<ul><li>Introducing all elements of the design chain reference model: Standard processes, metrics and best practices </li>...
DCOR Framework Overview <ul><li>Understand the History and Context of DCOR </li></ul><ul><li>Learn the Components of the D...
DCOR Framework Agenda <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introducing presenter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>History ...
Supply-Chain Council <ul><li>The SCC is an independent, not-for-profit, trade association </li></ul><ul><li>Membership ope...
DCOR History <ul><li>2002 : DCOR was developed by a small team at HP to resolve product design issues impacting supply cha...
Design Chain Customer processes Supplier processes Product/Portfolio Management Supply Chain SCOR ® Product Design   DCOR™...
Design Chain Processes Process, arrow indicates design materials flow direction Process, no design materials flow  Informa...
End-to-End storage human interface mp3 technology mp3 player web technology hard drive co. flash drive co. hard and flash ...
DCOR Hierarchy Standard DCOR definitions Company definitions Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Scope Configuration A...
Reading the DCOR Manual metrics category source of input destination of output Available on the Website R1.1 Schedule Rese...
Execution Processes Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes “ Supplier” processes Design ...
Capability Models Level: Different capabilities <ul><li>Product Refresh (R1, D1, I1) </li></ul><ul><li>Plan driven </li></...
Research (Level 1) <ul><li>Objective: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finding, testing and approving sources of materials, knowledge...
Research (Level 2) <ul><li>Research Product Refresh (R1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The ongoing research (and supplier relation...
Research (Level 3) Product Refresh (R1) New Product (R2) New Technology (R3) R1.1 Schedule Research Activities R2.1 Receiv...
Design (Level 1) <ul><li>Objectives: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decomposition of the (new) product requirements and design of t...
Design (Level 2) <ul><li>Design Product Refresh (D1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan-driven scheduled update of an existing pro...
Design (Level 3) Product Refresh (D1) New Product (D2) New Technology (D3) D2.1 Receive Validate and Decompose  D3.1 Recei...
Integrate (Level 1) <ul><li>Objective: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preparing the company for new or changed product. This includ...
Integrate (Level 2) <ul><li>Integrate Product Refresh (I1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Replace an existing product. Examples: mi...
Integrate (Level 3) Product Refresh (I1) New Product (I2) New Technology (I3) I1.1 Receive & Validate Request  I2.1 Receiv...
Planning Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Plan Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” pro...
Plan (Process ID: P) <ul><li>Objectives of this process: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The process of determining requirements and...
Plan Configurations (1/3) <ul><li>Plan Design Chain (Process ID: PP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning overall design chain t...
Plan Configurations (2/3) <ul><li>Plan Research (Process ID: PR) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The planning and coordination of th...
Plan Configurations (3/3) <ul><li>Plan Integrate (Process ID: PI) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The planning and coordination of t...
Plan Process Elements (1/2) Plan Design Chain (PP) Plan Research (PR) Plan Design (PD) PP.1 Gather Design Chain Requiremen...
Plan Process Elements (2/2) Plan Integrate (PI) Plan Amend (PA) PI.1 Gather Integration Requirements PA.1 Gather Amend Req...
Enable Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Plan Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” proce...
Enable Processes <ul><li>Objective:  The Enable processes are five groups of processes under Plan, Research, Design, Integ...
Enable Categories <ul><li>Enable Plan (Process ID: EP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance, data and relationship management...
Enable Categories <ul><li>Enable Integrate (Process ID: EI) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance, data and relationship manag...
All Enable processes Manage Risk will be EP.9, ER.9, ED.9 EI.9 and EA.9 in next release...  Financial Plan alignment will ...
Reverse Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes...
Reverse Flow: Amend <ul><li>Objective of this process: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolving design issues and supporting design...
Amend Configurations <ul><li>Amend Product Fall Out (Process ID: A1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The product cannot be manufactu...
Amend Process Elements Product Fall Out (A1) Deficient Product (A2) Product Specs (A3) A1.1 Receive & Validate  Issue A2.1...
DCOR Metrics <ul><li>Definitions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance Attribute : a characteristic to describe a strategy. P...
Performance Attributes Question: What are the most important attributes for your design chain? Attribute Strategy Reliabil...
DCOR KPIs; Strategic Metrics Attribute Strategic Metric Reliability Perfect Product Design Responsiveness Design Chain Cyc...
Strategic Reliability Metric Metric: Perfect Product Design Definition: The ability of the design chain to deliver product...
Strategic Responsiveness Metric Metric: Design Chain Cycle Time Definition: The average speed at which a design chain gene...
Strategic Agility Metric Metric: Product Design Change Cycle Time Definition: Time to change a product design after it has...
Strategic Cost Metric Metric: Total Design Chain Cost Definition: The costs associated with operating the design chain. Ca...
Strategic Asset Metric Metric: Design Chain Fixed Assets Value Definition: The total value of all design chain assets Calc...
Recap: DCOR Background <ul><li>Originally developed by Hewlett-Packard </li></ul><ul><li>Adopted by Supply-Chain Council <...
Recap: Process Framework <ul><li>Process Framework components and benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Processes defined </li></ul>...
Recap: Key DCOR Processes <ul><li>Planning and control processes: </li></ul><ul><li>Plan Design Chain; Drive overall plan ...
Recap: Process Configuration <ul><li>Categories: </li></ul><ul><li>Product Refresh; Existing products, small change </li><...
Recap: Key DCOR Metrics <ul><li>Metric Types </li></ul><ul><li>Reliability; Perfect Product Design </li></ul><ul><li>Respo...
Introduction to DCOR 2.0 <ul><li>Highlight the differences between the first release of DCOR and the next release </li></u...
DCOR 2.O Demo <ul><li>http://scc-aris.eiisolutions.net:8080/businesspublisher/ </li></ul><ul><li>Userid: Guest  Password: ...
DCOR 2.O Call for Volunteers Volunteers are needed:  Process Team  – Review and revise the Processes,  inputs and outputs ...
<ul><li>www.supply-chain.org </li></ul><ul><li>www.scorlabs.org </li></ul>This presentation is the exclusive property of t...
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  • The last 3 bullets: We will give you a feel how to use the DCOR framework for improvement projects.
  • This slide highlights the current state of affairs of the supply-chain council (2006-2007). Instructors can highlight additional information as appropriate, including industries covered (from Oil and Gas to Automotive to Aerospace), sectors (Private, Defense, Governmental, Educational Institutions). Another point which can be supplied is that council members in two recent studies have outperformed their peers both in revenue and profit (2003 study) as well as outperformed the DOW and S&amp;P 500 Stock indicators in the united states (2003-2006 benchmark). The council itself is a non-for-profit institution run by and for it’s membership. Structurally, it has a board of directors, day-to-day operations managed through an association management agency, and as well numerous committees and groups – Training and Education oversaw the development of this material, the Technical Development and Steering Committee (TDSC) researches, improves, and adjusts the framework content, variouis SIG’s (Special Industry Groups) look at specific application and practices with SCOR for their areas, and then committees also look at the function of the council – Legal, Marketing, and Financial oversight. It’s just like a company, but there are no ‘owners’. 2006-2007 represents the 10 th anniversary of the Council.
  • For HP it started during the Compaq/HP merger planning. The supply chain IT team used SCOR and managed to make post-merger supply-chain decisions clean, fast and without major political issues. The product management organizations needed much longer and more difficulties to make post-merger process decisions and obtain approvals.
  • Purpose : Explain the boundaries of DCOR DCOR is positioned between product management and sales and support and supply-chain. Product management: These are the processes that manage the life-cycle of the product, this is where the product is incepted or idea-ated. Sales and Support: The processes that manage the customers and provide customer support Supply-chain: The processes that source and/or generate and deliver the product or service to customers Interactions are multi-directional. Please note the picture represents processes not departments or organizations. Note: Focus on the design chain, use the scenario provided as part of the trainer package. List of activities by domain: Product/Portfolio Management Ideation or inception Define offerings (a product as an answer to a customer need) Manage product life cycle (includes creating launch and discontinuation plans Manage pricing Request and Approve designs Drive plans of DCOR, CCOR and SCOR Product Design Decompose offerings into technical descriptions Design supply-chain network, support networks, etc Ensure the product can be build, shipped, sold, serviced, repaired, disposed, etc Customer Chain Identify key customers Initiate and maintain relationships Understand customer needs and explain the value of your products to meet these needs Propose and close contracts Receive and route support requests, repair products Supply chain Fulfill customer orders Manufacture products Deliver services Pull and receive materials Return products and materials
  • Purpose : Explain the boundaries of DCOR Notes: The examples here are for products, however the design chain does also apply to services. Please note the picture represents processes not departments. Flows are bi-directional It IS: Costing the product or service Designing or re-using supply chains Designing service delivery processes and practices Technical specification design Finding and approving suppliers Validating materials, prototyping and piloting the product Inventions and patents AND productizing them It is NOT: Market sizing Market positioning of a product Pricing the product Total life cycle management -&gt; It is actively executing elements of the life cycle of the product
  • This is a very limited example as there are many more aspects included in the design of a mp3 player. The picture does show how each column uses the same processes: Plan, Research, Design and Integrate. Suppliers can be other organizations w/i your company, other companies, etc, and can include patent owning companies, sub contractors, suppliers and customers.
  • Impact of a significant change by level: Level 1 = 10,000; design outsourcing/insourcing decisions Level 2 = 100; consolidation of labs or research groups Level 3 = 10; new ways for prototyping or piloting builds Level 4 = 1; changing peoples tasks Level 5 = 0.1; changing the format of a message Six sigma projects mostly operate at level 4. DCOR projects operate at Level 1-3, that&apos;s why DCOR projects are much more profitable.
  • Other frameworks may have one or more of these elements, but all lack the connectivity between inputs, outputs, activity, metrics and best practices.
  • Explain this is not an organization chart. Nor does the position of the process elements (Plan, Research, Design, Integrate, Amend) indicate importance or sequence. Product definitions: product dimensions, dangerous goods classification, drawings, schematics, etc. Procedures and methods: Manufacturing routing and assembly instructions; Maintenance and repair processes Rules: Approved vendors, Bills of materials, etc. Basically it is defining and implementing a new product in your company.
  • The pictures on the right are example configurations. More on configurations later in the workshop. Examples discrete industries: Product refresh: Model year for cars, new and improved formula in detergents, memory/storage upgrade MP3 player or computer New Product: New model (another model on an established or new platform), new brand introduction (same product different packaging, different distribution channel) new model positioned above, below or between two existing MP3 player or computer models (i.e. Value line and Expert line, insert Power line). New Technology: Hybrid power train, silver particles detergent, the transfer from walkman (cassette tape or CD) to MP3 player. Services industry: Product refresh: Revised car insurance terms, refinement to consulting delivery (new templates, etc). New product: Car insurance adding boat insurance, extension of industry specific consulting New Technology: Financial planning (insurance, retirement, investments, total package)
  • Many components, products and services are researched. Most never make it as or into a final product/service for your company. The comparative research ensures the right product, service, technology is chosen. Right means based on your companies priorities: low price, best value, best performance, etc.
  • R1: Keeping abreast with the technological develops in the market. Continuous understanding of the latest versions of ones &amp;quot;commodity&amp;quot;. Closely following publications from research institutions. &amp;quot;Knowing your field&amp;quot;. R2: For a specific design researching and/or influencing the design of a specific component of your product (whether it is a tangible product or service) R3: Researching new techniques –such as business process management, manufacturing techniques etc. Be aware: This is new technology to you. It maybe well established outside your company or industry.
  • Purpose of slide: Show commonality and difference of Level 2 processes
  • Purpose of slide: Introduce the meaning of Design (w/i DCOR framework) Everybody understands design as the technical/physical object design. This is true but incomplete. No product can be designed without designing how it is made, distributed, maintained or disposed of. This is not a trivial statement. It means supply chain design is a design chain PROCESS. A reminder: we talk about processes here; the person that does supply chain network edsign may report into an organization called &apos;manufacturing&apos;, &apos;procurement&apos; or &apos;supply chain operations&apos;.
  • Purpose of slide: Explain different level 2 Design processes Explain how designs can be put into inventory: Product refresh This is obviously not possible or feasible for New Technology.
  • Purpose of slide: Show commonality and difference of Level 2 processes
  • Purpose of slide: Introduce the meaning of Integrate A typical example of the importance of Integrate. The design process generates what is called a engineering BOM; a bill-of-materials that contains EVERY component of the product, including historic and/or alternative sources for the same components or functionality. An engineering BOM is not usable in planning processes as not all parts are included in the planning process. (E.g. so called drip parts are normally only forecasted at the bulk level not the discrete level). Alternative parts are not included as they may never be activated, historic components are of no interest for the next x months forecast. The Integrate process will lift the engineering BOM and translate it to a planning BOM. Similarly BOMs are created for manufacturing (read: Make) processes, maintenance and repair processes, etc. The linkage to the SCOR processes is through for example Enable Make for the manufacturing BOM. The EM.1 process releases the manufacturing BOM that has been created as part of the Integrate process at the appropriate time to the Make processes – ensuring life cycle management objectives are supported. Note: Most supply chain problems with &amp;quot;design&amp;quot; originate in poor, malfunctioning or disconnected Integrate processes.
  • Purpose of slide: Differentiate between Level 2 Integrate processes Product refresh: Important to stipulate: These are planned events. The car industry is a good example. They come out with a new model year every year. (value for consumer difficult to find – yet this is can be a major design and integrate exercise). New product: A more significant change to products. Introducing a whole new model for cars. Souring a new type of weapons system in the military. Launching a whole new service (e.g. adding identity theft insurance to existing offerings – home/car/etc). Training is minimal, same type of processes, different content. New Technology: Significant infrastructural impact. Significant training impact. Most innovative.
  • Purpose of slide: Show commonality and difference of Level 2 processes Message: Very similar processes at level 3, however more steps when moving from left to right. Technically Establish Execution Process (I3.5) happens for Product refresh and New product too. However, the changes in the execution processes is minimal and therefore it is more verification and republication and thus part of (I1.3 andI2.4).
  • Explain this is not an organization chart. Nor does the position of the process elements (Plan, Research, Design, Integrate, Amend) indicate importance or sequence. Product definitions: product dimensions, dangerous goods classification, drawings, schematics, etc. Procedures and methods: Manufacturing routing and assembly instructions; Maintenance and repair processes Rules: Approved vendors, Bills of materials, etc. Basically it is defining and implementing a new product in your company.
  • Purpose of slide: Role of Plan Design Chain (compared to other planning processes) In supply-chain this is highly optimized and automated for most companies. In the design-chain space this may not be the case. Generally this is more the managerial prioritization of projects. Explain the levels of planning from Plan Design-Chain down to the scheduling of activities: Plan Design-Chain is comparable to managing the overall budget. Plan Research, Plan Design and Plan Integrate is comparable to managing departmental budgets. Scheduling in the execution processes (Research, Design and Integrate) is project planning.
  • The critical information to convey in this slide is the difference in treatment of the customer order in the three configurations Stock model handles the matchup of a customer order to stock material. Make-to-order model passes the customer order into manufacturing and procurement processes Engineered model passes not only the order (SKU) but also the requirements into manufacturing and procurement. The retail model is a specialized sequence of deliver steps for use within the four-walls retail environment, which can be substantially different than the other deliver models. Encourage the class to discuss these difference within their own companies.
  • Link the orange to the bottom of the quick reference.
  • Provide examples of each type of enable processes: Business rules: Number of suppliers per part (dual sourcing to avoid risk) Black lists (suppliers not allowed to do business with – non-regulatory) Decision support criteria Performance: Measuring performance Courses of action to achieve targeted performance Information: Establish rules and systems for archiving data Maintenance processes for data collection Includes backups etc. Note: The actual process data is collected inside the execution and planning processes Product Life Cycle: Maintenance of life cycle information in Design-Chain systems Capital assets: Acquire, maintain and retire capital assets Assets include: Buildings, test tracks, may include software (if capitalized), laboratories, etc Network: Maintaining the supplier, laboratory, support network Includes: Managing the Design-Chain workflow Knowledge transfer: Establishment, maintenance and application of methods and tools to transfer knowledge throughout the organization. This includes training programs, communication methods/blasts and information systems to support the communication of new product and product update related changes for the organization. Regulatory compliance: Monitoring and enforcement of regulatory requirements: Includes: environmental, labor, trade, copyright (internal enforcement) and other regulatory requirements such as blacklisted countries Alignment to Financial Plan: Ensure Design-Chain plans are aligned to the financial plans of the company Intellectual property: Monitoring and enforcing the capturing and protection of the companies intellectual properties. Patent management Copyright (external enforcement)
  • Purpose of slide : Introducing Amend process and different types of Amend processes (Level 2) Not manufacturable or fulfillable: The product cannot be made as per the design. Incomplete/inaccurate bills-of-materials and vendor (quality) issues are typical manufacturing examples. In fulfillment typical examples are: spare part availability, boxes don&apos;t fit on pallet, in truck, through door-ways, and packaging failure in normal handling. A third area is the lack of specifications for sales and after-sales processes. Not according to specifications: The product specifications such as temperature, wear and tear, color, battery life, noise levels, emissions, etc, aren&apos;t met. These &apos;Quality issues&apos; may be observed in the supply chain or in the field To support orders: The product needs to be modified in support of (engineer-to-order) orders. This is the link between engineer-to-order engineering and product engineering.
  • ECN = Engineering Change Notification SCO = Specification Change Order
  • Purpose of slide : Introduce the types of metrics (performance attribute, metric, measurement) Performance attribute: Categorization of metrics. Different metrics can indicate the performance for a certain performance attribute. Metric: The definition of a performance indicator. The DCOR metrics are design-process operational. Measurement: The observed value. Reliability : The ability of the design chain to deliver product designs which meet the following standards: - Delivered to operations by commit date - Assembly and Process Documentation complete - BOM complete and accurate - Manufacturing Readiness Status and Risk Assessment complete - Learning products plan complete - Patent disclosures complete - Product certifications complete - Product test report complete Responsiveness : The speed at which a design chain provides products to the customer. Flexibility : The ability of the design chain to respond to unplanned events. Examples of unplanned events are product quality issues, operational disturbance due to earthquakes, supplier bankruptcy, etc, and budget and/or headcount changes (R&amp;D budget) Cost : The costs associated with operating the design chain. Assets : The effectiveness of an organization in managing assets to support design chain operations. This includes the management of all assets: fixed and working capital.
  • Purpose of slide : Introduce the types of metrics (performance attribute, metric, measurement) Performance attribute: Categorization of metrics. Different metrics can indicate the performance for a certain performance attribute. Metric: The definition of a performance indicator. The DCOR metrics are design-process operational. Measurement: The observed value. Reliability : The ability of the design chain to deliver product designs which meet the following standards: - Delivered to operations by commit date - Assembly and Process Documentation complete - BOM complete and accurate - Manufacturing Readiness Status and Risk Assessment complete - Learning products plan complete - Patent disclosures complete - Product certifications complete - Product test report complete Responsiveness : The speed at which a design chain provides products to the customer. Flexibility : The ability of the design chain to respond to unplanned events. Examples of unplanned events are product quality issues, operational disturbance due to earthquakes, supplier bankruptcy, etc, and budget and/or headcount changes (R&amp;D budget) Cost : The costs associated with operating the design chain. Assets : The effectiveness of an organization in managing assets to support design chain operations. This includes the management of all assets: fixed and working capital.
  • This metric is the product of it&apos;s children. This means that the scores for lower level metrics are multiplied to find the perfect design % per design. Perfect Product Design averages the completed designs. The child metrics and the metric itself either score 0 or 1 at the project level. You are either on-time (1) or late (0). (being a bit late is like being a bit pregnant). The children are not parts of the performance (the sum of) but each metric can cause the level 1 metric to score 0 (at the design level).
  • This is the average time it takes to launch product change, new product or new technology. Each of these may have different cycle time targets. An example in the computer industry the Product refresh cycles are 3 months, new products are launched every year, new technology every few years. Automotive industry: Refresh: annually, new model: every 5 years, new technology: once in a while.
  • The simple description is: &amp;quot;time it takes to recover from a disaster&amp;quot;. Discuss the scenario of a bankruptcy. What happens? What needs to be done? How long would it take in your company?
  • Total cost of operating the design chain. This can also be expressed as an average cost per design: Divide the total design chain cost by the total number of designs. Benchmark data: This is the only metric that has a metric that can be found for public companies (10-K). The total R&amp;D cost or &apos;R&amp;D investment&apos; is a good indicator for the total design chain cost. (Missing are generally the Integrate Cost). Show some example 10-K reports (for the companies in the training and their industries). Discuss the R&amp;D cost versus the definition of Total Design Chain Cost for your company.
  • The total value of the design chains fixed (or capitalized) assets. This includes laboratories, laboratory equipment, software (if capitalized), buildings, etc. Note: This metric is more commonly measured as a percentage of revenue.
  • What it is not: Process: We hope you understand now that the process elements are not the standard or obligatory process map of your company. Use the objects to describe your processes. Metrics: Measure those that make sense for your business (models) Best practices: Review feasibility of the best practices for your company, use it as a list of suggestions
  • Plan processes: position resources and funds Enable processes: prepare and monitor Execution processes: deliver refreshed and new products and new technology products Reverse processes: corrective action
  • Reliability: Strict metric on truly perfect execution of designs Responsiveness: The repeated time to deliver designs Flexibility: Time needed to recover from disasters (product recalls, budget reductions, etc). Cost: Total cost to operate the design chain Assets: Total value of design chain assets
  • This presentation is the exclusive property of the Supply ...

    1. 1. <ul><li>Introducing all elements of the design chain reference model: Standard processes, metrics and best practices </li></ul><ul><li>Provide insight into the next release of the DCOR model </li></ul>DCOR Framework Overview and Update This presentation is the exclusive property of the Supply Chain Council.  Copyright © Supply Chain Council. 2009. All rights reserved.  The marks SCOR®, CCOR™, DCOR™ and SCOR Roadmap™ are the exclusive property of the Supply Chain Council.
    2. 2. DCOR Framework Overview <ul><li>Understand the History and Context of DCOR </li></ul><ul><li>Learn the Components of the DCOR Framework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Process Nomenclature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Process Metrics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Process Best Practices </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Understand how to model a design-chain with DCOR </li></ul><ul><li>Understand how to characterize a design-chain with DCOR metrics </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the differences between the first release of DCOR and the next release </li></ul><ul><li>Show you the next release with a demo </li></ul><ul><li>Seek volunteers to review the forthcoming release </li></ul>
    3. 3. DCOR Framework Agenda <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introducing presenter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>History of DCOR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Positioning the Design Chain process domain </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DCOR Processes, Modeling and Metrics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Execution Processes (Research, Design and Integrate) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning and Control Processes (Plan and Enable) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reverse Flow Processes (Amend) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Modeling with DCOR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic Metrics (KPIs) </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Supply-Chain Council <ul><li>The SCC is an independent, not-for-profit, trade association </li></ul><ul><li>Membership open to all companies and organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Focus is on research, application and advancement and advancing state-of-the-art supply chain management systems and practices </li></ul><ul><li>Developer and endorser of the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR ® ) as a cross-industry standard for supply chain management </li></ul><ul><li>Offers Training, Certification, Benchmarking, Research, Team Development, Coaching, and Cross-standard Integration focused on the SCOR ® framework </li></ul><ul><li>Founded in 1996, Approaching 1000 Association Members </li></ul><ul><li>Chapters in North America, Europe, Japan, South Africa, Latin America, Australia/New Zealand, South East Asia and Greater China, with developing Chapters India and Middle East </li></ul>Driving value through the use of SCOR®
    5. 5. DCOR History <ul><li>2002 : DCOR was developed by a small team at HP to resolve product design issues impacting supply chain operational execution. </li></ul><ul><li>2003 : HP validates and refines DCOR framework on internal projects. </li></ul><ul><li>2004 : Hewlett-Packard conveys DCOR to Supply-Chain Council in order to enrich and expand the model. (HP's model does not include transferable best practices). </li></ul><ul><li>2005 : SCC DCOR project team established. </li></ul><ul><li>2006 : SCC releases DCOR release 1.0. This includes best practices, revamped metrics and a 3 rd Amend process. </li></ul><ul><li>2008 : SCC started revision of DCOR release 2.0. </li></ul><ul><li>A discussion of enhancements to the model will be at the end of this presentation. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Design Chain Customer processes Supplier processes Product/Portfolio Management Supply Chain SCOR ® Product Design DCOR™ Sales & Support CCOR™ Customer processes Supplier processes Product/Portfolio Management Supply Chain SCOR ® Product Design DCOR™ Sales & Support CCOR™
    7. 7. Design Chain Processes Process, arrow indicates design materials flow direction Process, no design materials flow Information flow Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes “ Supplier” processes Design Chain Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Plan
    8. 8. End-to-End storage human interface mp3 technology mp3 player web technology hard drive co. flash drive co. hard and flash co. internal labs. online music store integrate design research integrate design research integrate design research
    9. 9. DCOR Hierarchy Standard DCOR definitions Company definitions Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Scope Configuration Activity Workflow Transactions Differentiates Business Differentiates Complexity Names Tasks Sequences Steps Links Transactions Defines Scope Differentiates Capabilities Links, Metrics, Tasks and Practices Job Details Details of Automation Framework Language Framework Language Framework Language Industry or Company Specific Language Technology Specific Language R1 Research Product Refresh Design Chain Research R1.2 Source Materials EDI XML
    10. 10. Reading the DCOR Manual metrics category source of input destination of output Available on the Website R1.1 Schedule Research Activities: Process Element Description/Definition: Scheduling and managing the execution of the individual deliveries of materials and technology. The requirements are determined based on the detailed Research plan. This includes the identification and validation of potential suppliers of materials or technology. inputs best practices outputs outputs process
    11. 11. Execution Processes Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes “ Supplier” processes Design Chain Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Plan
    12. 12. Capability Models Level: Different capabilities <ul><li>Product Refresh (R1, D1, I1) </li></ul><ul><li>Plan driven </li></ul><ul><li>Minor changes to the product </li></ul><ul><li>Short turn-around times </li></ul><ul><li>New Product (R2, D2, I2) </li></ul><ul><li>Market driven </li></ul><ul><li>Significant change in product (line) </li></ul><ul><li>Longer turn-around times </li></ul><ul><li>New Technology (R3, D3, I3) </li></ul><ul><li>Market and technology driven </li></ul><ul><li>Significant change to product and production processes </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic change, long lead-times </li></ul>
    13. 13. Research (Level 1) <ul><li>Objective: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finding, testing and approving sources of materials, knowledge and technology for products or services. This includes collecting and archiving specifications of parts, obtaining (new) manufacturing, delivery and/or sales techniques, and identification and verification of (sub-) contractors. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keywords: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology/knowledge/product trends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supplier identification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supplier and component verification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Documentation of form/fit/function </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Research (Level 2) <ul><li>Research Product Refresh (R1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The ongoing research (and supplier relationships) for existing products, components and services. This includes updating internal documentation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research New Product (R2) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The research of a new product, component, or service. A new product is a product similar to existing products and is generally based on the same technology. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research New Technology (R3) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research new technology. This includes both emerging technology as well as a established technology that may be new to your company. Technology includes techniques for manufacturing or services delivery. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Research (Level 3) Product Refresh (R1) New Product (R2) New Technology (R3) R1.1 Schedule Research Activities R2.1 Receive and Validate Request R3.1 Receive and Validate Request R3.2 Identify Sources for Technology R2.2 Schedule Research Activities R3.3 Schedule Research Activities R1.2 Source Materials R2.3 Source Materials R3.4 Source Materials/ Technology R3.5 Establish Verification Process R1.3 Verify Materials R2.4 Verify Materials R3.6 Verify Materials/ Technology R1.4 Transfer Findings/ Materials R2.5 Transfer Findings/ Materials R3.7 Transfer Findings/ Materials R1.5 Authorize Supplier Payment R2.6 Authorize Supplier Payment R3.8 Authorize Supplier Payment
    16. 16. Design (Level 1) <ul><li>Objectives: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decomposition of the (new) product requirements and design of the product or service. This includes developing and testing prototypes. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keywords: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prototypes ('laboratory' environment) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical drawings/Specifications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Form, fit and function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Product/service costing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manufacturing process design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supply chain process design* (DfSC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service and support process design </li></ul></ul>DfSC = Design for Supply Chain and other Design for’s: Manufacture, Repair, Reliability, etc
    17. 17. Design (Level 2) <ul><li>Design Product Refresh (D1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan-driven scheduled update of an existing product or service. The existing product specifications are refreshed, no significant redesign activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Design New Product (D2) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The grounds-up or significant redesign of a product or service. The product or service is build on an existing technology </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Design New Technology (D3) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Design new technology. This includes technology that is new to your company. Technology includes techniques for manufacturing or services delivery. </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Design (Level 3) Product Refresh (D1) New Product (D2) New Technology (D3) D2.1 Receive Validate and Decompose D3.1 Receive Validate and Decompose D1.1 Schedule Design Activities D2.2 Schedule Design Activities D3.2 Schedule Design Activities D3.3 Acquire Knowledge D1.2 Develop Prototype/ Model D2.3 Develop Prototype D3.4 Develop Prototype D1.3 Build and Test Prototype D2.4 Build and Test Prototype D3.5 Build and Test Prototype D1.4 Package Design D2.5 Package Design D3.6 Package Design D1.5 Release Design to Integrate D2.6 Release Design to Integrate D3.7 Release Design to Integrate
    19. 19. Integrate (Level 1) <ul><li>Objective: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preparing the company for new or changed product. This includes distributing the information, such as contracts, work-instructions, business rules and goals, throughout the company: supply-chain, sales, service and support. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keywords: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pilot builds ('production' environment), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Readiness (company operations), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Product transition, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Product roll-out and migration plans </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Integrate (Level 2) <ul><li>Integrate Product Refresh (I1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Replace an existing product. Examples: minor revision of a car (new model year), upgrade of standard specs of consumer products such as appliances, electronics and personal computers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Integrate New Product (I2) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The roll-out of a new product. Significant change in workflow, instructions, bills-of-materials/recipes. Normally not a significant change in production and/or test equipment. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Integrate New Technology (I3) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Launching new products which contain or require new technology. A significant change in production and testing equipment, training and change in procedures. </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Integrate (Level 3) Product Refresh (I1) New Product (I2) New Technology (I3) I1.1 Receive & Validate Request I2.1 Receive & Validate Request I3.1 Receive & Validate Request I1.2 Decompose Request I2.2 Decompose Request I3.2 Decompose Request I2.3 Distribute Requirements I3.3 Distribute Requirements I1.3 Obtain & Validate Design I2.4 Receive & Validate Design I3.4 Receive & Validate Design I3.5 Establish Execution Processes I1.4 Pilot Design I2.5 Pilot Design I3.6 Pilot Design I1.5 Package Product I2.6 Package Product I3.7 Package Product I1.6 Release Product I2.7 Release Product I3.8 Release Product
    22. 22. Planning Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Plan Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes “ Supplier” processes Design Chain Processes
    23. 23. Plan (Process ID: P) <ul><li>Objectives of this process: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The process of determining requirements and corrective actions to achieve design chain objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key Processes Comprehended: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Design chain planning/forecasting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research requirement planning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilities capacity planning (Laboratories, Pilots in Production) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage planning parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hint: Budgeting or Roadmap planning? Probably Plan in DCOR </li></ul>
    24. 24. Plan Configurations (1/3) <ul><li>Plan Design Chain (Process ID: PP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning overall design chain targets. Plan Design Chain drives and coordinates Research, Design, Integrate and Amend plans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compare to “R&D Budget” in certain industries </li></ul></ul>Plan Integrate Plan Design Plan Research Plan Design Chain Integrate Design Research Design-Chain coordination Process resources planning Activity scheduling and execution
    25. 25. Plan Configurations (2/3) <ul><li>Plan Research (Process ID: PR) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The planning and coordination of the Research execution activities. This includes assigning and prioritizing research and laboratory staff to specific projects and positioning capacity for Research activities. Plan Research may trigger research activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan Design (Process ID: PD) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The planning and coordination of the Design execution activities. This includes assigning and prioritizing prototyping and laboratory staff to specific projects and positioning capacity for Design activities. </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Plan Configurations (3/3) <ul><li>Plan Integrate (Process ID: PI) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The planning and coordination of the Integration execution activities. This includes scheduling and prioritizing pilot builds and training and positioning capacity for Integrate activities - planning for pilot builds on ‘production’ lines. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan Amend (Process ID: PA) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The planning and coordination of the Amend activities. This includes prioritization of resources to support resolution of design issues, recalls and other product or process quality related issues. </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Plan Process Elements (1/2) Plan Design Chain (PP) Plan Research (PR) Plan Design (PD) PP.1 Gather Design Chain Requirements PR.1 Gather Research Requirements P3.1 Gather Design Requirements PP.2 Gather Design Chain Resources PR.2 Gather Research Resources P3.2 Gather Design Resources PP.3 Balance Design Chain Resources with Requirements PR.3 Balance Research Resources with Requirements P3.3 Balance Design Resources with Requirements PP.4 Establish & Communicate Design Chain Plans PR.4 Establish & Communicate Research Plans P3.4 Establish & Communicate Design Plans
    28. 28. Plan Process Elements (2/2) Plan Integrate (PI) Plan Amend (PA) PI.1 Gather Integration Requirements PA.1 Gather Amend Requirements PI.2 Gather Integration Resources PA.2 Gather Amend Resources PI.3 Balance Integration Resources with Requirements PA.3 Balance Amend Resources with Requirements PI.4 Establish & Communicate Integration Plans PA.4 Establish & Communicate Amend Plans
    29. 29. Enable Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Plan Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes “ Supplier” processes Design Chain Processes
    30. 30. Enable Processes <ul><li>Objective: The Enable processes are five groups of processes under Plan, Research, Design, Integrate and Amend with 3 distinct types of objectives: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage process performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage process control data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage process relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key processes comprehended: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Managing business rules and monitoring adherence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Measuring design chain performance and determine corrective action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managing supplier and service provider relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managing the design chain network and facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hint: Documentation management? Probably Enable </li></ul>
    31. 31. Enable Categories <ul><li>Enable Plan (Process ID: EP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance, data and relationship management processes for all types of planning processes: Plan Design Chain, Plan research, Plan Design, Plan Integrate and Plan Amend. Examples: maintain planning cycles and processes, monitor planning accuracy. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enable Research (Process ID: ER) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance, data and relationship management processes for all research partner and supplier related processes. Examples: Monitor supplier performance, maintain what knowledge is sourced where. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enable Design (Process ID: ED) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable management processes for prototyping and design activities. Examples: laboratory maintenance, monitoring laboratory capacity utilization/shortage. </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. Enable Categories <ul><li>Enable Integrate (Process ID: EI) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance, data and relationship management processes for all integration activities and pilot build related processes. Examples: Monitor pilot build performance, monitor health and safety compliance for pilotbuilds. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enable Amend (Process ID: ER) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable management processes for all types of reverse processes: Product fall-out, product deficiencies and specification changes. Examples: Maintain Amend approval rules, Maintain issue tracking software, maintain a network of production quality engineers. </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. All Enable processes Manage Risk will be EP.9, ER.9, ED.9 EI.9 and EA.9 in next release... Financial Plan alignment will become .10 Manage Business Rules EP.1 ER.1 ED.1 EI.1 EA.1 Manage Process Performance EP.2 ER.2 ED.2 EI.2 EA.2 Manage Process Information EP.3 ER.3 ED.3 EI.3 EA.3 Manage Product Life Cycle EP.4 ER.4 ED.4 EI.4 EA.4 Manage Design-Chain Capital Assets EP.5 ER.5 ED.5 EI.5 EA.5 Manage Knowledge Transfer EP.6 ER.6 ED.6 EI.6 EA.6 Manage Process Network EP.7 ER.7 ED.7 EI.7 EA.7 Manage Process Regulatory Compliance EP.8 ER.8 ED.8 EI.8 EA.8 Manage Financial Plan Alignment Manage Intellectual Property EP.9 ED.9 Plan Research Design Integrate Amend
    34. 34. Reverse Processes Integrate Design Research Amend Customer processes Supplier processes Supply Chain “ Customer” processes “ Supplier” processes Design Chain Processes Plan
    35. 35. Reverse Flow: Amend <ul><li>Objective of this process: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resolving design issues and supporting design adaptations (for product and processes designed and integrated). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key Processes Comprehended </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identification of the need to amend a product or process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Checking validity of request/need </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decide which team/organization needs to re-research, redesign and/or re-integrate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publish notifications and/or corrective actions to initiators/field </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hint: Design issue? Probably Amend in DCOR </li></ul>
    36. 36. Amend Configurations <ul><li>Amend Product Fall Out (Process ID: A1) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The product cannot be manufactured or fulfilled. Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vendor disappeared (earthquake, bankruptcy) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Component availability (single vs. dual sourcing) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dimensions not supported (too heavy, too tall) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Amend Deficient Product (Process ID: A2) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Product does not perform according to specifications. Examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Product 'quality' issues </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Repair volume increased observed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Product recalls </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Amend Product Specifications (Process ID: A3) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Product specification changes required to support orders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Primarily Engineer-to-Order orders (e.g. planes, trucks) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    37. 37. Amend Process Elements Product Fall Out (A1) Deficient Product (A2) Product Specs (A3) A1.1 Receive & Validate Issue A2.1 Obtain Deficiency Information A2.1 Obtain Specification Information A2.2 Validate Issue A2.2 Validate Issue A1.2 Decompose Issue A2.3 Decompose Issue A2.3 Decompose Issue A1.3 Distribute Issue A2.4 Distribute Issue A2.4 Distribute Issue A1.4 Publish Advisory (ECN) A2.5 Publish Advisory (ECN) A2.5 Publish Advisory (SCO)
    38. 38. DCOR Metrics <ul><li>Definitions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance Attribute : a characteristic to describe a strategy. Performance attributes serve as classification for KPIs and metrics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Key Performance Indicator (KPI): a metric that is representative to measure the overall performance or state-of-affairs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Metric : a standard for measurement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Measurement : an observation that reduces the </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>amount of uncertainty about the value of a quantity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DCOR metrics: Diagnostic metrics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Linked to business objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highlight the gap in performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change over time is more valuable than a single sample </li></ul></ul>38
    39. 39. Performance Attributes Question: What are the most important attributes for your design chain? Attribute Strategy Reliability Consistently getting the right product AND process design, meeting quality requirements and on-time completion of integration Responsiveness The consistent speed of designing and integrating new products/services Agility The ability to respond to unplanned events (incl. external influences and quality issues) Cost The cost associated with managing and operating the design chain Assets The effectiveness in managing the design chain’s assets in support of design and integration of new products
    40. 40. DCOR KPIs; Strategic Metrics Attribute Strategic Metric Reliability Perfect Product Design Responsiveness Design Chain Cycle Time Agility Product Design Chain Change Cycle Time Cost Total Design Chain Cost Assets Design Chain Fixed Assets Value
    41. 41. Strategic Reliability Metric Metric: Perfect Product Design Definition: The ability of the design chain to deliver product designs which meet the following standards: on-time, right product, complete documentation, supply-chain ready, product testing and certification complete Calculation: [Total perfect designs]/[Total designs] x 100% Perfect design = on-time request * certifications complete * documentation complete * manufacturing readiness and risk assessment complete * more.. L2 Metrics: (sample) <ul><li>% On-time to commit </li></ul><ul><li># of design errors </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation complete </li></ul><ul><li>Perfect Integration </li></ul>Notes: Perfect design is the product of lower level metrics For each design the value is either 0 or 100%
    42. 42. Strategic Responsiveness Metric Metric: Design Chain Cycle Time Definition: The average speed at which a design chain generates product designs. Calculation: [Sum of actual cycle times for all completed designs]/ [Total number of completed designs] Actual cycle time = time between receipt of design requirements and release of the product design to operations L2 Metrics: (sample) <ul><li>Research cycle time </li></ul><ul><li>Design cycle time </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate cycle time </li></ul>Notes: Consider the cycle time targets for different products and different technology life cycle phases
    43. 43. Strategic Agility Metric Metric: Product Design Change Cycle Time Definition: Time to change a product design after it has been released to operations. Calculation: [Sum of Amend cycle times]/[Total number of events] Amend cycle time = time between receipt of ECO requirements and release of the revised design to operations L2 Metrics: (sample) <ul><li>Pilot build time </li></ul><ul><li>Amend cycle time </li></ul><ul><li>Replan frequency </li></ul>Notes: <ul><li>Typical scenarios: </li></ul><ul><li>Supplier bankruptcy </li></ul><ul><li>Product recalls </li></ul><ul><li>The product has prior been released to operations </li></ul>RECALL
    44. 44. Strategic Cost Metric Metric: Total Design Chain Cost Definition: The costs associated with operating the design chain. Calculation: Sum of the cost to plan, research, design, integrate and amend. These are all costs associated with managing the design chain. (People, facilities, materials, etc.) L2 Metrics: (sample) <ul><li>Plan Cost </li></ul><ul><li>Research cost </li></ul><ul><li>Design cost </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate cost </li></ul><ul><li>Amend cost </li></ul>Notes: Compare: R&D Cost on the 10-K for public companies
    45. 45. Strategic Asset Metric Metric: Design Chain Fixed Assets Value Definition: The total value of all design chain assets Calculation: Sum of Plan, Research, Design, Integrate and Amend fixed asset values L2 Metrics: (sample) <ul><li>Plan Fixed Assets Value </li></ul><ul><li>Research Fixed Assets Value </li></ul><ul><li>Design Fixed Assets Value </li></ul><ul><li>Research Fixed Assets Value </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate Fixed Assets Value </li></ul><ul><li>Amend Fixed Assets Value </li></ul>Notes: Check Ex.5 Manage Fixed Asset processes
    46. 46. Recap: DCOR Background <ul><li>Originally developed by Hewlett-Packard </li></ul><ul><li>Adopted by Supply-Chain Council </li></ul><ul><li>First SCC release refined or added metrics, best practices and A3 Amend product specifications process </li></ul><ul><li>DCOR is founded on the SCOR framework architecture: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Input, process, output, planning and control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 pre-defined levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrated metrics, processes and best practices </li></ul></ul>
    47. 47. Recap: Process Framework <ul><li>Process Framework components and benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Processes defined </li></ul><ul><li>Metrics defined </li></ul><ul><li>Best practices identified </li></ul><ul><li>And relationships between these pre-defined </li></ul><ul><li>What it is not: </li></ul><ul><li>A pre-defined map of your company </li></ul><ul><li>A must-have list of metrics </li></ul><ul><li>A must-have list of practices </li></ul>
    48. 48. Recap: Key DCOR Processes <ul><li>Planning and control processes: </li></ul><ul><li>Plan Design Chain; Drive overall plan and budget </li></ul><ul><li>Plan Research, Plan Design, Plan Integrate, Plan Amend </li></ul><ul><li>Enable; Align resources and monitor performance </li></ul><ul><li>Execution processes: </li></ul><ul><li>Research; Collecting knowledge and parts </li></ul><ul><li>Design; Technical engineering and documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate; Prepare and release to operations </li></ul><ul><li>Reverse processes: </li></ul><ul><li>Amend; Correct research, design or integration flaws </li></ul>
    49. 49. Recap: Process Configuration <ul><li>Categories: </li></ul><ul><li>Product Refresh; Existing products, small change </li></ul><ul><li>New product; Existing technology, change to product </li></ul><ul><li>New Technology; New processes, significant change </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviors: </li></ul><ul><li>Life Cycle status of product determines which category </li></ul><ul><li>Different categories are measured differently </li></ul><ul><li>New technology products is partially new product and partially product refresh </li></ul><ul><li>New product is partially product refresh </li></ul>
    50. 50. Recap: Key DCOR Metrics <ul><li>Metric Types </li></ul><ul><li>Reliability; Perfect Product Design </li></ul><ul><li>Responsiveness; Design Chain Cycle Time </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility; Product Design Change Cycle Time </li></ul><ul><li>Cost; Total Design Chain Cost </li></ul><ul><li>Assets; Total Design Chain Fixed asset Value </li></ul><ul><li>Metrics and levels; </li></ul><ul><li>Set the scope using level 1 (strategic) metrics </li></ul><ul><li>Drill down to the root cause </li></ul><ul><li>Different process configurations make different measurements </li></ul>
    51. 51. Introduction to DCOR 2.0 <ul><li>Highlight the differences between the first release of DCOR and the next release </li></ul><ul><li>Show you the next release with a demo </li></ul><ul><li>Seek volunteers to review the forthcoming release </li></ul>
    52. 52. DCOR 2.O Demo <ul><li>http://scc-aris.eiisolutions.net:8080/businesspublisher/ </li></ul><ul><li>Userid: Guest Password: Houston </li></ul><ul><li>So what is new and different? </li></ul><ul><li>Revised to conform to look and feel of SCOR 9 </li></ul><ul><li>Five new process elements – Risk Management </li></ul><ul><li>New Metric Trees from L1 to L3 </li></ul><ul><li>Metrics </li></ul><ul><li> DCOR 1.0 In DCOR 2 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost 117 193 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Responsiveness 69 160 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Agility 10 123 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asset Management 11 37 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reliability 5 88 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Best Practices: 270 311 </li></ul><ul><li>Inputs/Outputs 115 223 </li></ul>
    53. 53. DCOR 2.O Call for Volunteers Volunteers are needed: Process Team – Review and revise the Processes, inputs and outputs Metrics Team – ensure that metrics are correct for each process, process category, process element and that the metric trees are Best Practices Team – Bi-Weekly conference calls with ECD of April 1. Use/Access to business process modeling tools.
    54. 54. <ul><li>www.supply-chain.org </li></ul><ul><li>www.scorlabs.org </li></ul>This presentation is the exclusive property of the Supply Chain Council.  Copyright © Supply Chain Council. 2009. All rights reserved.  The marks SCOR®, CCOR™, DCOR™ and SCOR Roadmap™ are the exclusive property of the Supply Chain Council. For follow-up questions about the DCOR ™ Model or the Supply Chain Council and its Products or Services: [email_address] For follow-up questions specific to the content and discussions of this Workshop: [email_address] 703 693 1685
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