Fall, 2007
                                    College of Business
 Departments of Accounting, Finance and Operations and ...
COB Assessment, p. 2 of 22


        •   Teaching is our priority. We foster a learning environment where students and
   ...
COB Assessment, p. 3 of 22


The College’s mission statement and set of strategic objectives and tactics identified in its...
COB Assessment, p. 4 of 22


   Services. During the last 5 quarters since Fall, 2006, the average number of CB students
 ...
COB Assessment, p. 5 of 22


the Sedona database system was bought. In 2001 and reaffirmed in 2005, CB adopted
college-wid...
COB Assessment, p. 6 of 22


     2007 in the Department of Accounting alone exceeded $5000 so substantial resources are
 ...
COB Assessment, p. 7 of 22


                    Mission Element: “Teaching Excellence is Our Priority”
             Missi...
COB Assessment, p. 8 of 22


2004 NWCCU update. It was a syllabi audit focused on such “key perspectives” as ethics,
globa...
COB Assessment, p. 9 of 22


                Mission-Linked Activities                   Assessment Indicators & Activitie...
COB Assessment, p. 10 of 22


     •    comprehend issues in ethical decision making and social responsibility
     •    u...
COB Assessment, p. 11 of 22


    •   recruit and admit students into the MPA Program who are capable of developing the en...
COB Assessment, p. 12 of 22


                             TOTAL Economics Preadmission Credits (minimum)                 ...
COB Assessment, p. 13 of 22


                                       Issues        Issues      Issues     Issues     Issue...
COB Assessment, p. 14 of 22


ACCT 302
BUS 221          +                                                                 ...
COB Assessment, p. 15 of 22


ETS Major Field Exam Results
   Quarter         Location           # Students        CWU Mea...
COB Assessment, p. 16 of 22


a precipitous drop in accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and international; however ...
COB Assessment, p. 17 of 22


Winter 2004               138           45.7         43.2             55%
Spring 2004       ...
COB Assessment, p. 18 of 22


Spring 2007          200           52.0          NA               NA
Summer 2007          11...
COB Assessment, p. 19 of 22


          Fall 2002                    85              55.7           57.6             48%
 ...
COB Assessment, p. 20 of 22




Results of Survey of College of Business 1997 and 2001 Graduates (conducted 2003)

       ...
COB Assessment, p. 21 of 22


Retention Practices in the COB

The COB utilizes a number of practices to recruit and retain...
COB Assessment, p. 22 of 22


           BS in Economics, and a certificate in Supply Chain Management. Lacey graduated in...
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  1. 1. Fall, 2007 College of Business Departments of Accounting, Finance and Operations and Supply Chain Management, Business Administration, Management, and Economics Prepared for 2009 NWCCU Program Assessment Review building upon information provided for last update of July, 2004 College Level Goals and Objectives, Accomplishments, and Reflections The College of Business (COB) is currently comprised of three four departments having in 2006 split the Department of Business Administration into the Department of Management and the Department of Finance and Operations and Supply Chain Management. Thus, currently, CB is comprised of Accounting, Management and the Department of Finance and Operations and Supply Chain Management, and Economics. The College offers the following degrees and certificates: Bachelors of Science in Accounting, Business Administration (with various concentrations), Economics (with various specializations), a certificate in Supply Chain Management, and a Masters of Professional Accountancy. The Departments are somewhat interrelated and share a common vision, mission, and set of values (see most recent statement, April, 2005, in Appendix). The Vision Statement of the COB is concise and focuses on student outcomes emerging from a scholarly community that values teaching and research. We aspire to be a distinctive scholarly community from which students reach their full potential. CWU’s College of Business will be recognized as a premier learning community creating an environment in which students, faculty and staff reach their full potential. The COB Mission Statement, last revised in 2000 2005, describes who we are and our purpose. COB assessment activities are closely linked to the mission, ; thus a brief discussion of the mission follows. The College of Business creates value and opportunity for our students by providing a high quality education at the Ellensburg campus and university centers in the Puget Sound and central regions of Washington state. CWU’s College of Business faculty and staff create value and opportunity for our students by focusing on quality in undergraduate education at the Ellensburg campus and university centers in the Puget Sound and central regions of Washington state. We accomplish this through emphasis on excellence in teaching, strengthened by faculty research and supported by professional service. Key phrases, “value and opportunity” and “high quality education,” are expanded in the mission statement in order to provide a better-defined foundation from which to develop strategic objectives and tactics,” Key are the phrases, value, opportunity, and quality in education which drive the discussion in the following sections. Value and Opportunity • Through curricula based on theory and on practice, we prepare an increasingly diverse student population with the knowledge, competencies and skills that are necessary for productive careers. • Our undergraduate and graduate degree programs are offered with the highest emphasis on excellence in teaching, which is strengthened by faculty research and supported by professional service. • With emphasis on undergraduate education, degree programs are delivered by faculty who are dedicated to using their academic preparation and business experience to enhance student learning. High Quality Education
  2. 2. COB Assessment, p. 2 of 22 • Teaching is our priority. We foster a learning environment where students and faculty work actively together. • Curricula reflect current needs and developments in business and promote an understanding of theory and its practical application. • Education at a high level of quality derives from concern for students at the individual level, and personalized, innovative instruction supported by appropriate learning technologies. • Important linkages are developed with alumni, College of Business Advisory Board, employers and other professionals in business and education. • We are committed to outcomes assessment and continuous improvement in order to provide a high quality education. MEANING OF OUR MISSION Value • We are affordable and accessible to an increasingly diverse student population. • Through curricula based on theory and on practice, we prepare students with the knowledge, competencies and skills that are necessary for productive careers in a dynamic and changing environment. • Undergraduate and niche graduate degree programs are delivered by faculty who are dedicated to using their academic preparation and business experience to enhance student learning and career preparation. (WHAT IS THE OPERATIONAL DEFINITION/MEASUREMENT HERE?) Opportunity • We are a university of choice to students and an employer of choice to faculty and staff. (NEED SOME DATA FOR THIS ONE) • We transform lives through a learning environment built on a foundation of teaching excellence, effective curricula and state-of-the-art physical facilities. (NEED SOME DATA) • We serve students in State of Washington through programs and courses delivered at well-established University Centers co-located on dynamic community college campuses. Quality in Education • Teaching is our priority. We foster a learning environment characterized by an accessible faculty and a high degree of faculty and student interaction. • Curricula reflect current needs and developments in business and promote an understanding of theory and its practical application. • Education at a high level of quality derives from concern for students at the individual level, and personalized, innovative instruction supported by appropriate learning technologies. (ARE WE THINKING SMALL CLASSROOMS…DATA ON INNOVATIVE INSTRUCTION AND APPROPRIATE LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES) • Important linkages are developed with alumni, College of Business Advisory Board, employers and other professionals in business and education. (NEED SOME DATA) • We are committed to outcomes assessment and continuous improvement in order to provide a high quality education. Assessing COB Progress towards Meeting its Mission
  3. 3. COB Assessment, p. 3 of 22 The College’s mission statement and set of strategic objectives and tactics identified in its Strategic Plan: “Shaping the Future” (Winter 2002) as well as updated statements (see April, 8, 2005 in Appendix) form the basis for the majority of activities pursued by the College. The following tables illustrate the linkages among key elements of the mission, selected mission-aligned activities, and COB assessment indicators and activities. VALUE Mission Element: “Prepare an Increasingly Diverse Student Population” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - COB-sponsored Leadership and Diversity - Monitor diversity data for the region, Lecture Series university, and college - Increase support for diversity-related - Periodic review of support for student student organizations organizations support and minority - Increase minority scholarships scholarships Results to Date As can be seen in the appendix, the percentage of minority students in the CB has increased from 18.8% in 2001 to 27.2% in 2007. The percentage of foreign students fluctuates and currently is around 5% of the CB student population. The minority and foreign student population exceeds by a considerable margin the same statistics for CWU at large. In support of CWU at large, departments like the Department of Economics, have had several faculty appointed as faculty mentors to help minority students succeed at CWU, regardless of major. Leadership & Diversity Lecture Series: Though this specific series has not occurred since 20??, a diverse array of speakers have been featured at CB events including African-American Earl W. Overstreet who was the featured speaker in 2007 at a B-2-B Breakfast and at the CB Honors Banquet. In 2005, African American Ken Denman was selected for the Alumni Profile on the cover page of The Beacon, the CB glossy, as well as a B-2-B Breakfast speaker. The diversity issue is something CB takes seriously. Currently, the Students and Programs subcommittee of the Dean’s Advisory Board is specifically tasked with increasing diversity among students and alumni. A visual inspection of The Beacon pictorials from 2001 to present shows a white-male dominated College that is increasingly diverse in gender, race, and national origin among its faculty, students, alumni, speakers and associates. Support to student organizations. In 2003, an Hispanic business club, ECO or Exito, Conocimiento, Oportunidad (which translated means Success, Knowledge, and Opportunity) was started. The club mission has drifted to become an international business club. There is discussion however of doing more to specifically attract and retain Hispanics at CWU and in the CB. Scholarships. Prior to 2001, a focused effort was made to raise more funding for scholarships. By 2001, businesses donated to a pool of scholarship money. By 2002, scholarship money became “named” in their association with particular companies. In 2003, Boeing which already had the previous year given a Boeing “general” scholarship and a Boeing Supply Chain Scholarship, introduced a Boeing Minority Scholarship. In 2005, Costco became a scholarship contributor including the Costco Minority Scholarship. CB scholarship monies for all students are increasing substantially over time. For instance, in 2005, $19,600 in CB scholarships were awarded. In 2006, CB awarded $40,850 in scholarships; in 2007, the amount was $58,500. Mission Element: “Knowledge, Competencies, and Skills for Productive Careers” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - Encourage student interest in internships; - Internship and placement data cultivate placement opportunities - Periodic curriculum review - Infusion of multicultural/global perspective - Results of ETS field exam in business in the curriculum - Review of graduate satisfaction surveys Results to Date CWU internships are highly organized experiences run in cooperation with Career
  4. 4. COB Assessment, p. 4 of 22 Services. During the last 5 quarters since Fall, 2006, the average number of CB students taking part in internships per quarter is 26.2. Career Services also attempts a post-graduate survey of CWU but the response rate from CB students is less than 5%. Placement data as defined by cultivating placement opportunities for internship and/or collecting end of college job placement is most diligently practiced by the Accounting Department who work to maintain networks through such events as annual recruiting events in Seattle and Yakima each fall quarter and visiting with recruiters from public accounting firms during their campus interview visits. Accounting also tracks placements (i.e., http://www.rrtidd.com/AcctGrads.htm). For instance, the Fall, 2007 data collection showed that 16 Accounting students who responded were graduating either Fall 2007 or Winter/Spring 2008 already had placements. CPA pass rates for all of the exam and/or some portion of the exam have dropped substantially between 1993 and 2005. The Department of Accounting during the Fall, 2007 spent considerable time re-examining their curriculum at the graduate and undergraduate degree level. The most dramatic program change occurs at the graduate level which succinctly summarized has the MPA curriculum paralleling the sections of the CPA exam. Thus, it is expected that success with the CPA exam will increase. INFUSION OF MULTI-CULTI/GLOBAL??? The ETS exit exams, discussed in more detail later, are being used to inform the curriculum. The Department of Management focusing on the scores in the marketing and management portions of the ETS exam has decided to deny CB pre-majors access to these courses until fully admitted to the College of Business as majors and to create alternative principles of marketing and management courses for those majors from outside of the College starting Fall, 2008. INFUSION OF MULTI-CULTI/GLOBAL??? The Department of Economics in response to externally provided program reviews has added a new concentration, Economics and Business Forecasting. In response to the current climate of assessment, the Department specifically added a new course required of all Economics majors designed to provide the vehicle for administering assessments and also functioning as an exit course prepping students for the job market and graduate school. The department has switched from an internally developed exam to the nationally-normed ETS exam. The department is also particularly interested in internationalizing the economics curriculum. INFUSION OF MULTI-CULTI??? Currently rather than create a CB-specific satisfaction survey, CB has chosen to extract relevant portions of the Senior Survey administered by CWU and completed by CB graduates. The questions most relevant to this section include such items as computer and technology skills, management and organization skills, writing, speaking, critically analyzing, using knowledge…from your major field, providing good academic preparation in major field, etc. The data as shown in Appendix shows…. Mission Element: “Delivered by Faculty who are Dedicated to Using their Academic Preparation and Business Experience” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - Strong programs for faculty evaluation and - Detailed databases maintained and faculty planning reviewed for all faculty in the areas of - Support for faculty professional teaching, research and service development - Annual review of Faculty Activities Reports - Improve research productivity for the past year and Faculty Plans for the - Encourage faculty participation in coming year for all full-time faculty professional associations - COB-wide research standards implemented - Develop and expand research grants and monitored awards program (RGAP) Results to Date Since 200? and the implementation of the new Union with the College Bargaining Agreement, workloads and activity reports are maintained on a database in the Office of Vice President of Faculty Relations as well as electronically and hard copy in the Office of Dean. However, in order to maintain records following an AACSB format, in Fall, 2007, participation in
  5. 5. COB Assessment, p. 5 of 22 the Sedona database system was bought. In 2001 and reaffirmed in 2005, CB adopted college-wide formal research standards for faculty to be classified as what AACSB would term academically qualified (AQ). AQ and the accompanying Professional Qualified (PQ) designation for practitioner faculty are AACSB terms certifying faculty currency by virtue of either their publication record or their professional qualification. Reviews for this past year in conjunction with new hires beginning in 2007, indicate in general that ???% of full-time tenure and tenure track faculty are either academically qualified (AQ) or professionally qualified (PQ) which in comparison with 200? shows a significant improvement in the caliber of faculty being deployed in the college. The Research Grants Awards Program, instituted deliberately to foster research productivity by rewarding faculty, have expanded considerably. In 200?-200?, ? awards of $2000 were given out; in contrast in 200?-200?, the number of awards was ????. These awards are supported by Boeing and ???? (name the companies or put Advisory Board???) Faculty development opportunities are taken quite seriously at CWU and inside CB. CWU awards each faculty $700.00 to spend as appropriate to maintaining their professional currency. Each year the Provost Office has a professional development day for all faculty which Fall, 2007 covered topics relevant to assessment and continuous improvement. Each year, the Provost hosts a workshop for new tenure-track faculty. This year the topic reviewed the book, Scholarship Assessed. Within the CB, though the rules may vary between departments as to how monies are dispersed, each department expends money to support faculty currency, development, and participation in professional associations. In 05-06 and 06-07, Accounting spent $14,580 and $19,809 respectively. In 05-06 and 06-07, Economics spent $11,839.50 and $9580.64 respectively. In 05-06, the Department of Business Administration spent $44,350.00. In 06-07, that department split into the Department of Management which spent $21,744.00 and the Department of Finance and Operations Supply Chain Management for whom figures are not available. Each year, CB recognizes within the College those faculty who have excelled in Teaching, Service, and Research. However, our faculty are also recognized outside the confines of the college. In 2007 CWU recognized Economics professor Peter Saunders as the 2007 Distinguished Professor of Research. Chad Wassell, Assistant Professor of Economics, was chosen by the CWU Alumni Association for the 2007 College of Business “Excellence in Teaching” Award. In ???, Economics Professor Koushik Ghosh, was selected as a Fulbright Scholar to ???. Dr. Robert Carbaugh, is the author of two economics textbooks which are sold globally, locally,…? Other brag points about faculty????? Moss Adams Accounting (official name???) has given the Department of Accounting an endowment to support Accounting Faculty Development. Mission Element: “Enhance Student Learning” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - Leverage faculty expertise across sites - Interviews with faculty involved with the through the use of distance learning distance learning program technologies - Accounting students participation in VITA - Create additional “out-of-classroom” - Industry guest speakers in the classroom learning opportunities for students (FOR WHAT?)(DO WE HAVE DATA?) - Integrate use of case studies in capstone - Faculty Activities Reports (FOR WHAT?) courses - Curriculum review by capstone course faculty (???) - Student satisfaction surveys (measuring what????) Results to Date Since ???, approximately in any given quarter, ??% of CB courses are delivered utilizing a DE (Distance Education) mode. DE is a face-to-face experience for students at the faculty’s home base but is broadcast distance via television to students at other center locations simultaneously. However faculty are expected to physically visit the other locations and thus for a certain portion of the time the home site students receive lectures via television. In addition to the supplemental income paid to faculty, faculty travel reimbursements for Fall,
  6. 6. COB Assessment, p. 6 of 22 2007 in the Department of Accounting alone exceeded $5000 so substantial resources are devoted to this endeavor. Though effective for leveraging, it is (ANECDOTALLY?) known that faculty who teach this way sacrifice their Student Evaluation scores since the home site students (typically the traditional students at the Ellensburg campus) dislike the distance experience. (DOES ANYONE HAVE REAL DATA TO SUPPORT THIS???). In addition to the previously discussed internship data, the most systematic “Out-of- classroom” is the accounting course, ACCT 492: VITA, Volunteers Income Tax Assistance. Enrollments for the last 3 years averaged 15 students partaking in this opportunity. In 2007, this group filed 340 returns. At one point (???year), the faculty teaching capstone courses in the Department of Management decided to utilize case studies across all sections. A syllabus audit of 2006-2007 syllabi indicated this was true for all HRM 486 (Problems in Human Resource Management), for the vast majority of faculty teaching MGMT 489 (Strategic Management) with the exception of one faculty member who uses “live” cases instead of published cases. This was not true for Marketing 470 courses where cases were not used but simulations were. Currently faculty teaching MGMT 489, the capstone for alls BSBA majors in Accounting and Business Administration are discussing the use of the same simulation across all sections offered. In general there has been discussion across the college to enhance learning, particularly for those courses taught across many sections and in many cases, multiple sites. Economics 201 and 202, no matter the section or instructor, have common objectives. Accounting faculty adopted common objectives for core courses across the sites. Marketing 360 (Principles of Marketing) sections have common objectives. Management 380 (Principles of Management) utilize common objectives in general except for 2 faculty teaching the course. There has to date been little recognition of the need to measure the outcome of stated objectives. Student satisfaction surveys indicate???? OPPORTUNITY The topics of teaching excellence and effective curricula are discussed in the next section, quality in education. Here addressed are the remaining elements of opportunity. Mission Element: University of Choice for Students/State of the Art Facilities Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - University of Choice for students???? - ??? - Employer of Choice for Faculty - Number of employment offers accepted - Serving students through CWU Centers - Numbers of students at Centers - State-of-the Art Facilities - ???? Results to Date UNIVERSITY OF CHOICE FOR STUDENTS??? Until 200?, the university had a salary cap of $85,000 which was a deterrent to attracting faculty who could thrive under conditions of a heavy teaching load in both number of courses taught and student enrollments as well as maintain an active publishing career and engage in meaningful service like advising, etc. In 200?, with the advent of the union and the Collective Bargaining Agreement, salary caps were removed. In addition the Provost has responded to increased salary pressures as CB seeks AACSB accreditation status. As an example of effectiveness, in 200?, # offers were extended and only ?? faculty were hired. In contrast, with increased salary offers in ???, # offers were extended and ??? faculty were hired. With regard to serving students through CWU Centers, in 2006-2007, 42% of the CB FTE’s were generated at the Centers and 58% of the CB FTEs were generated at the Ellensburg campus. This contrasts sharply with the University as a whole because the Ellensburg campus generates 86% of the FTE credits in contrast to only 14% at the Centers. STATE OF THE ART FACILITIES???? QUALITY IN EDUCATION
  7. 7. COB Assessment, p. 7 of 22 Mission Element: “Teaching Excellence is Our Priority” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - COB faculty recognition program - Track record of university & CASE awards to COB faculty Processes for identifying teaching issues and a process for improving a faculty member’s - Strong programs for faculty evaluation and teaching prowess if it is evaluated as sub- faculty planning standard. - Support for faculty professional - Detailed databases maintained and development reviewed for all faculty in the areas of - Improve research productivity teaching, research and service - Encourage faculty participation in - Annual review of Faculty Activities Reports professional associations for the past year and Faculty Plans for the - Develop and expand research grants coming year for all full-time faculty awards program (RGAP) - COB-wide research standards implemented and monitored Results to Date Mission Element: “Learning Environment Where Students and Faculty Work Together” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - Create and maintain student-centered - Student input to COB teaching and advising learning environment awards - Greater involvement of students in COB - Regular meetings with COB Dean's Council governance of club presidents/leaders - Greater faculty involvement in all COB- - Student participation in COB faculty related club activities (Need some data???) searches - Student satisfaction surveys (???measuring what?) Results to Date Since 200?, it has been standard practice to have one student on the ??? teaching award committee. Advising awards have been discontinued. Since ???, the Dean meets 6 (?) times an academic year with the officers of the ?#? of Clubs and Honor Societies in the School. Discussion centers around club activities, blah, blah. Since ???, it has been standard practice to have 1 student on faculty searches. Student satisfaction surveys indicate???? Mission Element: “Effective Curricula Reflects Current Needs/Developments” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - Integrate contemporary trends in business - Curricular review involving COB Advisory into the curriculum Board with focus on what businesses are - Ensure key perspectives (ethics, global, looking for in the people they hire (??? political, social, legal & regulatory, ANYBODY GOT SOMETHING???) environmental, technology, and diversity) - Regular curriculum review by COB included in the core curriculum Curriculum Committee (YES??) - Promote well-rounded business school - Program review involving outside graduates consultants - Encourage team-based work projects - Monitor requirement that at least 50 percent - Emphasize important skills across of coursework in “non-business” curriculum - Review of syllabi by departments and COB - Foster outcomes assessment and committees continuous improvement - ETS Field Exam for end-of-major assessment of learning Results to Date The last (?) regular curriculum review by CB curriculum committee occurred in time for the
  8. 8. COB Assessment, p. 8 of 22 2004 NWCCU update. It was a syllabi audit focused on such “key perspectives” as ethics, global, political, social, legal, environmental, and diversity (See appendix). THE DECISIONS OF THE FACULTY BASED ON THIS AUDIT WAS??? The College, in part or as a whole, have been reviewed by externals since 2003. In a pilot of NWCCU accreditation program review, the Department of Accounting was externally reviewed in 2003. The recommendations specific to outcomes assessment include “a more systematic and formal assessment of graduates within the context of programmatic goals and student learning objectives.” Additionally, “current undergraduate curricular offerings need to be analyzed for inclusion of additional topics. (JIM, did you do anything about this?)” “The role of the graduate program within the mission of the department and the university should be explored.” Further, the inefficiencies of the curriculum were noted as a deterrent to faculty remaining current with their scholarship. During Fall, 2007 the Department of Accounting changed the MPA curriculum to remove 6 courses and add 4, one of which is cross-listed with an undergraduate course. Key student learning goals for both the undergraduate and graduate programs were developed and a process to assess these learning goals was designed. The Department of Economics was reviewed in 2004 and specific to outcomes assessment, there were issues of curriculum in that “…many of the economics courses listed in the catalog have not been taught recently.” (BOB, did you do anything about this?). There were issues of information literacy proficiency (BOB, did you do anything about this?) as well as questions about a continuous data collection to collect data showing that students meet program goals. The report noted that “In October 2005, it is expected that the department will have had the time to develop strong end-of program assessments that meet the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities accreditation standards.” This is a salient issue since in a 2006 report by externals specifically in regard to AACSB accreditation, there were issues that the required courses in the BS in Economics looked more like an “arts and sciences” economics program than a business one. As mentioned earlier, the Department specifically added a new course required of all Economics majors designed to provide the vehicle for administering assessments. The department has switched from an internally developed exam to the nationally-normed ETS exam. Further, the Department of Economics added a new concentration, Economics and Business Forecasting. The Department of Management is currently undergoing program review to be concluded in 2008. The Department of Finance and Operations and Supply Chain Management is scheduled to be reviewed in 2010-2011. The requirement that at least 50% of the curriculum be outside of the CB was based on an AACSB requirement which is no longer in effect and needs to be examined for deletion. A cursory review of syllabi in the last few years by the new Associate Dean revealed the following observations: overall very nicely done; many do not mention course prerequisites (only 300-400 level courses were examined). None are tied to the goals of the degrees/programs they are housed in. During a college-wide meeting in Fall, 2007 faculty had a first hearing on updating syllabi requirements (last updated 2001) which would address these deficiencies. 2007 is the year that AACSB has mandated the outcomes assessments be used to “inform the curriculum” so this year faculty used outcomes measures like the ETS to make changes in the curriculum. The ETS is addressed in more detail in later sections. In 2008, a survey of CB Advisory Board members will occur focusing on what businesses are looking for in the people they hire. Mission Element: “Students at the Individual Level, Innovative Instruction, Appropriate Technology” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - ???? - ???? Results to Date ??? Mission Element: “Linkages with Alumni, CB Advisory Board, Employers & Professionals”
  9. 9. COB Assessment, p. 9 of 22 Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - ???? - ??? Results to Date ???? Mission Element: “Outcomes Assessment and Continuous Improvement” Mission-Linked Activities Assessment Indicators & Activities - - Results to Date It should be obvious that CB is committed to improving continuously. The fact that we seek AACSB-accreditation indicates a commitment to undertaking continuous improvements FOREVER. To date, CB has been successful in??? but rather remiss in ???. This year… COB Undergraduate Programs Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment BS Accounting Program Outcomes. The broadly stated outcomes, effective beginning Fall, 2008, for this program are: • prepare students for careers in public accounting (as CPAs), industrial accounting, and nonprofit accounting. • impart to students the “common body of knowledge” required of practicing accountants • maintain a flexible program to meet the needs of a changing society. • help students learn foundation knowledge and skills in accounting and business that will aid them in private, government, or non-profit careers or prepare them for additional education for public accounting careers; and • recruit and admit students into the Bachelor of Science in Accounting Program who are capable of learning the foundation knowledge and skills in accounting and business. The student-centered accounting faculty achieve these outcomes by developing individual programs, advising students how to meet personal goals and helping the students to secure employment upon graduation. BS Business Administration Program Outcomes. For all BS in Business Administration (BSBA) graduates, the department two departments responsible for this degree, the Department of Management and the Department of Finance and Operations Supply Chain Management, have identified overall educational outcomes related to knowledge, values and skills. There are three outcome categories that students should be able to demonstrate proficiency upon completion of BSBA program. Knowledge-based Educational Outcomes—BSBA students should: • have a working knowledge in a set of analytical business tools • apply business core concepts, principles and analytical skills across functional lines • show competency in an area of specialization • understand global, national, and regional business systems and environments. Value-based Educational Outcomes—BSBA students should:
  10. 10. COB Assessment, p. 10 of 22 • comprehend issues in ethical decision making and social responsibility • understand diversity issues in the workplace and society Skills-based Educational Outcomes—BSBA students should: • function effectively when in teams both as a leader and as a member • demonstrate effective oral and written business communication skills • use business computer application software and support decisions on problems in areas in specialization • access, develop and use information to analyze business problems and propose feasible solutions. BS Economics Program Outcomes. The Economics faculty have determined the following objectives which apply to all Bachelor of Science Economics graduates (as listed in the 2003-2004 2007-2008 college catalog, page 79): • students completing an economics degree will possess the tools which enable them to analyze and understand macro and micro economic problems and policies • students will possess qualifications and knowledge which will help them to find employment in fields related to economics • students will acquire and be able to use basic tools to enable them to carry out quantitatively oriented tasks in their employment or their field of graduate studies • students completing the program should possess the communication and economic skills desirable in their future employment or graduate studies. For the BS in Economics, learning economics will help students think logically and improve their ability to use economic concepts to analyze “real world” problems and opportunities. Positions of responsibility in today’s world are usually held by individuals who have the capacity to analyze complex problems and make intelligent decisions. In addition to preparation for business and government agency employment, the BS in Economics is excellent preparation for law schools, MBA programs and graduate programs in economics, agricultural economics and natural resource management. Graduate Program: Master of Professional Accountancy (MPA) The MPA prepares students for careers as accounting professionals. The program is designed to help them develop essential skills in critical thinking, oral and written communications, teamwork, advanced accounting issues, and the use if information technologies to perform research and solve problems. As graduates of the program, they will be able to identify and resolve accounting and business issues while serving as the trusted business advisers for their clients and employers. The MPA degree satisfies the fifth year education requirement adopted by the state of Washington (and the vast majority of other states) for licensure as a CPA and by the AICPA as a requirement for membership. The MPA curriculum is designed to provide students with a broad education in accounting and its application in economic decision making. While it is continuously adapting and evolving to meet demands of the accounting profession and the needs of its students, the curriculum’s current foundation courses are focused on: • strategic management and leadership • tax research, planning and compliance • information technologies design, security and audit • financial accounting analysis and emerging issues. Effective Fall, 2008, the goals for the Master of Professional Accountancy degrees are as follows: • help students enter the public accounting profession by developing the entry-level knowledge and skills expected by the profession in the areas of auditing and attestation, financial accounting and reporting, regulation, business environment and concepts, and writing; and
  11. 11. COB Assessment, p. 11 of 22 • recruit and admit students into the MPA Program who are capable of developing the entry-level knowledge and skills expected by the public accounting profession. Program Level Assessment Specific College of Business Prerequisites and Preadmission Requirements. In addition to the university-wide course requirements, prior to admission to the COB, applicants for all three undergraduate COB major programs must have: • achieved a minimum overall GPA of 2.00 in all collegiate studies, and • completed English 101 and 102 (or transfer equivalent). Further, admission to the Accounting or Business Administration major requires the completion of seven pre-admission courses with a minimum GPA of 2.25 for Accounting and a minimum GPA of 2.50 for the Business Administration major and a minimum grade of “C-“ (1.70) in each course. The Business Administration requirement of 2.50 is new, effective ???, due to the faculty review indicating that Business Administration students were not as strong as they needed to be. Admission to the Economics major requires the completion of four pre-admission courses with a minimum GPA of 2.25 and a minimum grade of “C-“ (1.70) in each course. The credit/no credit option is not accepted for any pre-admission courses. Effective Fall, 2008, the Accounting Department has raised its admission GPA to 2.5 since business administration students were falsely declaring accounting as their major in order to pursue the business administration major while retaking courses in the pre-requirements to bring up their GPA and then re- applying to the business administration major, often simultaneously applying for graduation. Beginning Fall, 2007 faculty have also been advised and strongly cautioned against the extremely problematic overuse of “permission of the instructor.” For Winter, 2008 registration, students had to submit since many students have been “permissioning” their way through the degree and applying for graduation from a CB major simultaneously admitted to the College. The following tables outline the preadmission coursework required prior to formal admission into one the COB undergraduate major programs. BS Accounting and BS Business Administration Preadmission Requirements COURSE # COURSE NAME CREDITS ACCT 251 Accounting I 5 ACCT 252 Accounting II 5 BUS 221 Intro. Business Statistics (Prerequisite, IT 101 and MATH 130.1) 5 BUS 241 Legal Environment of Business 5 ECON 201 Principles of Economics Micro 5 ECON 202 Principles of Economics Macro 5 MATH 163.1 153 or Pre-Calculus Mathematics I, or MATH 170 or Intuitive Calculus, or 5 MATH 172.1 Calculus TOTAL Accounting and Bus. Admin. Preadmission Credits (minimum) 35 BS Economics Preadmission Requirements COURSE # COURSE NAME CREDITS BUS 221 Intro. Business Statistics (Prerequisite, IT 101 and MATH 130.1) 5 ECON 201 Principles of Economics Micro 5 ECON 202 Principles of Economics Macro 5 MATH 163.1 or Pre-Calculus Mathematics I, or MATH 170 or Intuitive Calculus, or 5 MATH 172.1 Calculus
  12. 12. COB Assessment, p. 12 of 22 TOTAL Economics Preadmission Credits (minimum) 20 Once the above preadmission courses are completed, students may petition for acceptance into a major. Students who have not completed their preadmission courses are blocked from registering for some of the required 300-level major courses; they may enroll in the blocked major courses only if they are concurrently signed up for the remaining preadmission courses and only with special permission from each instructor of the major course. BS Accounting Content Perspectives. Within this program, students are required to complete core course requirements that cover a broad range of perspectives necessary for today’s students to matriculate into business positions. Periodic review of syllabi and interviews with faculty ensure adequate coverage of the key perspectives. BS Accounting Core Curriculum Key Perspectives Matrix Influence Legal and Core Ethics Global of Influence Regula- Environ- Techno- Diver- Courses Coverage Issues Political of Social tory mental logical sity Issues Issues Issues Issues Issues Issues ACCT 251 + + + ACCT 252 + + + + BUS 221 + ++ BUS 241 + + + ++ + ++ ECON 201 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ECON 202 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ ++ FIN 370 + + + ++ + ++ MGT 380 ++ + + + + + + ++ MKT 360 ++ + ++ ++ + ++ + + OSC 323 ++ + + + ++ MIS 386 or + + ++ + ++ + ACCT 455* MGT 487 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ ++ or MGT 489 ACCT 305 + + + ACCT 346 ++ + ++ ACCT 350 ++ + + ++ ACCT 351 ++ ++ ++ ACCT 460 ++ ++ ++ + Key: ++ Perspective is readily apparent in several learning activities in the course. + Perspective is included, but not readily apparent or received only slight emphasis. (blank) Perspective is not part of the course. BS Business Administration Content Perspectives. The Business Administration Department has identified overall educational outcomes related to knowledge, values, and skills for all BSBA graduates. This further promotes and ensures the general philosophy within the department to provide our students with an understanding of perspectives that form the context for business. Students in all BSBA specializations are required to complete core courses that address perspectives that form the context for business. BSBA Core Curriculum Key Perspectives Matrix Legal and Core Ethics Global Influence Influence Regula- Environ- Techno- Diversity Courses Coverage Issues of Political of Social tory mental logical Issues
  13. 13. COB Assessment, p. 13 of 22 Issues Issues Issues Issues Issues ACCT 251 + + + ACCT 252 + + + + BUS 221 + ++ BUS 241 + + + ++ + ++ ECON 201 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ECON 202 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ ++ FIN 370 + + + ++ + ++ MGT 380 ++ + + + + + + ++ MKT 360 ++ + ++ ++ + ++ + + OSC 323 ++ + + + ++ MIS 386 + + ++ + ++ + MGT 489 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ ++ BS Economics Content Perspectives. The economics major allows students to select from two specializations: General Economics or Managerial Economics. Students in both specializations are required to complete certain core courses that address perspectives that form the context for business. The following table addresses the coverage provided in each course for the General Economics Specialization for each of the perspectives. This specialization is recommended for students desiring the traditional economics major. The Managerial Economics specialization is recommended for students with an interest in both public and private sector employment and preparation for law school. BS Economics Core Curriculum Key Perspectives Matrix for the General Economics Influence Influence Legal and Environ- Techno- COURSE Ethics Global of Political of Social Regula- mental logical Diversity Coverage Issues Issues Issues tory Issues Issues Issues Issues BUS 221 + ++ ECON 201 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ECON 202 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ + MIS 386 + + ++ + ++ + ECON 301 + + + + ++ + ++ ECON 302 + ++ + + ++ + ++ ECON 310 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ + ECON 324 + + + + + + + + ECON 330 + + ++ + + ECON 332 + + ++ ++ ++ + + + ECON 426 + + + + BS Economics Core Curriculum Key Perspectives Matrix for the Managerial Economics Influence Influence Legal and Environ- Techno- COURSE Ethics Global of Political of Social Regula- mental logical Diversity Coverage Issues Issues Issues tory Issues Issues Issues Issues ACCT 251 + + + ACCT 252 or + + + +
  14. 14. COB Assessment, p. 14 of 22 ACCT 302 BUS 221 + ++ ECON 201 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ECON 202 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ + ++ ++ FIN 370 + + + ++ + ++ ECON 301 + + + + ++ + ++ ECON 302 + ++ + + ++ + ++ ECON 452 + ++ + + ++ + + The Master of Professional Accountancy degree includes coverage of the core curriculum key perspectives as follows: Master of Professional Accountancy Core Curriculum Key Perspectives Matrix Influence Influence Legal and Environ- Techno- COURSE Ethics Global of Political of Social Regula- mental logical Diversity Coverage Issues Issues Issues tory Issues Issues Issues Issues ACCT 510 ++ + ++ ++ ++ + + + ACCT 520 + ++ + ++ + + ACCT 530 + + + ++ + + ACCT 585 ++ + ++ ++ ++ + + + MGT 505 ++ ++ + ++ ++ + + + MGT 525 ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ ++ End-of-Major Evaluation of Student Learning. Following a successful pilot test during Fall Quarter 2002, the COB adopted the ETS Field Examination for Business. Excepting economics majors, the examination currently is administered to senior-level COB majors as part of MGT 489-Strategic Management, an end-of-program capstone course. In order to create a more level playing testing situation, the prerequisites to MGT 489 are now strictly enforced. CB has participated for several terms for which two sets of national norms are available from ETS (2003-2005 and August 2006-December 2006). During those two time periods, CB has 415 625 students have participateding in this assessment program to date. During the 2003-2005 time period, the nationally-normed comparison data is based on 513 institutions with 109,982 individuals 359 participating schools and 24,715 individuals. For the August 2006-December 2006 time period, 181 institutions and 8,986 students participated. Summary results for the overall test appear in the table following. The data reveal that CWU has scored consistently higher than the nationally-normed data. They also provide a starting point from which to assess future improvements. ETS Business Field Exam Overall Results All % At/Below # CWU CWU Schools CWU Quarter Students Mean Mean Mean Fall 2002 85 156.8 151.0 70% Fall 2003 88 155.9 151.9 6070% Winter 2004 138 153.6 151.9 5060% Spring 2004 104 158.8 151.9 7580% Beginning Summer 2005, in order to confirm consistent quality across the 3 sites, the ETS major field exam results were recorded by location of the Ellensburg campus and the centers at Des Moines (formerly known as Sea-Tac) and Lynnwood.
  15. 15. COB Assessment, p. 15 of 22 ETS Major Field Exam Results Quarter Location # Students CWU Mean All Schools % At/Below Mean CWU Mean Summer 2005 Ellensburg 23 164 151.5 95% Des Moines 21 153 151.5 50% Lynnwood 26/21 152/161 151.5 45%/90% CB ALL 91 158 151.5 80% Fall 2005 Ellensburg 16/19 155/160 151.5 65%/85% Des Moines 14 164 151.5 95% Lynnwood 31 156 151.5 70% CB ALL 80 159 151.5 80% Winter 2006 Ellensburg 29/27 161/156 NA NA Des Moines 26 159 NA NA Lynnwood 32 160 NA NA CB ALL 114 159 NA NA Spring 2006 Ellensburg 33/29/26/43 164/163/159/162 NA NA Des Moines 30 154 NA NA Lynnwood 49 155 NA NA CB All 210 160 NA NA Summer 2006 Ellensburg 16/25 157/156 152.5 70%/65% Des Moines 30 151 152.5 30% Lynnwood 27/26 153/158 152.5 45%/75% CB ALL 124 155 152.5 55% Fall 2006 No exams administered Winter 2007 Ellensburg 26/33 158/155 Des Moines 25/21 153/150 Lynnwood 32/34 155/159 CB All 171 155 NA NA Spring 2007 Ellensburg 32/59/25/27 154/157/158/162 NA NA Des Moines 25 163 NA NA Lynnwood 32 158 NA NA CB ALL 200 159 NA NA Summer 2007 Ellensburg 19/23 157/160 NA NA Des Moines 25 155 NA NA Lynnwood 19/24 159/154 NA NA CB ALL 110 157 NA NA Fall 2007 Ellensburg 23/22 167/160 NA NA Des Moines 21 158 NA NA Lynnwood 28 161 NA NA CB ALL 94 162 NA NA In 9 quarters starting in Summer 2005, across 21 classes, Ellensburg campus, with 575 test takers, has had a grand average of 159. Des Moines, with 238 test takers over 10 sections had a grand average of 156. Across 13 exams with 381 test takers, Lynnwood’s grand average is 157. The ETS Field Exam in Business also provides valuable student performance information in eight specific functional areas of business. Seeing no real actionable differences between the three locations of test administration in terms of overall scores, the scores for Ellensburg, Des Moines, and Lynnwood are collapsed across campus in the following discussion of the functional areas of business and effective Winter 2008 the scores will be reported by major as well as location. As revealed in following tables, CWU students consistently perform better in the more quantitative areas of business—accounting, finance, economics, and business analysis. Data from Summer 2006 is a bit worrisome because it shows
  16. 16. COB Assessment, p. 16 of 22 a precipitous drop in accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and international; however it is a single data point and until more data is available, implications are not readily apparent. Accounting Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 50.8 44.0 79% Fall 2003 88 52.1 44.6 85% Winter 2004 138 49.2 44.6 70% Spring 2004 104 56.7 44.6 95% Summer 2005 91 54.0 44.4 90% Fall 2005 80 52.8 44.4 90% Winter 2006 114 54.3 NA NA Spring 2006 210 54.2 NA NA Summer 2006 124 52.0 50.7 55% Winter 2007 171 57.2 NA NA Spring 2007 200 58.8 NA NA Summer 2007 110 57.4 NA NA Fall 2007 94 61.0 Finance Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 43.3 36.3 83% Fall 2003 88 41.8 36.6 75% Winter 2004 138 38.6 36.6 55% Spring 2004 104 41.1 36.6 75% Summer 2005 91 41.8 36.1 80% Fall 2005 80 40.0 36.1 70 Winter 2006 114 43.8 NA NA Spring 2006 210 42.7 NA NA Summer 2006 124 44.8 55.9 5% Winter 2007 171 60.2 NA NA Spring 2007 200 62.2 NA NA Summer 2007 110 60.2 NA NA Fall 2007 94 68.0 Economics Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 46.9 41.6 73% Fall 2003 88 48.1 43.2 70%
  17. 17. COB Assessment, p. 17 of 22 Winter 2004 138 45.7 43.2 55% Spring 2004 104 50.1 43.2 80% Summer 2005 91 48.8 42.7 80% Fall 2005 80 51.3 42.7 85% Winter 2006 114 50.3 NA NA Spring 2006 210 48.2 NA NA Summer 2006 124 46.6 48.0 30% Winter 2007 171 53.2 NA NA Spring 2007 200 53.8 NA NA Summer 2007 110 50.8 NA NA Fall 2007 94 57.0 Quantitative Business Analysis Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 62.3 56.2 69% Fall 2003 88 61.5 56.7 65% Winter 2004 138 60.2 56.7 60% Spring 2004 104 63.1 56.7 75% Summer 2005 91 61.5 36.1 95% Fall 2005 80 65.5 36.1 95% Winter 2006 114 64.0 NA NA Spring 2006 210 66.3 NA NA Summer 2006 124 59.0 47.0 95% Winter 2007 171 48.2 NA NA Spring 2007 200 49.5 NA NA Summer 2007 110 47.4 NA NA Fall 2007 94 52.0 Legal & Social Environment Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 54.2 49.3 70% Fall 2003 88 48.4 49.8 30% Winter 2004 138 47.8 49.8 25% Spring 2004 104 54.6 49.8 65% Summer 2005 91 53.8 49.8 70% Fall 2005 80 52.0 49.8 55% Winter 2006 114 53.8 NA NA Spring 2006 210 51.2 NA NA Summer 2006 124 48.4 46.7 60% Winter 2007 171 44.8 NA NA
  18. 18. COB Assessment, p. 18 of 22 Spring 2007 200 52.0 NA NA Summer 2007 110 49.6 NA NA Fall 2007 94 53.0 International Issues Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 43.5 42.3 54% Fall 2003 88 46.9 44.6 55% Winter 2004 138 43.1 44.6 35% Spring 2004 104 48.8 44.6 65% Summer 2005 91 49.5 44.4 75% Fall 2005 80 50.3 44.4 75% Winter 2006 114 52.3 NA NA Spring 2006 210 51.2 NA NA Summer 2006 124 50.2 54.4 20% Winter 2007 171 59.0 NA NA Spring 2007 200 59.8 NA NA Summer 2007 110 57.6 NA NA Fall 2007 94 64.0 Marketing Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Fall 2002 85 48.9 45.0 63% Fall 2003 88 49.4 47.3 55% Winter 2004 138 46.7 47.3 30% Spring 2004 104 48.7 47.3 55% Summer 2005 91 51.5 46.8 75% Fall 2005 80 50.5 46.8 70% Winter 2006 114 52.5 NA NA Spring 2006 210 54.2 NA NA Summer 2006 124 49.4 53.1 20% Winter 2007 171 55.2 NA NA Spring 2007 200 57.8 NA NA Summer 2007 110 56.6 NA NA Fall 2007 94 59.0 Management Area Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean
  19. 19. COB Assessment, p. 19 of 22 Fall 2002 85 55.7 57.6 48% Fall 2003 88 57.6 57.6 50% Winter 2004 138 56.6 57.6 30% Spring 2004 104 62.3 57.6 60% Summer 2005 91 61.5 57.1 70% Fall 2005 80 65.3 57.1 85% Winter 2006 114 61.8 NA NA Spring 2006 210 63.8 NA NA Summer 2006 124 59.2 55.4 65% Winter 2007 171 57.4 NA NA Spring 2007 200 60.8 NA NA Summer 2007 110 61.2 NA NA Fall 2007 94 64.0 Beginning in the latter part of the Summer 2006, ETS added to the exam the new functional area of Information Systems. The results to date follow. Information Systems Assessment COB Nat'l % At/Below # CWU Mean % Mean % CWU Quarter Students Correct Correct Mean Summer 2006 25 63.0 58.7 75% Winter 2007 171 62.2 NA NA Spring 2007 200 61.7 NA NA Summer 2007 110 62.4 NA NA Fall 2007 94 65.0 To improve on the assessment of the Economics program, a new course has been developed, EC 406, Assessment, effective 2007-2008, which is a required course that is taken by all students majoring in Economics and are about to graduate. In addition, the internally developed assessment exam in economics has been replaced by the Economics exam provided by Educational Testing Service (ETS). Assessment of Student Satisfaction (This section will be updated soon when the new Alumni survey comes in ). Periodically, the university conducts a survey of past graduates in order to assess how respondents perceive their educational experience at CWU after they have spent some time in the workforce. Graduates from the years 1997 and 2001 completed the most recent such survey in 2003. Given that the primary mission of the College of Business is to provide a high-quality education to its students, the survey results detailed below give some idea of what our past graduates think of our program. The first table shows that the overwhelming majority of responding graduates from 1997 and 2001 were either very or mostly satisfied with the quality of their major (business administration / accounting / economics) education. It also reveals that almost half (48%) of the responding graduates were very or mostly satisfied with the assistance they received in preparing for their career. The other half (52%) of the responding graduates were less satisfied with this portion of their education, indicating an area for future improvement.
  20. 20. COB Assessment, p. 20 of 22 Results of Survey of College of Business 1997 and 2001 Graduates (conducted 2003) Satisfaction Satisfaction with Satisfaction with assistance Level quality in major in preparing for career Very 36.49% 18.10% Mostly 54.50% 29.86% Somewhat 8.11% 34.39% Little 0.45% 16.29% None 0.45% 1.36% The next table indicates graduate satisfaction with their education in relation to those skill sets that the graduates themselves deem as most important. At least 60% of the responding graduates were either very or mostly satisfied with each of the skill sets, except in the areas of: working with technology, locating information, and readiness of career. Very few of the responding graduates had no satisfaction with their educations in the listed categories. 1997 and 2001 Graduate Satisfaction with College of Business/CWU Education in Relation to Those Skill Sets the Graduates Deemed as Most Important Learning Working Readiness Satisfactio Writing Speaking Critically Indepen with Locating Proble of n Level Effectivel Effectivel Analyzin - Technolog Informatio m Career y y g dently y n Solving Very 19.91% 22.67% 21.68% 22.07% 17.78% 16.37% 21.43% 16.37% Mostly 46.90% 39.56% 47.79% 53.60% 38.67% 38.50% 48.66% 36.73% Somewhat 29.20% 30.67% 26.55% 18.47% 30.22% 40.71% 27.33% 34.51% Little 3.54% 7.11% 3.98% 4.95% 12.44% 4.42% 2.68% 11.50% None 0.44% 0.00% 0.00% 0.90% 0.89% 0.00% 0.00% 0.88% The third table of results shows the responding graduates’ beliefs about several key overall areas of their educations and experiences at CWU. 1997 and 2001 Graduate Beliefs Regarding Overall Education and Experiences Belief about CWU Overall Overall Career Overall Personal education or Intellectual Training Growth experience Growth Very Well 33.78% 24.89% 29.78% Adequately 57.33% 43.56% 46.67% Neutral 7.11% 22.22% 18.67% Inadequately 1.78% 8.00% 3.56% Very Poorly 0.00% 1.33% 1.33% The same survey found that 25.11% of responding COB graduates rated their overall education from CWU as excellent, while 57.40% of respondents rated it as good. Only 17.49% rated their overall CWU education as average or fair. It is also interesting to note that 71.63% of the survey respondents currently hold full-time positions within their intended field. Another 19.23% hold other full-time positions, while 9.14% hold part-time or temporary positions.
  21. 21. COB Assessment, p. 21 of 22 Retention Practices in the COB The COB utilizes a number of practices to recruit and retain high caliber students. These include: 1) special advising programs, 2) scholarship programs, 3) COB support for student organizations, and 4) promotion of student successes. These programs are briefly described in this section. 1) Special Advising Programs. In response to assessment information garnered from past graduating student questionnaires that showed pre-major advising to be the greatest single source of dissatisfaction (other than parking), the COB created a “walk-in” pre-major advising center in Shaw- Smyser Hall. The primary goal of the center is to effectively and efficiently facilitate the transition of students into COB major programs. This is accomplished by one-on-one advising by center staff and group sessions coordinated by the center to respond to the information needs of pre-major students. Based on feedback from numerous students and faculty, this program has been tremendously successful. 2) Scholarship Programs. Part of the COB effort to attract and retain higher-caliber students is linked to its scholarship programs. For use during the coming academic year, 2004-05, the COB will award over $16,000 in scholarships to high-achieving students in business programs. Donors have specified that the COB should award these funds to COB majors through an open competition. (COB students oftentimes apply for and receive scholarships through programs that are outside the control of the COB; these scholarships are not included in the amounts cited above.) As stated earlier, in 2006, CB awarded over $40,000 in scholarships; in 2007, the amount was nearly $60,000. COB Support for Student Organizations. The student-centered faculty and staff of the CB show strong support for the non-classroom academic activities of students and student organizations. Related to student organizations, the CB assigns faculty advisors and provides office space, meeting space, and clerical support. The faculty assigned as advisors participate fully in the activities of the student organization, such as attending regular meetings and travelling with students to conferences. The results are telling. The marketing club has won 2 years in a row Outstanding Collegiate Chapter as judged by the American Marketing Association. Society for Human Resources has placed Top 10 nationally among since 1994. 3) 4) Promotion of Student Successes. The CB promotes the successes of its students through various means, including the CB Annual Honors Banquet, CB web site, and articles published in the Beacon, the CB newsletter magazine published twice yearly. The CB faculty and staff believe the promotion of student successes is a major factor in student retention. Several recent examples follow. • CWU’s accounting program continues to shine as one of the region’s most successful. The latest news strengthens that claim. In Washington state, four of the top 10 scores on the November 2003 Certified Public Accountant exam were recorded by Central alumni. Michelle Noland, who studied at CWU-Lynnwood, posted the state’s top score. Other CWU top 10 finishers are Jeffrey Buege (CWU-Ellensburg), James Ramborger (CWU-Lynnwood) and Hyun Lee (CWU-SeaTac), in the fourth, fifth and 10th spots, respectively. • The Institute of Internal Auditors notified Paul Lunkes that he earned the William S. Smith Student Highest Achievement Award for outstanding performance on the May 2000 Certified Internal Auditor Examination. Paul achieved the highest score of any student who sat for the May 2000 examination. He received an all-expense paid trip to Buenos Aires, Argentina in June 2001 where he attended the IIA’s 60th International Conference and received his award. (too old…got anything more recent?) • College of Business students Cathlin Jensen and Lacey Scheuerlein received 1st place at the 2003 Delta Epislon Chi Career Development Conference in Entrepreneurship. Cathlin graduated in June 2003 with a BS in Business Administration with specializations in Finance,
  22. 22. COB Assessment, p. 22 of 22 BS in Economics, and a certificate in Supply Chain Management. Lacey graduated in ??? with a BS in Business Administration specializing in Marketing Management and a BA in Public Relations (???this degree right?). With the help of Professors Ruth Lapsley, Ron Elkins and Joe Bradley, the students composed a 10-page business proposal establishing an espresso shop in Ellensburg. • One of CWU's two entries in the 2004 University of Washington Undergraduate Tax Competition placed third this year. 18 teams entered the competition held during January 29 and 30 at the UW School of Business. The competition is completed in two parts over two days. Competitors, in teams of 3 or 4 students, have four hours to complete a written tax problem about taxable income in day 1. From the 18 teams competing on day 1, four teams were chosen as finalists. The finalists were given a second tax problem, requiring tax planning, on the second day. They had four hours to prepare a presentation to mock clients. Then each team gave its group presentation. There were two teams from CWU: Becky Beach, Mary Weaver, Hannah Moore & Julie Maxwell on Team 1, and Matt Peterson, Joe Reid, David Angotti & Andrew Amrine on Team 2. Professor Fred McDonald worked closely with these students, clearly doing did a great job of preparing them for the competition and accompanied our teams to UW. Reflections on CB Assessment and Continuous Quality Improvement Numerous positive changes have occurred in recent years within the CB to better align its goals, objectives, and strategies with its mission. Continuous improvement processes have been developed and implemented in key areas to ensure better advancement of the mission (WHAT ARE THESE???). Assessment activities are becoming more routine. Significant improvements have been made in the processes of guiding and supporting the faculty in the areas of instructional effectiveness and intellectual, professional, service, and faculty development activities. (WHAT ARE THESE?)

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