1511 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
                                                                   Washington, DC 20007

       ...
environment, and address the triple bottom line, economic-environmental-social,
throughout the supply chain.

The goals of...
•   Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Social Indicators
         http://www.globalreporting.org/GRIGuidelines/index.htm
  ...
Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) Management where manure is used as fertilizer -
minimizing impacts of animal feeding oper...
4.9 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA): compilation and evaluation of the inputs, outputs
and the potential environmental impacts...
does not need to be reprocessed before it can be used again” ( http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-
hw/muncpl/reduce.htm#reuse...
♦ All materials and process inputs and outputs are safe for human and ecological
  health in all phases of the product lif...
5.3    Use of Sustainable Agricultural Materials in Textile. Sustainably grown
      agricultural materials used in textil...
minimum number of known harmful pollutants, and higher achievement levels reducing
many pollutants.

The goal is to provid...
Sustainable Textile Supply Chain Achievement Matrix
              Covers all textile product stages: raw materials, transp...
Notes for Achievement Matrix

   1.    Renewable energy means Green-e Power. See also sec. 4.16.

   2.    Protect native ...
5.     Safe for Public Health & Environment -- The baseline for the percent reductions for
         toxic and media pollut...
6.6 (cont’d) Social indicators.

         Indicators for Sustainable Textile Standard: This Standard uses the
            ...
   Metrics that demonstrate the cumulative achievement level
      Tools used such as results of a publicly available li...
Figure 1. The General Product Life Cycle


                                                Raw Materials Extraction


    ...
Appendix A (Informative)

Guidance on the Use of the Sustainable Textile Standard


A.1     General Guidance

The global t...
•   Diversify crops (including livestock) and cultural practices to enhance the
       biological and economic stability o...
generated where they are reused in the production process provided:

(i) Only tank storage is involved, and the entire pro...
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  1. 1. 1511 Wisconsin Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20007 Telephone 202-338-3131 Fax 202-338-2800 Email MTS@sustainableproducts.com Web http://MTS.sustainableproducts.com MTS@sustainableproducts.com Let us create a standard to which the wise and honest can repair. George Washington Sustainable Textile Standard Final Approved Consensus Ballot Version, June 28, 2003 CONTENTS Page 1. Purpose & Goals 1 2. Scope 2 3. References & Tools 2 4. Definitions 3 5. General Requirements 7 5.1 Consistent with Achievement Matrix in Section 6, Sustainable Textile Must be Evaluated Over the Supply Chain for Multiple Environmental Benefits/Impacts 7 5.2 Product Labeling & Marking 7 5.3 Use of Sustainable Agricultural Materials in Textile 8 5.4 Sustainable Natural Animal Textiles 8 6. Levels of Required Attributes Achieving Sustainable Textile Performance in the Matrix 8 6.1 Safe for Public Health & Environment 8 6.2 Renewable Energy 9 6.3 Renewable & Recycled Materials 9 6.4 Facility & Company Based Achievements 9 6.5 Takeback, Sustainable Reuse & End of Life Management 9 6.6 Social Indicators 9 7. Certification of Compliance With Standard 13 Figure 1 The General Product Life Cycle 15 Appendix A (Informative) Guidance on the Use of Sustainable Textile Standard 16 1. PURPOSE & GOALS The purpose of the sustainable textile standard is to provide a market-based definition for Sustainable Textile, establish performance requirements for public health and Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability printed on recycled paper
  2. 2. environment, and address the triple bottom line, economic-environmental-social, throughout the supply chain. The goals of this Sustainable Textile Standard are to: a) Increase the economic value of sustainable textile throughout the supply chain and enhance market demand for sustainable textile products. b) Provide information that enables specifiers to sort out the complex information on sustainable attributes. c) Identify other consensus based standards and Sustainable Textile. d) Educate and instruct all stakeholders in the textile supply chain. This Standard is intended to help raw material suppliers, converters, manufacturers and end-users. Adherence to this Standard and achievement of high levels of sustainable attribute performance could result in:  Cost savings  Design innovation  Product differentiation  Long term customer relationships  Liability reduction  Ecological restoration 2. SCOPE The scope of the Standard enables organizations throughout the textile supply chain to apply performance requirements to achieve sustainable attributes and certify compliance with levels of achievement through quantifiable metrics. The Standard is inclusive, is based on life cycle assessment (LCA) principles, and provides benchmarks for continuous improvement and innovation. Application of this Sustainable Textile Standard is intended to allow inclusive participation and encourage the progressive movement of the textile industry toward sustainability. This Standard identifies six levels of achievement by which textile materials and products can measure and demonstrate, in an understandable way, specific attributes that indicate progress toward sustainability. This standard is voluntary yet emphasizes disclosure of environmental and sustainable performance information, both impacts and benefits. Any products or process can participate in this standard if they are able to achieve the basic minimum in Level 1 of the Achievement Matrix in section 6. This standard does not apply to packaging of sustainable textile. 3. REFERENCES & TOOLS Rather than create new lists or requirements, the Standard references the following existing consensus approaches & tools. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 2 printed on recycled paper
  3. 3. • Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Social Indicators http://www.globalreporting.org/GRIGuidelines/index.htm • Stockholm Toxic Chemicals List http://www.chem.unep.ch/publications.htm • Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) ISO General Principles Standard http://www.iso.ch/iso/en/CatalogueDetailPage.CatalogueDetail?CSNUMBER=23151 • General Product Life Cycle Diagram (Figure 1, p. 15) • Federal Trade Commission Environmental Marketing Guides http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/buspubs/greenguides.htm • US Green Building Council LEED Rating System LCA Credit http://www.usgbc.org/LEED/ existing/leed_existing.asp • FSC Certified Wood Practices http://www.certifiedwood.org/ • Green-e Power http://www.resource-solutions.org/Green-epage.htm Additional guidance and information on use of this Sustainable Textile Standard is provided in the Appendix. 4. DEFINITIONS 4.1 EPA/Purdue/CTI Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Soil Erosion & Runoff Control: These practices improve soil productivity and prevent water pollution that adversely affects biota including spawning grounds. BMPs provide benefits at the raw materials extraction stage. These practices developed by EPA, Purdue University, and Conservation Technology Information Center, can be viewed at http://www.epa.gov/watertrain/agmodule/ with detailed descriptions, manuals, and photos of practices. They allow for local variables, e.g. weather, pests, soil, & type of farm, and are summarized and slightly modified as follows: Conservation Tillage - leaving crop residue (plant materials from past harvests) on the soil surface reduces runoff and soil erosion, conserves soil moisture, helps keep nutrients and pesticides on the field, and improves soil, water, and air quality; Crop Nutrient Management for Organic fields - fully managing and accounting for all nutrient inputs helps ensure nutrients are available to meet crop needs while reducing nutrient movements off fields. It also helps prevent excessive buildup in soils and helps protect air quality; Pest Management - varied organic methods for keeping insects, weeds, disease, and other pests below economically harmful levels while protecting soil, water, and air quality; Conservation Buffers - from simple grassed waterways to riparian areas, buffers provide an additional barrier of protection by capturing potential pollutants that might otherwise move into surface waters. Irrigation Water Management - reducing nonpoint source pollution of ground and surface waters caused by irrigation systems; Grazing Management where manure is used for fertilizer - minimizing the water quality impacts of grazing and browsing activities on pasture and range lands; Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 3 printed on recycled paper
  4. 4. Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs) Management where manure is used as fertilizer - minimizing impacts of animal feeding operations and waste discharges through runoff controls, waste storage, waste utilization, and nutrient management; Erosion and Sediment Control - conserving soil and reducing the mass of sediment reaching a water body, protecting both agricultural land, water quality, and habitat. 4.2 Biodegradable: "Reliable scientific evidence that the entire product or package will completely break down and return to nature, i.e., decompose into elements found in nature within a reasonably short period of time after customary disposal (16 C.F.R. § 260.7 (b))." 4.3 Closed Loop Process: Part of an industrial production process; not part of a waste management process. Materials reclaimed and returned in a closed-loop process are neither classified as, defined as, nor operate as, a waste, i.e., any discarded material. Materials in a closed loop process are treated as commodities in a manner designed to avoid loss or release to the environment (See generally, 40 C.F.R. § 261.4(a)(8)). See background in Appendix A.3. 4.4 Compostable: “Competent and reliable scientific evidence that all materials in the product or package will break down into, or otherwise become part of, usable compost (e.g., soil conditioning material, mulch) in a safe and timely manner in an appropriate composting program or facility, or in a home compost pile or device (16 C.F.R § 260.7 (c)).” 4.5 Continuous Improvement: Continuous improvement is a process used in total quality management, where a company through its routine course of business, continuously improves its products and processes. 4.6 Design for the Environment (DfE): Through life-cycle assessment, DfE considers all environmental implications or stages of a product: energy and materials used, its manufacture and packaging, transportation, consumer use, reuse or recycling, and disposal. All effects a product has on the environment are examined during its design phase. All life cycle stages are analyzed including a full assessment of all inputs to the product, the company’s operations related to the product, how the product is used, and final product disposition whether reused, taken back, or disposed of (State of Minnesota DfE Toolkit www.moea.state.mn.us/p2/dfe.cfm). 4.7 Endocrine Disruptor “is an external agent that interferes in some way with the role of natural hormones in the body," (EPA Special Report on Environmental Endocrine Disruption, 1997). Endocrine disruptors interfere with the endocrine or hormonal systems of humans and wildlife, and might result in cancer, harm to reproductive systems, thyroid damage, or other adverse consequences (Ibid). See background in Appendix A.3. 4.8 Life Cycle: Consecutive and interlinked stages of a product system, from raw material acquisition or generation of natural resources to the final disposition. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 4 printed on recycled paper
  5. 5. 4.9 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA): compilation and evaluation of the inputs, outputs and the potential environmental impacts of a product system throughout its life cycle. See Figure 1, p. 15. 4.10 Life Cycle Design: An approach for designing more ecologically and economically sustainable product systems, integrating environmental requirements into the earliest stages of design. In life cycle design, environmental, performance, cost, cultural and legal requirements are balanced. (EPA Introduction to Environmental Accounting June 1995). 4.11 Life Cycle Impact Assessment: phase of life cycle assessment aimed at understanding and evaluating the magnitude and significance of the potential environmental impacts of a product system. 4.12 Metric: a standard of measurement. 4.13 Pollution Prevention: Changing the existing or planned operations so that the volume and/or toxicity of wastes are minimized, so that waste generation is prevented. Pollution Prevention (P2) is the reduction or elimination of pollution at the source (source reduction) instead of at the end-of-the-pipe or stack. Pollution prevention occurs when raw materials, water, energy and other resources are utilized more efficiently, when less harmful substances are substituted for hazardous ones, and when toxic substances are eliminated from the production process. 4.14 Precautionary Principle: Move away from downstream control strategies and instead, emphasize upstream prevention. 1) Emphasize preventing environmental harm in the first place, 2) In case of scientific uncertainty, avoid discharges, 3) Shifts the burden of proof to avoiding actions that are persistent-toxic-bioaccumulating, 4) Is guided by clean production strategies and industrial ecology (European Environmental Agency 2003) 4.15 Primary Conversion Process: A process that refines or converts a raw fossil fuel or biomass into a material used by traditional manufacturing processes. 4.16 Renewable Energy: For the purposes of this Standard, renewable energy means Green-e power. The non-profit organization Center for Resource Solutions established the Green-e Renewable Electricity Certification Program to encourage consumer confidence in buying "green" electricity. Green-e is the nation's first voluntary certification and verification program for "green" electricity products. The criteria require that at least 50% of the supply is generated from the sun, water, wind, burning of wastes (biomass) or geothermal heat from the earth. In addition, in the use of any traditional fuel, emissions of sulfur dioxide (which causes acid rain), nitrogen oxide (which causes smog) and carbon dioxide (which causes climate change) must be lower than average. The companies that receive the Green-e designation must agree to an annual audit to ensure they have purchased a satisfactory amount of "renewable" power: http://www.green-e.org. The Green-e Standard is at http://www.green- e.org/ipp/standard_for_marketers.html. 4.17 Reuse: “Use a product more than once, either for the same purpose or for a different purpose. Reusing, where possible, is preferable to recycling because the item Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 5 printed on recycled paper
  6. 6. does not need to be reprocessed before it can be used again” ( http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non- hw/muncpl/reduce.htm#reuse). 4.18 Reusable: Reusable means the potential of a product for reuse as defined in 4.17, and that facilities exist to make such reuse economically feasible. 4.19 Recycled Content: The amount of material by weight "collected, separated or otherwise recovered from the solid waste stream for use in the form of raw materials, in the manufacture or assembly of a new package or product (16 C.F.R. § 260.7 (d))." See background in Appendix A.3. 4.20 Recycling: “Recycling is a series of activities that includes collecting materials that would otherwise be considered waste, sorting and processing recyclables into raw materials such as fibers, and manufacturing raw materials into new products” (http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/muncpl/recycle.htm). 4.21 Supply Chain: the all inclusive set of links from raw materials to customer, including extraction, transportation, fuels, manufacturing, and use, i.e., the network of retailers, distributors, transporters, storage facilities and suppliers that participate in the sale, delivery and production of a particular product (Investorwords.com 2003). 4.22 Sustainable Agriculture: (Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990) “Means an integrated system of plant and animal production practices having site-specific application that will, over the long term: • satisfy human food and fiber needs • enhance environmental quality and the natural resource base upon which the agricultural economy depends • make efficient use of nonrenewable resources and on-farm resources and integrate, where appropriate, natural biological cycles and controls • sustain the economic vitality of farm operations • enhance the quality of life for farmers and society as a whole Sustainable agriculture protects native vegetation, habitat & forests, and where forest harvesting arises in the textile supply chain, uses FSC Certified Wood practices. 4.23 Sustainable Reuse: Reuse is sustainable when it includes social supply chain considerations specified in the table in section 6.6, and the product is EITHER: • reused indefinitely, maintaining performance and quality characteristics and environmental integrity without harmful releases to health or environment, as part of a closed loop takeback program in which only chemically contaminated used product is disposed of, OR • reused, and then returned safely to natural systems without any adverse effects to public health and environment. See example in Appendix A.3. 4.24 Sustainable Textile: A sustainable textile meets or exceeds the environmental, social, & economic performance requirements set forth in this Standard’s “Supply Chain Matrix” in section 6. These products and their related systems have the following attributes: Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 6 printed on recycled paper
  7. 7. ♦ All materials and process inputs and outputs are safe for human and ecological health in all phases of the product life cycle ♦ All energy, material and process inputs come from renewable or recycled sources ♦ All materials are capable of returning safely to either natural systems or industrial systems ♦ All stages in the product life cycle actively support the reuse or recycling of these materials at the highest possible level of quality ♦ All product life cycle stages enhance social well being 4.25 Textile: 1) natural and synthetic filaments (and fibers) for use in yarns, 2) the filaments and fibers used in the preparation of woven, knitted, tufted, non-woven and other fabrics and materials, including backings and coatings 3) fabrics and other materials made from filaments, fibers and yarns and 4) apparel and other use articles made from the above materials. See Textile Fibers, Dyes, Finishes and Processes – A Concise Guide, (Needles 1986). 5. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS In order to be considered a sustainable product, a sustainable textile must provide environmental, economic, and social benefits while protecting and enhancing the needs of future generations, public health, welfare and environment over their full commercial cycle, from raw materials extraction to final disposition. A sustainable textile must also provide the equivalent in performance and quality to other textiles. A sustainable textile may be petrochemical-based or bio-based but must demonstrate throughout its supply chain, multiple attributes that protect public health and environment and foster healthy and prosperous conditions for human and ecological systems. Claims made on all sustainable attributes must be certified pursuant to section 7 with publicly reviewable documentation. 5.1 Consistent with the Achievement Matrix in Section 6, Sustainable Textile Must be Evaluated Over the Supply Chain for Multiple Environmental Benefits/Impacts. LCA is one recognized tool to do this. LCA must be used for communications using the word “sustainable,” as part of the competent scientific evidence requirement pursuant to Federal Trade Commission (FTC), EPA, & Attorneys Generals’ product marketing requirements (See 16 C.F.R. § 260.7(a). LCA is used to identify environmental benefits and areas for improvement in the supply chain for all environmental media, including local environmental issues in the production of agricultural bio-based products. See Figure 1. EPA Final Environmentally Preferable Product Guidance sets forth as a “Guiding Principle: Life Cycle Perspective/Multiple Attributes- A product or service's environmental preferability is a function of multiple attributes from a life cycle perspective (2002).” Also relevant is the ISO General Principles LCA Standard. 5.2 Product Labeling & Marking: Manufacturers warranting or certifying compliance with this Standard pursuant to section 7, may mark or label their sustainable textile product and literature consistent with the appropriate level in the Achievement Matrix. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 7 printed on recycled paper
  8. 8. 5.3 Use of Sustainable Agricultural Materials in Textile. Sustainably grown agricultural materials used in textiles must demonstrate sustainable performance attributes throughout their supply chain and production system. Producers should be able to account for and report on these attributes. The attribute performance should be localized to the source of agricultural raw materials. Sustainable textile product manufacturers using agricultural raw materials should be able to demonstrate sustainable performance attributes resulting from the use of sustainable agriculturally grown raw materials. See Appendix A for guidance - Performance Attributes for Sustainable Agricultural Textile. 5.4 Sustainable Natural Animal Textiles: Sustainable textile may be from natural animal fiber provided that sustainable agricultural best management practices defined in § 4.1 are followed for grazing management, conservation buffers, and animal feeding operation management, organic feed is used, and the animal is not harmed to obtain the fiber, as certified by the supplier pursuant to section 7. See Appendix A. 6. LEVELS OF REQUIRED ATTRIBUTES ACHIEVING SUSTAINABLE TEXTILE PERFORMANCE IN THE MATRIX In order to be certified a Sustainable Textile in accordance with this Standard, the textile must demonstrate a level of achievement specified in the five categories of sustainable attributes. Level 1 is a prerequisite and mandatory for all sustainable textile. There are four possible certification levels based on the total number of points achieved from the Matrix: CERTIFICATION LEVELS: Certified Textile: 6 to 10 points Silver Rated Textile: 11 to 18 points Gold Rated Textile: 19 to 25 points Platinum Rated Textile: 26 to 30 points Innovation Credits awarded above 30 points require special recognition. Only the Levels in the Facility and Company Based Achievements Category are cumulative, meaning, e.g., a Level 3 Facility and Company Based Achievement must meet the requirements of Levels 1-3. Levels 1-6 of the Matrix range from simply inventorying pollutants, energy, and materials, to substantial achievements toward sustainable textile (defined in § 4.24). Reporting of social indicators is a prerequisite for all levels as specified in Level 1 of the Matrix and the Table in section 6.6. The following Sustainable Attributes must exist at all product stages - raw materials extraction or formulation, transportation, manufacturing, use, and end of life management: 6.1 Safe for Public Health and Environment. This Matrix Category contains initial achievement levels that simply inventory pollutants and energy use adversely affecting public health and environment. It specifies intermediate achievement levels reducing a Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 8 printed on recycled paper
  9. 9. minimum number of known harmful pollutants, and higher achievement levels reducing many pollutants. The goal is to provide a reasonable and achievable pathway for textile to be safe for public health and environment over the supply chain. 6.2 Renewable Energy. This Matrix category contains an initial achievement level that simply inventories renewable content of energy used. Higher achievement levels require higher use of renewables as measured by Green-e Power use. CO2 reductions are covered in 6.1. The highest achievement levels require substantial use of renewables. For purposes of this standard, renewable energy is defined in § 4.16. The goal is to provide a reasonable and achievable pathway for textile to be renewable over the supply chain and not contribute to climate change. 6.3 Renewable & Recycled Materials. Renewable materials are produced by sustainable agriculture as defined in § 4.22, and FSC Certified Wood forest practices. Recycled materials are measured by percent recycled content. Progressively higher levels of renewable materials and recycled content are required. Achievement levels range from simple inventorying of renewable and recycled materials at Level 1, to requiring substantial percent of renewable and recycled materials at high Levels. The goal is to provide a reasonable and achievable pathway for renewable and recycled materials use by textile over the supply chain. 6.4 Facility and Company Based Achievements. This category encourages corporate wide environmental responsibility and achievements. Achievement levels range from simple adoption of an environmental policy and having an environmental management system, to supply chain activities like LCA and disclosing the percentage of sustainable textile purchased, made, and sold. The goal is to encourage corporate wide achievements in addition to those for sustainable textile. 6.5 Takeback, Sustainable Reuse and End of Life Management. This category encourages product reuse and takeback reducing waste to landfill and incineration. This category accounts for downcycling of goods, materials and energy from their highest to lowest use after production and prior to final disposition, encouraging reuse and avoiding disposal. The goal is to provide a reasonable and achievable pathway for textile takeback over the supply chain, avoiding landfilling and incineration. 6.6 Social Indicators. This category requires reporting of specified social indicators below for all Levels of Sustainable Textile. The goal is to improve social equity and the competitive advantage of sustainable textile throughout the supply chain. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 9 printed on recycled paper
  10. 10. Sustainable Textile Supply Chain Achievement Matrix Covers all textile product stages: raw materials, transportation, manufacturing, use, & final disposition MATERIAL Cumulative Takeback, Achievement Safe for Public Renewable or Recycled Levels Sustainable Levels of Health & Renewable¹ or blend of both Facility or Reuse, & Sustainable Environment Energy Blends receive 50% of the point Company End of Life Textile level due to difficulty in "un- Based Management zipping" materials. Formal 1 Inventory (see note Inventory (note Environmental 3). Standard certifier 3) Inventory (note 3) & Report Management Identify [all pre- 100 % of System (EMS) (§7) defines system Global Reporting Initiative Adopted requisites] boundaries/universe. energy and Takeback (GRI) List in Section 6.6 for No Stockholm Electrical & all Product Stages Environmental Program [point Thermal Policy Chemicals (note 3) [1] [1] level] [1] [1] [1] Inventory (note 3) Identify Toxic Chemicals on 1% Green-e 1% to 20% Adopted Demonstrate ED/NIST/EPA/Traci Power at Renewable or Recycled Design for Actual Pilot 2 List. Manufacturing Raw Material Environment Takeback [point [2] Facilities Process Program level] [2] [2] [2] [2] Inventory air, water & waste (media) pollutants, & 2% to 10% 21% to 40% ISO 14001 1% - 5%: Adverse Exposure to Green-e Power Renewable or Recycled EMS Product 3 Endocrine Disruptors. at Raw Material Certification Takeback 1% - 25% reduction Manufacturing [point of toxic chemical & Facilities [3] [3] [3] level] media pollutants [3] [3] 41% to 60% Publicly 26% - 50% reduction 11% to 25% Recycled or Renewable Raw Available of toxic chemical & Green-e Power Material. For Renewable: Environmental 6% to 10% 4 media pollutants. No at Transitional Organic note 4, Targets, Product Adverse Exposure to Manufacturing Objectives Takeback [point EPA/Purdue BMPs & FSC² Endocrine Disruptors. Facilities [4] and Metrics level] [4] [4] [4] [4] 51% - 75% reduction 26% to 50% 61% to 80% LCA Process of toxic chemicals & Green-e Power Recycled or Renewable Raw Or 11% to 15% media pollutants, & at Material. For Renewable: Transparent Product 5 No Adverse Transitional Organic note 4, Closed Loop Manufacturing Takeback [point Exposure to Facilities Process level] EPA/Purdue BMPs & FSC² Endocrine Disruptors [5] [5] [5] [5] [5] 81% - 100% No or de minimus Recycled or Renewable Raw Disclose % Greater Than Levels of toxic Material. For Renewable: Sustainable 15% 6 51% to 100% Chemicals and media Green-e at all Transitional Organic note 4, Textile Takeback & pollutants Facilities EPA/Purdue BMPs & FSC² Purchased, Sustainable [point [6] [ [6] Made & Sold Reuse (4.21) level] [6] [6] 6] Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 10 printed on recycled paper
  11. 11. Notes for Achievement Matrix 1. Renewable energy means Green-e Power. See also sec. 4.16. 2. Protect native vegetation, habitat & forests and where forest harvesting arises in the textile supply chain, use FSC Certified Wood practices. 3. Inventory Criteria Used: • Safe for Public Health & Environment- Level 1: identify all supply chain material & process inputs to 1000 ppm, including Stockholm Convention banned chemicals: pesticides (Aldrin, Chlordane, DDT, Heptachlor, Hexachlorobenzene, Dieldrin, Mirex, Toxaphene), industrial products (PCBs, polychlorinated biphenyls) and byproducts, i.e., unintentionally formed chemicals (polychlorinated dioxins and furans). The Convention was signed by 90 countries in 2001, and is currently undergoing ratification. Level 2: Inventory Toxic Chemicals on Environmental Defense (ED)/NIST/EPA/Traci List contained on product questionnaire under site data, located at http://mts.sustainableproducts.com/standards.htm, scroll to page bottom under Sustainable Textile Standard, attachment for Note 3. Level 3: Inventory air, water & waste (media) pollutants: climate change, acid rain, smog, ozone depletion, water effluents, indoor air quality (VOCs), habitat alteration, solid & hazardous waste & embodied energy (purchased fuels & energy). Use NIST/EPA/Traci metrics cited in note on “Level 2” above in questionnaire under site data. • Renewable Energy- mj/kg/yr renewable & non renewable & CO2 generated/yr. Thermal energy means: energy such as heat or steam for industrial, commercial, heating or cooling purposes, including through the sequential use of energy. See generally 40 C.F.R. § 72.2 (cogeneration Unit) and 40 C.F.R. § 72.6(c) (Acid Rain Program). • Renewable Material- kg/kg/yr renewable & nonrenewable • Recycled Material- % recycled content • Takeback, Sustainable Reuse & End of Life Management- Takeback is % of the firm's market, as measured in physical volume of sales or in value of sales, in which a takeback program exists; a description must be provided for where such takeback programs exist. Sustainable Reuse is kg actual total reused/kg total input/yr. • Baseline- The baseline for the Matrix for Sustainable Textile is the identified Inventory amount in Level 1. 4. Transitional Organic – The transitional fields for crop production must stay transitional for 3 years minimum. Transitional means that pesticide and fertilizer use has ceased, but the fields are not certified organic. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 11 printed on recycled paper
  12. 12. 5. Safe for Public Health & Environment -- The baseline for the percent reductions for toxic and media pollutants in levels 3-5 is the Inventory identified in Level 1. Summary of Points from Matrix CATEGORY POSSIBLE POINTS ACTUAL POINTS Within Category Within Category Safe for Public Health & 6 Environment Renewable Energy 6 Renewable & Recycled Material or Blend of Both 6 Blends receive 50% of the point level due to difficulty in "un-zipping" materials. Facility or Company Based 6 Takeback, Sustainable Reuse, & End of Life 6 Management TOTAL POINTS: 30 Innovation Credits [up to 3 Innovation 3 Credits can be obtained] CERTIFICATION LEVELS: Certified Textile: 6 to 10 points Silver Rated Textile: 11 to 18 points Gold Rated Textile: 19 to 25 points Platinum Rated Textile: 26 to 30 points Innovation Credits awarded above 30 points require special recognition. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 12 printed on recycled paper
  13. 13. 6.6 (cont’d) Social indicators. Indicators for Sustainable Textile Standard: This Standard uses the following selected Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Social Indicators: Social Indicators Area Description Breakdown of workforce, employment Labor type, employment contract workforce practices Employmen retained vs. temporary workforce. and t Net employment creation, turnover decent Employee benefits, beyond those legally work mandated Health & Recording and notification of occupational Safety accidents and disease. Description of policies and procedures dealing with all aspects of HR relevant to operations including monitoring Strategy & mechanisms and results. Human Mgt Description of policies and procedures to Rights evaluate and address human rights performance within the supply chain and contractors, including monitoring systems and results. Description of policy and procedures Child Labor excluding child labor including monitoring systems and results. Policies to manage impacts on communities in areas affected by activities Society Community as well as description of procedures to address this issue, including monitoring systems and results. 7. CERTIFICATION OF COMPLIANCE WITH STANDARD In order to comply with this Standard, suppliers and manufacturers must disclose information that includes:  Statement of the Achievement Level it has attained for specific Sustainable Textile Achievement Attributes for all product stages Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 13 printed on recycled paper
  14. 14.  Metrics that demonstrate the cumulative achievement level  Tools used such as results of a publicly available life cycle assessment that comply with ISO LCA General Principles Standard pursuant to 5.1 7.1 Express Warranty or Equivalent Option. Suppliers and manufacturers adhering to this standard expressly warrant in a certification (§ 7) submitted along with the level of sustainable attributes achieved (§ 6) for their products: "The vendor/manufacturer expressly warrants as part of its purchase agreement, that the data and responses to the information requests of this standard are accurate and reliable to the best of the vendor's/manufacturer's knowledge." This express warranty is a general requirement for adherence to this standard; this warranty and its documentation will be publicly available. 7.1.1 Equivalent Option. An equivalent option can be used satisfying § 7.1, in lieu of providing the express warranty above for general adherence to this standard. To do this, suppliers and manufacturers must certify in writing that its communications regarding this standard and applicable sections, comply with the Federal Trade Commission Environmental Marketing Guides at 16 C.F.R. Part 260 (1998) for accurate, reliable, and documented communications: http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/grnrule/guides980427.htm. This certification must also state that "both the express and implied meaning of the certification about the data, responses to information, and provisions of the standard, is reasonable and based on competent and reliable scientific evidence prepared by qualified professionals in the relevant area, using procedures to produce accurate and reliable results." See 16 C.F.R. § 260.5. Further, such certification and its documentation will be publicly available. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 14 printed on recycled paper
  15. 15. Figure 1. The General Product Life Cycle Raw Materials Extraction Transportation Bulk Processing Transportation Engineered and Specialty Materials W The Earth Transportation (air, soil, water a and Biosphere) s Product Manufacturing t e Transportation Recycle s Packaging for Shipping Transportation Reuse Use and Service Transportation Treatment, Disposal Material processed for reuse in another product system Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 15 printed on recycled paper
  16. 16. Appendix A (Informative) Guidance on the Use of the Sustainable Textile Standard A.1 General Guidance The global textile Industry uses many chemicals and processes harming human health and environment. It is faced with major competitive challenges. Encouragingly, a number of corporate textile leaders have successfully addressed this problem by substantially reducing their environmental burdens, while improving social and economic equity throughout the supply chain. The leading stakeholders in the textile industry are striving to become more sustainable. This Sustainable Textile Standard responds to this challenge and is a way for leaders in the industry to foster innovation and capture environmental, economic and social benefits associated with a transition to sustainability. Participants in this Standard recognize that a major transition is necessary given the “weight of evidence” regarding the condition of the global environment and need for improved economic and social prosperity. There is a great opportunity to create life-affirming sustainable products with substantial global value. By applying this Standard, stakeholders throughout the textile supply chain will significantly and continuously improve their sustainable product performance realizing:  Design innovation by thoughtful consideration of materials and resources.  Value added materials and products designed for safe reclamation and reuse.  Ecological restoration.  Long term strengthened customer relationships by offering cutting edge solutions to environmental problems.  A shared environmental agenda serving local communities.  Reduced liability and need for regulation.  Compatibility with other market trends such as clean vehicles, sustainable government procurement, and growing consumer demand for sustainable products. A.2 Sustainable Agriculture Performance Attributes • Enhance environmental quality and natural resources including local watersheds, native vegetation, habitat and forest ecosystems • Reduce and eliminate toxic substances • Reduce release of green house gases; nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide • Reduce reliance on non-renewable resources and increased use of renewable resources and energy Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 16 printed on recycled paper
  17. 17. • Diversify crops (including livestock) and cultural practices to enhance the biological and economic stability of the farm • Minimize reliance on purchased inputs; fertilizers, pesticides, irrigation water, energy, chemicals • Develop biological systems which do not need high levels of material inputs • Increase (vs. decline) soil productivity through; reduced topsoil erosion and compaction, replenishing soil organic matter, improving water holding capacity, biological activity; reducing soil salinization of soils • Reduce or eliminate non-point source of water pollutants including sediments, salts, fertilizers (nitrates and phosphorus), pesticides, and manure • Reduce eutrophication and "dead zones" due to nutrient runoff affecting many rivers, lakes, and oceans • Minimize water quality impacts on surface water, ground water, drinking water supplies, loss of wetlands, wildlife habitat and fishery production • Improve local market systems • Minimize mono-culture commodities systems • Improve rural prosperity • Increase farm profitability and competitiveness (e.g. reduced or optimized costs of inputs vs. yield losses) • Improve local economic development • Reduce depopulation of farm communities • Provide Healthy & Humane Care of Livestock. See these references: http://www.sustainableagriculture.net/vision.php - National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture http://www.thefoodalliance.org/guidingprinciples.htm - Food Alliance http://www.mtn.org/iasa/susagdef.htm - Alliance for Sustainability http://www.hsus.org/ace/11527 - Humane Society of the United States http://www.sd-commission.gov.uk/pubs/curry/01.htm - Sustainable Development Commission (UK) - see Box 1 A.3 Specific Guidance Endocrine Disruptor Background. There is much evidence of endocrine disruption of wildlife including snails, oysters, fish, alligators and other reptiles, and birds such as gulls and eagles (EPA Special Report on Environmental Endocrine Disruption, 1997). Endocrine disruption can happen at extremely low levels of exposure to the chemical, and the following chemicals should be avoided in product design (World Wildlife Fund Canada, Hormone Disruptors Resources Brief, 1998): Nonyphenol ethoxylates (NPEs), persistent organics such as dioxins, PCBs, pentachlorophenol, many pesticides, and a variety of other persistent organic chemicals, plastics, especially bisphenol A and phthalates. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission banned phthalates in toys in 1999 to prevent ingestion. The National Wildlife Federation recommends not using in product design any chemicals with a bioaccumulation factor of 250 or greater (Saving our Watersheds, 2000). Closed Loop Process Background. 40 C.F.R. § 261.4(a)(8): Secondary materials that are reclaimed and returned to the original process or processes in which they were Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 17 printed on recycled paper
  18. 18. generated where they are reused in the production process provided: (i) Only tank storage is involved, and the entire process through completion of reclamation is closed by being entirely connected with pipes or other comparable enclosed means of conveyance; (ii) Reclamation does not involve controlled flame combustion (such as occurs in boilers, industrial furnaces, or incinerators); (iii) The secondary materials are never accumulated in such tanks for over twelve months without being reclaimed; and (iv) The reclaimed material is not used to produce a fuel, or used to produce products that are used in a manner constituting disposal. Recycled Content Background. "[T]he materials that have been recovered or otherwise diverted from the solid waste stream, [can] be either during the manufacturing process (pre-consumer), or after consumer use (post consumer). To the extent the source of recycled content includes pre-consumer material, the manufacturer or advertiser must have substantiation for concluding that the pre-consumer material would otherwise have entered the solid waste stream. In asserting a recycled content claim, distinctions may be made between pre-consumer and post-consumer materials. Where such distinctions are asserted, any express or implied claim about the specific pre-consumer or post consumer content of a product or package must be substantiated (16 C.F.R. § 260.7 (e).” For products or packages that are only partially made of recycled material, a recycled claim should be adequately qualified to avoid consumer deception about the amount, by weight, of recycled content in the finished product or package. (§ 260.7 (e)." Sustainable Reuse Example. Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified lumber can be easily part of sustainable reuse. When FSC wood byproducts are composted and used as garden or agricultural soil amendments, this organic matter is “sustainably reused” by natural systems in a permanently healthy way, in contrast to unsustainable reuse of a conventional non-FSC wood, which can permanently deplete forest and habitat resources. Fostering & Accelerating the Global Market Transformation to Sustainability 18 printed on recycled paper

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