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  • 1. Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Logistics and Supply Chain Operations (LSCO) Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Version 2009.1 Submitted to the Department of Logistics faculty on February 14, 2009 Submitted to the Dean of the College of Business and Public Policy on February 16, 2009 Submitted to the UAA Office of Academic Affairs (draft version) on February 16, 2009 AAS - LSCO Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Submitted 2-14-09 Page 1 of 11
  • 2. AAS - Logistics and Supply Chain Operations (LSCO) Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction....................................................................................................................................3 AAS - LSCO Learning Goals.........................................................................................................4 AAS - LSCO Measurable Learning Objectives.............................................................................5 Assessment Implementation & Analysis for Program Improvement.........................................10 General Implementation Strategy......................................................................................................10 Assessment Timetable.........................................................................................................................10 Modification of the Assessment Plan..................................................................................................11 Appendix A: Embedded Assessment Documents.......................................................................11 AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 2 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 3. Introduction Purpose. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for assessing the overall academic effectiveness of the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) – Logistics and Supply Chain Operations (LSCO) offered by the College of Business and Public Policy (CBPP). This document addresses the needs of accreditors, administrators, external stakeholders, students, and faculty. Accreditors set general standards including the requirement that actual results agree with the stated mission. Administrators are accountable for program effectiveness and need to know whether the program is delivering promised learning outcomes. External stakeholders value the program’s effectiveness and also require and deserve empirical assurance of learning. Students need to know what they can reasonably expect to achieve from their investment of time and money in the AAS - LSCO program. The faculty is responsible for instructional effectiveness and for making continuous improvements to the program based on the analysis of collected assessment data. Relationship to AACSB standards and terminology. While the AAS - LSCO is not accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB, www.aacsb.edu), some of the courses required for this program are also required for the CBPP’s Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree. In our attempt to keep all college assessment plans flexible yet consistent in terminology, we are including information regarding both AACSB standards and program definitions and their links to NWCCU standards. The AACSB utilizes the term learning goal: “the learning goals describe the desired educational accomplishments of the degree programs.”1 The AAS - LSCO learning goals are the equivalent of the program outcomes employed by UAA for accreditation by NWCCU. To avoid confusion, the AAS - LSCO faculty has decided to apply AACSB terminology throughout its assessment documentation. This plan and its language reflect that decision. AACSB UAA / NWCCU learning goal = program outcome Under AACSB standards, each learning goal must be supported by one to three measurable learning objectives. A learning objective must be directly measurable in a way that can be mapped into a “yes, they did it” or “no, they did not” outcome. While at least one assessment tool must be used to measure each objective, multiple tools are encouraged. Readers of this plan should note that the term “learning objective” employed by AACSB is not the same as the term “program objective” employed in some UAA assessment plans and documentation. AACSB also makes an important distinction between direct measures of learning and indirect measures. Alumni surveys or student self-assessments are examples of indirect measures. The AACSB regards these tools as supplementary.2 1 AACSB International. 2006. Eligibility Procedures and Accreditation Standards for Business Accreditation. http:// www.aacsb.edu/accreditation/business/STANDARDSJan06-draft2.pdf. Revised 1 January 2006. p. 57. 2 “As part of a comprehensive learning assessment program, schools may supplement direct measures of achievement with indirect measures. Such techniques as surveying alumni about their preparedness to enter the job market or surveying employers about the strengths and weaknesses of graduates can provide some information about AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 3 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 4. AAS - LSCO Learning Goals Learning goals (program outcomes) articulate what graduates should be able to do and/or what overall traits they should possess at the conclusion of the AAS - LSCO program. Upon graduation, AAS - LSCO program graduates will possess the following skills as defined by these AAS - LSCO Learning Goals. In addition to the general business knowledge and skills gained via the core business courses required for the LSCO program, students will specifically: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of logistics and supply chain operations in today’s business environment. 2. Perform inventory control analyses used to improve supply chain efficiency. 3. Demonstrate the impact of logistics and supply chain operations on an organization’s bottom line. 4. Demonstrate skills in data mining in supply chain topics and sources. 5. Explain the role of transportation in Alaska’s economy. 6. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively. perceptions of student achievement. Such indirect measures, however, cannot replace direct assessment of student performance. Often, schools find that alumni and employer surveys serve better as tools to gather knowledge about what is needed in the current workplace than as measures of student achievement. Such surveys can alert the school to trends, validate other sources of curriculum guidance, and maintain external relationships. By themselves, surveys are weak evidence for learning.” AACSB International. 2006. op. cit., p. 67. AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 4 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 5. AAS - LSCO Measurable Learning Objectives The achievement of each learning goal is measured by student achievement of specific and measurable learning objectives. The AAS - LSCO faculty has identified learning objectives to support each goal. Learning Goal 1 Learning Objective 1.1 Learning Objective 1.2 Learning Goal 2 Learning Objective 2.1 Learning Objective 2.2 Etc. Table 1 - Learning Objectives for AAS - LSCO Goals 1 through 6 Goal 1 - Demonstrate knowledge of logistics and supply chain operations in today’s business environment. Objective 1.1 - Describe the internal integration of an organization’s logistics activities and functions. Objective 1.2 - Describe the external integration of an organization’s supply chain. Goal 2 - Perform inventory control analyses used to improve supply chain efficiency. Objective 2.1 - Conduct an Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) analysis using case study data. Objective 2.2 - Determine lead times within an inventory control system in order to minimize stock outs. Goal 3 - Demonstrate the impact of logistics and supply chain operations on an organization’s bottom line. Objective 3.1 - Create a Profit and Loss Statement and a Balance Sheet; and document changes on both as logistics and supply chain inputs change. Objective 3.2 - Develop and analyze a DuPont Model to highlight the effects of logistics and supply chain inputs on an organization’s financial ratios. Goal 4 - Demonstrate skills in data mining in supply chain topics and sources. Objective 4.1 - Conduct a document search of supply chain management materials using: the “Logistography” link on the Logistics Department’s website; and other UAA Consortium Library resources. Objective 4.2 - Conduct information searches of supply chain topics and organizations using various online resources, including the websites of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) and the Institute for Supply Management (ISM). Goal 5 - Explain the role of transportation in Alaska’s economy. Objective 5.1 - Review and interpret available data and reports concerning transportation in Alaska. Objective 5.2 - Observe and document real-world examples of the role of transportation in Alaska. AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 5 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 6. Goal 6 - Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively. Objective 6.1 - Prepare and deliver an effective supply chain management presentation. Objective 6.2 - Write clear, concise, and correct case study analyses. AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 6 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 7. Assessment Tools Concept of the assessment tool. For the purposes of this plan, an assessment tool is a procedure, protocol, or exercise that is reasonably objective, repeatable over time, and can be used to carry out the following two-step process for each learning objective: Step 1: Determine whether each student did or did not meet the objective (a yes-no result). Step 2: Determine the percentage of sampled students who have met the objective. This concept follows AACSB guidelines and is, of course, different than simply taking the mean of a sample of scores that span a range. It de-emphasizes exceptionally high and low scores and focuses program improvement on increasing the number of students who achieve a certain competency level. Challenges in designing and using assessment tools. At least three key challenges must be addressed when crafting and using each tool. Challenge 1: Repeatability. The tool must be utilized over time and across different sections of the same course or across two or more courses. Challenge 2: Sampling. What is the sample of students? Is it representative of the population? How are students in the AAS-LSCO degree program identified (if at all) from other students taking a course? In the case of lower-level core courses, how are prospective AAS-LSCO degree program students identified and included (or not included) in the sample? Challenge 3: Criteria for determining a yes vs. no achievement. If the assessment tool produces a continuous score, this issue concerns the appropriate determination of the cut-off point or score. Some tools may include a combination of qualitative ratings. Faculty must decide how these ratings map into the yes-no result and document the method so that it can be repeated over time and by different people. Another issue, yet less critical than the three identified above, is the decision of what percentage of successful students is “acceptable” to the faculty. This determination need not be made in advance nor must it be a fixed target. Trends over time may be more important and different stakeholders may wish to judge different percentages as adequate or not. The AACSB goal of “continuous improvement” dictates that whatever the percentage of students achieving the learning objective is, we should strive to increase that percentage over time. Table 2 summarizes the primary tools to be used in evaluating the AAS - LSCO program’s learning goals. Assessment of these goals and their objectives will be completed primarily in the curriculum’s required or core courses. AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 7 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 8. Table 2 - Assessment Tools and Administration Data Description Frequency/ Tool Collection Administered by (Students will…) Start Date Method Fall and Spring Business Compose varied length papers as semesters, Evaluation by Course Instructors Presentations part of course assignments. beginning faculty Fall 2009 Fall and Spring Written Compose varied length papers as semesters, Evaluation by Course Instructors Papers part of course assignments. beginning faculty Fall 2009 Analyze aspects of a supply chain Fall and Spring Case management case; develop semesters, Evaluation by Course Instructors Analyses conclusions and/or beginning faculty recommendations Fall 2009 Fall and Spring Group Work in teams to produce a product semesters, Evaluation by Course Instructors Projects (report, presentation, etc.) beginning faculty Fall 2009 Fall and Spring Embedded Complete or perform specific semesters, Evaluation by Course-Level assignments and/or sections of Course Instructors beginning faculty Assessments course examinations Fall 2009 AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 8 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 9. Table 3 shows how each assessment tool associates with one or more learning goals. Examples of some of the tools / rubrics are included in a separate appendix along with a description of how they will be implemented and any factors that may affect results. Table 3 - Association of Assessment Tools to Learning Goals Business Written Case Group Embedded Course- Presentation Papers Analyses Projects Level Assessments s 1. Demonstrate knowledge of logistics and supply chain √ ~ √ ~ √ operations in today’s business environment. 2. Perform inventory control analyses used to improve supply ~ ~ √ √ √ chain efficiency. 3. Demonstrate the impact of logistics and supply chain √ √ √ √ √ operations on an organization’s bottom line. 4. Demonstrate skills in data mining in supply chain topics and ~ √ √ ~ √ sources. 5. Explain the role of transportation in Alaska’s economy. ~ √ √ ~ √ 6. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively. √ √ √ ~ ~ ~ = Tool is not used to measure the associated goals / objectives. √ = Tool is used to measure the associated goals / objectives. AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 9 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 10. Assessment Implementation & Analysis for Program Improvement General Implementation Strategy The CBPP Dean’s Office and college staff is responsible for: • Provide sufficient financial support for development and implementation of this plan. • Ensure that faculty assessment efforts are appropriately reflected in annual workload agreements. The AAS - LSCO faculty is responsible for: • Undertaking assessment efforts as an integral portion of teaching activity. • Participating in meetings to discuss assessment data and offer recommendations for program improvement. Assessment Timetable 1. AAS - LSCO program faculty and/or course instructors will collect raw data throughout the academic year (September-April). 2. An AAS - LSCO faculty designee shall prepare a draft Assessment Report and submit it to the UAA Office of Academic Affairs by June 15. The report shall include the analysis of data collected during the prior year by each assessment tool; the status of recommendations previously adopted; and proposed recommendations for the faculty to consider. 3. AAS - LSCO program faculty will meet every fall at the start of the semester, prior to the start of classes, to review the compiled data from the previous year and to develop recommendations for program improvements to better achieve the stated objectives and outcomes. 4. AAS - LSCO program faculty will meet every January to discuss results from the previous calendar year and plan data collection activities for the current calendar year. Proposed program changes may be any action or change in policy that the faculty deems as being necessary to improve performance relative to program objectives and outcomes. Recommended changes should also consider workload (faculty, staff, and students), budgetary, facilities, and other relevant constraints. A few examples of changes made by programs at UAA include:  Changes in course content, scheduling, sequencing, prerequisites, delivery methods, etc.  Changes in faculty/staff assignments  Changes in advising methods and requirements  Addition and/or replacement of equipment  Changes to facilities AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 10 of 11 February 14, 2009
  • 11. Modification of the Assessment Plan The faculty, after reviewing the collected data and the processes used to collect it, may decide to alter the assessment plan. Changes may be made to any component of the plan, including the goals, objectives, assessment tools, collection methods, or any other aspect of the plan. Any changes are to be approved by the faculty of the program. A modified assessment plan will be forwarded to the CBPP Dean and the UAA Office of Academic Affairs. Appendix A: Embedded Assessment Documents N.B.: Instead of including many pages of documents showing examples of data collection tools, rubrics, etc. we have embedded sample documents below. If you are viewing a printed version of this document, you will not have these documents in printed form. To view the documents, you need access to the electronic version of this file. Simply double-click on a document icon below to view it. Sample Document Description / Purpose Embedded Document Link Treasure Hunt Assignment For each Learning Objective, a student assignment or assessment has been created. Attached is the assignment for Treasure Hunt the AAS - LSCO Learning Objective 4.1. Assignment.doc For AAS - LSCO Learning Objective 4.1, a standard Treasure Hunt Evaluation grading rubric was developed for use by all instructors. All LGOP A110 student assignments were evaluated using this Treasure Hunt document and grading criteria. Assessment Results.doc AAS-LSCO Assessment Plan For each Learning Objective, a template file for collection and reporting of assessment data has been created. Attached Learning Obj is the file for the AAS - LSCO Learning Objective 4.1. 4-1Assess Results.doc More documents will be added as archived files are gathered and organized by the CBPP Assessment Committee. AAS - LSCO Assessment Plan Page 11 of 11 February 14, 2009