with some logic for large installations) Hard Water – heat exchanger option – If water is hard (> 200ppm), then life of Solar Water Heater is affected – Better to have a “heat exchanger” where the heating fluid is different from the water that is finally used 8
    • 9. Agenda • Solar Thermal • Solar PV • Energizing Rooftops
    • 10. ‘Generating free power while the sun shines’ SOLAR ROOF TOP PV 10
    • 11. Working of a Solar PV system – Off Grid Electrons in upper layer of wafer substance get excited, causing voltage difference from lower layer of wafer Sun’s rays light up the upper layer of wafer substance in Solar PV cell module e In the event the Solar Power runs out, the AC Mains /GRID takes over AC The Sun GRID Power + The batteries supplies power to the inverter, which supplies AC to the loads - Inverter Voltage difference between wafer layers in module cause s electric current to be generated, which is sent through cables to charge controller AC Loads Charge Controller Charge controller charges the batteries during sunlight and controls the charging levels Solar Power from the batteries is used as a “first priority” DC Loads are directly powered from the batteries 11
    • 12. Working of a Solar PV system – Grid Tied Electrons in upper layer of wafer substance get excited, causing voltage difference from lower layer of wafer e Sun’s rays light up the upper layer of wafer substance in Solar PV cell module The Sun + - AC GRID Power Voltage difference between wafer layers in module cause electric current to be generated, which is sent through wiring to inverter AC Loads Inverter synchronized with the grid Grid and reduces Grid power usage to the Loads Inverter 12
    • 13. Key Differences between Two Systems Feature Grid Tie System Working Pumps directly into grid Manager Solar, Battery, Load and Grid Storage None - Separate Home Inverter System needed Battery Bank to store extra power Costs Cheaper due to simpler inverter and no storage Higher due to more sophisticated solar inverter and storage Maintenance Less (no batteries) Backup Power August 2012 Off Grid System Higher (due to batteries) Must be another UPS or Part of the system DG Presentation to BESCOM by U-SOLAR 13
    • 14. Working of a Solar PV system – Hybrid System Electrons in upper layer of wafer substance get excited, causing voltage difference from lower layer of wafer Sun’s rays light up the upper layer of wafer substance in Solar PV cell module e In the event the Solar Power runs out, the AC Mains /GRID takes over AC The Sun + GRID Power Excess Power is fed back to the grid - The batteries supplies power to the inverter, which supplies AC to the loads Inverter Voltage difference between wafer layers in module cause s electric current to be generated, which is sent through cables to charge controller AC Loads Charge Controller Charge controller charges the batteries during sunlight and controls the charging levels Solar Power from the batteries is used as a “first priority” DC Loads are directly powered from the batteries 14
    • 15. System Components: Solar Panels • • • • • These are normally located on the roof of the building mounted on MS / Stainless Structures They can also be mounted on sloping roofs (tiled or otherwise) Ideally they should face the South, but East or West is also possible Approximate space is about 130 sqft / kw of installation They are interconnected to a certain voltage using special DC cables. The voltage depend on the configuration 15
    • 16. System Components: Inverter • The inverter is the “brains” behind the system and manages power from different source • A hybrid inverter marries different sources of power – solar, battery and grid and feeds the load • It senses the load requirements, the available Solar and Grid Power and feeds the load • The inverter must be rated to support the peak load of the facility • It can be programmed to maximize the use of solar power as well as provide backup 16 power
    • 17. System Components: Battery Bank • These are special Solar Lead Acid Batteries with special charging / discharging characteristics • These store the solar power for usage • The size of the storage is determined by the duration of backup power that is required • These need to be maintained with regular checkup (4 – 6 months) 17
    • 18. Agenda • Solar Thermal • Solar PV • Energizing Rooftops
    • 19. Thrust on Solar Energy in India Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission ( JNNSM) Key Highlights Key Highlights - Targets 20 GW of Solar Power generation by 2022 - 1st phase of JNNSM includes 200 MW of Roof top PV & - Targets 7 Mn. sq.m. of SWH installations by 2013 - 30% capital subsidy and/or soft loan option @5% interest rates *Generation Based Incentive 19
    • 20. Rooftop Solar: Net Metering is the Key Generate while the sun-shines and earn revenue. Draw from the grid when you need it 20
    • 21. The Importance of Net Metering • Zero liability on the Utility… ie. Government does not need to do anything other than define the specifications and framework  No Revenue outflow • Solar Power at Utility scale cannot compete with Coal / Hydel w/o government support… however.. • Solar Power at Retail level is now “grid competitive” – Commercial tariff in Karnataka @ 7.5 / kwh – Rooftop Solar can be made available at similar rates 21
    • 22. Urban Vision for Solar – “Net Zero” Homes • All Residential rooftops can have solar PV systems ranging from 1kw upwards • Simple Math: – 100,000 homes in Bangalore install an average of 2 kw each (total space per 2kw ~ 300 sqft) – Total installed capacity 200 MW – This is about 20 – 30% of Bangalore’s residential requirement • These generators will supply power to the grid during the day and draw back 22
    • 23. What is required from the Government • Enable net-metering policy – Define the standards and safety mechanisms – Define the process (who reads the meters, how, etc) – Define the billing mechanism [ No Cost to the Government] The rest will be taken care of by the citizens ! 23
    • 24. Net Metering Policies in India • Tamilnadu has allowed Net Metering since 2012 – However standards notified only in Nov ‘2013 – Applicable for residential customers • Andhra has allowed net metering now – Subsidy for residential customers • No proper news from Karnataka 24
    • 25. Capital Subsidy Info • For residential, only upto 1 kw, 30% subsidy was available (for commercial this is 100kw) • However, NO new projects have been approved since April 2013 • Some developers were offering system net of subsidy.. But that is now being withdrawn 25
    • 26. Mahalakshmi, HSR Layout [Bangalore]  PV Modules - 2kWp  Inverter - 2.6kVA  Battery Bank - 1200Ah
    • 27. BCIL, [Bangalore] Sadashiv Nagar office  PV Modules - 2kWp  Battery Bank - 600Ah Dodbellapur site  PV Modules - 2kWp  Inverter – 3 KVA  Battery Bank - 600Ah
    • 28. P G Ganapathy, Good Earth [Bangalore]  PV Modules - 1.4kWp  Inverter - 2.3kVA  Battery Bank - 800Ah
    • 29. Rajesh – Hulimavu [Bangalore]  PV Modules - 2kWp  Inverter – 3 kVA  Battery Bank - 800Ah
    • 30. Vishwannath Associates, Bangalore  PV Modules - 4 kWp  Inverter - 5kVA  Battery Bank - 720Ah
    • 31. Tribal Hospital [Gudalur, TN]  PV Modules – 7 kWp  Inverter – 2 x 3.7 kVA  Battery Bank - 2400Ah
    • 32. 25 Kw Westin Hotel, Mindspace [Hyderabad]
    • 33. Ananda Vikatan – 25 kw[Chennai]  PV Modules – 25 kWp  Inverter – 24 kw

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