UNIVERSITY COLLEGE NORTHAMPTON
COMMON ACADEMIC FRAMEWORK

MODULE SPECIFICATION

The module specification represents a form...
within the organisation and the whole supply chain. It will have an applied and
realistic focus as case studies will be us...
On successful completion of the module (MODAL level) students will be able to:

Knowledge and Understanding

   a) Identif...
b) Define and contextualise the scope of e-Business and the features of its
      various manifestations, including busine...
•   Overview of logistics and transportation activities

    Inventory management and tracking techniques e.g. barcodes an...
Beers, wines and spirits
       Automobiles and road vehicles

   •   Case Studies (integrated into the context above)

  ...
The first assessment will require research into the implications for the adoption and
application of e-Business supply cha...
Waters, D.; (2003), Logistics: An Introduction to Supply Chain Management,
Palgrave Macmillan.

Journals:

International J...
•   recommend the appropriate measures for the management of transport,
        warehousing, inventory and materials handl...
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  1. 1. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE NORTHAMPTON COMMON ACADEMIC FRAMEWORK MODULE SPECIFICATION The module specification represents a formal definitive statement that is kept updated and used for the purposes of approval, delivery and reference. * indicates that the information under this heading is definitive and can only be amended through the change of approval procedure. School Northampton Business School Field Information Sciences Module Title The Virtual Supply Chain Module Code Level Credit Value Leader INS2012DL 2 20 Brendan D'Cruz Pre-requisites* None Co-requisites* None Restrictions* None Context/Rationale The Internet continues to transform how business is conducted through the various electronically-mediated activities of e-Business and e-Commerce. There are complex and interactive relationships between organisations, their customers and suppliers, and other stakeholders both inside and outside a highly integrated e-Business environment. It is clear that e-Business is deployed throughout an entire industrial sector's supply chain, linking manufacturers, assemblers, distributors, suppliers, and customers through national and international transport systems and logistics networks. The organisations with the best chance of competitive survival are those that have integrated their joint demand and supply chains to the point where information is seamlessly shared and instantly transmitted to all partners. The entire e-Business supply chain environment depends on effective communication, coordination and cooperation as facilitated through the technical infrastructure of the Internet. This module addresses the need for students to understand supply chains, logistics and e-Business in its wider context, recognising the major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks it brings to the business/commercial community. The emphasis in the module will be on understanding the integration of systems and business processes
  2. 2. within the organisation and the whole supply chain. It will have an applied and realistic focus as case studies will be used to illustrate how organisations are using the concepts of virtual supply chains, logistics and transport networks and e-Business approaches in their current and planned operations. Learning Outcomes* This module allows for further specialisation in the level three module - "The Digital Economy" - which will provide a deeper macro-level analysis of the relevant underlying political, economic and social models and issues. On successful completion of the module (THRESHOLD level) students will be able to: Knowledge and Understanding a) Identify the major elements of the supply chain and the various functional activities that take place during each stage of the logistics process. b) Define the scope of e-Business and its various manifestations, including business-to-business, business-to-consumer, and consumer-to-consumer aspects. c) Appreciate the stages in the adoption of the electronic transfer of information between trading organisations, and the business and technological factors that have influenced this progression. d) Identify from real-world examples of both large organisations and SME's the innovative ways in which e-Business and logistics technology is being applied to their operational processes in the supply chain. e) Evaluate the need to consider e-Business within the broader framework of global commerce, transport networks and inter-organisational trading. Subject-specific Skills f) Appraise the impact that e-Business concepts have on individual organisations and upon all the contributing parts of the supply chain. g) Evaluate the development of e-Business in specified organisation or industries, and assess the implications for future directions in terms of organisational structure and business functions. Key Skills h) Use the Internet to seek out real-world examples of good practice in the application of e-Business. i) Research the implementation of e-Business and supply chain concepts in context and use this to present a well-structured assessment of the case.
  3. 3. On successful completion of the module (MODAL level) students will be able to: Knowledge and Understanding a) Identify the major elements of the supply chain and the various functional activities that take place during each stage of the logistics process. b) Define and contextualise the scope of e-Business and the features of its various manifestations, including business-to-business, business-to-consumer, and consumer-to-consumer aspects. c) Appreciate the stages in the adoption of the electronic transfer of information between trading organisations, and the business and technological factors that have influenced and will continue to influence this progression. d) Identify and evaluate from real-world examples of both large organisations and SME's the innovative ways in which e-Business and logistics technology is being applied to their operational processes in the supply chain. e) Evaluate in context the need to consider e-Business within the broader framework of global commerce, transport networks and inter-organisational trading. Subject-specific Skills f) Critically appraise the impact that e-Business applications have on individual organisations and upon all the contributing parts of the supply chain. g) Evaluate the development of e-Business in specified organisation or industries, and critically assess the implications for future directions in terms of organisational structure and business functions. Key Skills h) Use the Internet to seek out real-world examples of good practice in the application of e-Business. i) Research the implementation of e-Business and supply chain concepts in context and use this to present a well-structured and articulated assessment of the case. On successful completion of the module (UPPER DECILE level) students will be able to: Knowledge and Understanding a) Identify and fully appreciate the major elements of the supply chain and the various functional activities that take place during each stage of the logistics process.
  4. 4. b) Define and contextualise the scope of e-Business and the features of its various manifestations, including business-to-business, business-to-consumer, and consumer-to-consumer aspects. c) Discuss the stages in the adoption of the electronic transfer of information between trading organisations, and the business and technological factors that have influenced and continue to influence this progression. d) Identify and critically evaluate from real-world examples of both large organisations and SME's the innovative ways in which e-Business and logistics technology is being applied to their operational processes in the supply chain. e) Evaluate in context with examples the need to consider e-Business within the broader framework of global commerce, transport networks and inter- organisational trading. Subject-specific Skills f) Critically appraise and justify the impact that e-Business applications have on individual organisations and upon all the contributing parts of the supply chain. g) Evaluate using examples the development of e-Business in specified organisation or industries, and critically assess the implications for future directions in terms of organisational structure and business functions. Key Skills h) Use the Internet to seek out real-world examples of good practice in the application of e-Business. i) Research the implementation of e-Business and supply chain concepts in context and use this to present a well-structured, coherent and justified assessment of the case. Indicative Content • Foundations of e-Business and e-Commerce in the supply chain The inter-disciplinary nature of e-Business and the enabling technologies The competitive and cooperative environment in a national and global context The creation of value networks through integration of the supply chain The key supply chain processes: - Purchasing (and procurement) and inbound logistics, buy side e-commerce and upstream supply chain - Inventory control and operations - Marketing (and service) and outbound logistics, sell side e-commerce and downstream supply chain
  5. 5. • Overview of logistics and transportation activities Inventory management and tracking techniques e.g. barcodes and RFID Transport management; options and strategies, issues affecting price, cost and service Warehousing and storage management systems: functions, conditions, placement, alternatives, global concerns and implications Materials handling and packaging: optimising use and effective product packaging • The development of virtual supply chains from traditional technologies and EDI to their current form EDI: its features and problems Internet and EDI leading to B2B and B2C networks Emerging technologies and their role in the virtual supply chain Collaboration technologies and virtual enterprises • Security and trust in the e-Business supply chain Security requirements for secure transactions Encryption and authentication Certification and digital signatures Smart cards, biometrics and electronic payments/transactions • The application of e-Business The adoption of B2c and B2B e-Commerce and selling via the Internet Disintermediation and re-intermediation Electronic distributors and electronic brokers Electronic procurement and the supply chain Knowledge and information management in the "extended enterprise" Outbound logistics, Just-In-Time delivery, tracking technologies Virtual Integration i.e. enhanced customer focus, mass customisation The "Virtual Enterprise" e.g. outsourcing of activities, collaborative networks • Purchasing, sourcing and e-procurement Location and evaluation of international sources International sourcing strategies; local buying, group sourcing agreements, strategic alliances, integrated supply chains Locating key competences, exploiting local expertise Threats and opportunities of outsourcing and multi-sourcing • The impact of e-Business in a variety of industries and sectors, such as: Home and office furniture Consumer electronics The retail and grocery sector
  6. 6. Beers, wines and spirits Automobiles and road vehicles • Case Studies (integrated into the context above) Amazon.com, e-Bay Sony, Panasonic, Curry’s, Samsung Cisco Systems, HP Compaq, Dell Corporation, IBM Ford, GM, Nissan and Covisint Federal Express, DHL Tesco, Sainsbury, Nestle, M&S, Wal- Mart Note: the case studies listed here in the Indicative Content are those that may be deemed as being representative of typical examples of their sector. However, it should be recognised that virtual supply chains are developing at such a rapid pace that more appropriate case material may be used at the actual time of delivery to illustrate the latest developments in this subject. Teaching and Learning Strategy This module provides the students with the theoretical foundations necessary for an understanding of E-Business and the virtual supply chain, as well as demonstrating the capabilities and innovative ways in which this is applied in real-world organisations. Throughout this module, extensive use will be made of case studies and the students will be encouraged to seek out and research other case studies for themselves. Dedicated online resources and electronically mediated communication will be used wherever possible. Workshops will involve lectures, seminars, guest speakers and demonstrations. E-learning tutorials will consist of interactive electronic content and activities using NILE (running on Blackboard) that may involve virtual activities and some formative assessments. These tasks will typically require 18 hours of learning time not including any independent study time. Teaching , Learning + Assessment Activities Study Hours 6 x 3 hour e-learning tutorials 18 3 x 6 hour workshops 18 1 x individual research assignment (report) 30 1 x individual research and online presentation 20 1 x individual research assignment (report) 30 Independent study 84 TOTAL 200 Assessment Strategy Consistent with the teaching and learning strategy outlined above, this module is assessed wholly through research-based coursework of which there will be three assessments - two individual reports and an online presentation.
  7. 7. The first assessment will require research into the implications for the adoption and application of e-Business supply chains including logistics, transport and warehouse management strategies in a selected country. The assessment vehicle will be a formal individual report of typically 2000-3000 words. The second assessment will be an individual online presentation that will require research into a specific industry or sector and identify all the different trading relationships within the whole supply chain, and review the adoption of e-Business supply chain and logistics activities to identify future developments. The third assessment will concentrate on a given industry or sector, and evaluate the virtual supply chain activities of individual companies within these areas. The assessment vehicle will be a formal individual report of typically 2000 - 3000 words. Assessment Items Units Weightings Learning Outcomes Individual report 2 30% a), e), h) Online presentation 1 20% b), c), d), g), h) Individual report 2 50% b), c), d), f), h), i) Assessment Criteria Assessment criteria will be specified for each item of assessment. The criteria will map to the standard assessment grade criteria of the Common Academic Framework. Indicative Reading and other Learning Resources Books: Awad, E.M.; (2004), Electronic Commerce: From Vision to Fulfillment, 2nd Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall. Chaffey, D.; (2004), E-Business and E-Commerce Management, 2nd Edition, FT Prentice Hall. Christopher, M.; (2004), Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Creating Value- Adding Networks, FT Prentice Hall. Gattorna, J.; (2003), Gower Handbook of Supply Chain Management, 5th Edition, Gower. Gourdin, K.N.; (2001), Global Logistics Management, Blackwell. Harrison, A.; Van Hoek, R.; (2002), Logistics Management & Strategy, FT Prentice Hall. Laudon, K.C.; Traver, C.G.; (2004), E-Commerce: Business, Technology, Society, 2nd Edition, Addison Wesley. Rushton, A.; Oxley, J.; (eds), (2000), Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management, Kogan Page.
  8. 8. Waters, D.; (2003), Logistics: An Introduction to Supply Chain Management, Palgrave Macmillan. Journals: International Journal of Electronic Commerce Journal of Business Logistics Journal of Enterprise Information Management Logistics Information Management Logistics Management International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management Web Resources: Achieving supply chain excellence through technology: www.ascet.com Business & E-Commerce: www.se-com.com Dell Computer Corporation: www.dell.com Federal Express: www.fedex.com/virtualorder/ Institute of Export: www.export.org.uk/ Logistics Management: http://www.manufacturing.net/lm/ Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport: www.iolt.org.uk Supply Chain Brain: http://www.supplychainbrain.com/ IBM and the Supply Chain: www.ibm.com/e-business/supplychain E Centre UK: www.e-centre.org.uk EU e-commerce: www.ispo.cec.be/Ecommerce Benchmarking This module has been benchmarked against the Computing (2000) subject benchmark statement: e-Commerce Nature of e-Commerce. Particular problems. Major components in such a system. Hard and soft e-Commerce. Business-to-business and business-to-consumer technologies. Digital signatures and authentication issues. Logistics and Exporting This module has been mapped to specific learning outcomes from the Institute of Exporting module “International Logistics and Purchasing”: • define the role and importance of logistics in an international context • use that ability within a corporate structure to maximise the effectiveness of an organisation’s marketing and distribution strategy
  9. 9. • recommend the appropriate measures for the management of transport, warehousing, inventory and materials handling • evaluate the various global sources of products and materials Employability This module has been benchmarked against SFIA (Skills Framework for the Information Age) at Level 4 – “Enable” Autonomy Works under general direction within a clear framework of accountability Substantial personal responsibility and autonomy Plans own work to meet given objectives and processes Influence Influence team and specialist peers internally Influences customers at account level and suppliers Some responsibility for work of others and allocation of resources Participates in external activities related to specialisation Decisions influence success of projects and team objectives Complexity Broad range of complex technical or professional work activities, in a variety of contexts Business Skills Selects appropriately from applicable standards, methods, tools and applications and use Demonstrates analytical and systematic approach to problem solving Communicates fluently orally and in writing and can present complex technical information to both technical and non-technical audiences Is able to plan, schedule and monitor work activities in order to meet time and quality targets and in accordance with health and safety procedures Is able to absorb rapidly new technical information and apply it effectively Good appreciation of wider field of information systems, how this can be used in relevant employment areas and how information systems relate to the business activities of the employer or client Maintains awareness of developing technologies and their application and takes some responsibility for personal development The categories, subcategories and skills areas that this module addresses are: Strategy and planning: advice and guidance – technical specialism, consultancy; technical strategy and planning - emerging technology monitoring, methods and tools, network planning Management and administration: supply management – contract management, procurement; resource management – IS co-ordination Service delivery: infrastructure – security administration Approval and review dates Date of first approval: September 2000 Date of revision: Jan 2005 Nature of Revision: Update, Indicative Reading

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