Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The Toyota Production System A Transition from Mass Production to
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Toyota Production System A Transition from Mass Production to

1,232
views

Published on


1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • dear sir can i plz get a copyof this presentation . i shall be very thankful
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,232
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
69
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Toyota Production System A Transition from Mass Production to Lean Manufacturing and Supply Chain Management Genaro J. Gutiérrez McCombs School of Business The University of Texas at Austin Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce San Antonio, Texas April 15, 2003
  • 2. Major Revolutions in Manufacturing
    • 1776, Adam Smith “The Wealth of Nations”
    • 1910, Henry Ford and Mass Manufacturing.
    • 1980, The Toyota Production System.
      • Lean Manufacturing.
      • Supply Chain Management.
  • 3. The Gestation of TPS
    • Eiji Toyoda visit to Henry Ford’s factory in 1950.
    • The SMED (Single-digit in Minutes Exchange of Dice) program at the stamping plant.
    • Deming’s quality movement in Japan.
    • The Engineers: Taiichi Ohno and Shigeo Shingo
    • “ Japanese” Manufacturing hits America in 1970
  • 4. Main Features of TPS
    • Greater Product Variety
    • Fast Response (Flexibility)
    • “ Stable” Production Schedules
    • Supply Chain Integration
    • Demand Management
  • 5. Elements of TPS
    • The SMED Program.
    • Highlight Problems (Jidoka).
    • Gradual Elimination of Waste.
      • Continuous Improvement (Kaizen), Root-Cause Analysis (5-whys?) and Fool-proofing (Poka-Yoke).
    • Cross-Trained Workers.
    • Just-In-Time Production.
    • Stable Production Schedules (Heijunka)
  • 6. Traditional “Buffered” Supply Chain Assembler 2 nd Tier 1 st Tier Flow of Production Flow of Information Customer Demand
  • 7. The Just-in-Time Supply Chain: “Look Ma” No Stocks! Toyota 2 nd Tier 1 st Tier Flow of Production Flow of Information Customer Demand
  • 8. Expectations from Suppliers
    • Frequent deliveries.
    • Hours (not days) lead time.
    • Rapid response capability (not from stocks).
    • Delivery to assembly line at the right time in the right sequence without inspection.
    • Reliability (quality and timing).
  • 9. Supplier Relationships
    • Long-term, steady relationships with a few suppliers.
    • Negotiation based on a long term commitment to productivity and quality improvement.
    • Interested in supplier capabilities.
      • Continuous improvement.
      • Product/process technology.
      • Design for manufacturability.
  • 10. What’s in it for a supplier?
    • A Stable Manufacturing Environment.
      • Steady production volume.
    • Leaner Processes.
      • Cost/Flexibility/Quality
    • Profits.

×