Privacy [BLOCKED]. Has technology Leaped Ahead of our Ethics?
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  • 70% of management, marketing, and HR executives see social media as a valuable recruitment tool35% of employers decided not to offer a job to a candidate based on the content uncovered on a social networking site. 60% of employees say they won’t change what they’re doing online even if their employers are watchingProvocative photos = biggest contributing factor for a hiring decision44% of employers identified references to drugs and drinking as hiring red flags.Other warning signs: bad-mouthing previous employers/colleagues and poor online communication skillshttp://mashable.com/2009/09/10/executives-social-media/http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2009/11/the_uberconnected_organization.html?cm_mmc=npv-_-MANAGEMENT_TIP-_-FEB_2010-_-MTOD0203&referral=00203http://www.benefitssellingmag.com/Exclusives/2010/1/Pages/-Employee-ethics-and-social-networking.aspxSource: Deloitte LLP 2009 Ethics & Workplace Survey http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/20/more-employers-use-social-networks-to-check-out-applicants/
  • How will social networking intersect with your broader harassment, technology and confidentiality policies? Employment policies do not work in a vacuum. Employees’ online presence—depending on what they are posting—can violate any number of other corporate policies. Drafting a social networking policy is an excellent opportunity to revisit, update and fine-tune other policies.http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808Basic questions
  • How will social networking intersect with your broader harassment, technology and confidentiality policies? Employment policies do not work in a vacuum. Employees’ online presence—depending on what they are posting—can violate any number of other corporate policies. Drafting a social networking policy is an excellent opportunity to revisit, update and fine-tune other policies.http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808Basic questions
  • How will social networking intersect with your broader harassment, technology and confidentiality policies? Employment policies do not work in a vacuum. Employees’ online presence—depending on what they are posting—can violate any number of other corporate policies. Drafting a social networking policy is an excellent opportunity to revisit, update and fine-tune other policies.http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808Basic questions
  • How will social networking intersect with your broader harassment, technology and confidentiality policies? Employment policies do not work in a vacuum. Employees’ online presence—depending on what they are posting—can violate any number of other corporate policies. Drafting a social networking policy is an excellent opportunity to revisit, update and fine-tune other policies.http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808Basic questions
  • How will social networking intersect with your broader harassment, technology and confidentiality policies? Employment policies do not work in a vacuum. Employees’ online presence—depending on what they are posting—can violate any number of other corporate policies. Drafting a social networking policy is an excellent opportunity to revisit, update and fine-tune other policies.http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808Basic questions
  • 63% of 18-34 yr olds say that employers have no business monitoring their online activity72% of companies believe their employees’ activities on social networking sites could endanger their business’s security27% of employees post content online without thinking of the ethical consequences50- 60% of companies block social networks from the office because concerned about the following:Employee productivityFear of malwareEmployees sharing confidential company informationSource: Deloitte LLP 2009 Ethics & Workplace Survey http://www.benefitssellingmag.com/Exclusives/2010/1/Pages/-Employee-ethics-and-social-networking.aspxhttp://mashable.com/2009/09/10/executives-social-media/
  • Key policy questions to address:How are employees spending their time at work?How are employees portraying the company online when they are not at work?Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all?If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it?If you permit employees to social networking at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use?http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808How far do you want to reach? Social networking presents two concerns for employers—how employees are spending their time at work, and how employees are portraying your company online when they are not at work. Any social networking policy must address both types of online use.2. Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all? It is not realistic to ban all social networking at work. For one thing, you will lose the benefit of business-related networking. Further, a blanket ban is also hard to monitor and enforce.3. If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it? Turning off Internet access, installing software to block certain sites or monitoring employees’ use and disciplining offenders are all possibilities, depending on how aggressive you want to be and how much time you want to spend watching what your employees do online.4. If you permit employees to social network at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use? How you answer this question depends on how you balance productivity versus marketing return.
  • Key policy questions to address:How are employees spending their time at work?How are employees portraying the company online when they are not at work?Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all?If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it?If you permit employees to social networking at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use?http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808How far do you want to reach? Social networking presents two concerns for employers—how employees are spending their time at work, and how employees are portraying your company online when they are not at work. Any social networking policy must address both types of online use.2. Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all? It is not realistic to ban all social networking at work. For one thing, you will lose the benefit of business-related networking. Further, a blanket ban is also hard to monitor and enforce.3. If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it? Turning off Internet access, installing software to block certain sites or monitoring employees’ use and disciplining offenders are all possibilities, depending on how aggressive you want to be and how much time you want to spend watching what your employees do online.4. If you permit employees to social network at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use? How you answer this question depends on how you balance productivity versus marketing return.
  • Key policy questions to address:How are employees spending their time at work?How are employees portraying the company online when they are not at work?Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all?If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it?If you permit employees to social networking at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use?http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808How far do you want to reach? Social networking presents two concerns for employers—how employees are spending their time at work, and how employees are portraying your company online when they are not at work. Any social networking policy must address both types of online use.2. Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all? It is not realistic to ban all social networking at work. For one thing, you will lose the benefit of business-related networking. Further, a blanket ban is also hard to monitor and enforce.3. If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it? Turning off Internet access, installing software to block certain sites or monitoring employees’ use and disciplining offenders are all possibilities, depending on how aggressive you want to be and how much time you want to spend watching what your employees do online.4. If you permit employees to social network at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use? How you answer this question depends on how you balance productivity versus marketing return.
  • Key policy questions to address:How are employees spending their time at work?How are employees portraying the company online when they are not at work?Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all?If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it?If you permit employees to social networking at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use?http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808How far do you want to reach? Social networking presents two concerns for employers—how employees are spending their time at work, and how employees are portraying your company online when they are not at work. Any social networking policy must address both types of online use.2. Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all? It is not realistic to ban all social networking at work. For one thing, you will lose the benefit of business-related networking. Further, a blanket ban is also hard to monitor and enforce.3. If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it? Turning off Internet access, installing software to block certain sites or monitoring employees’ use and disciplining offenders are all possibilities, depending on how aggressive you want to be and how much time you want to spend watching what your employees do online.4. If you permit employees to social network at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use? How you answer this question depends on how you balance productivity versus marketing return.
  • Key policy questions to address:How are employees spending their time at work?How are employees portraying the company online when they are not at work?Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all?If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it?If you permit employees to social networking at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use?http://www.thehrspecialist.com/article.aspx?articleid=27808How far do you want to reach? Social networking presents two concerns for employers—how employees are spending their time at work, and how employees are portraying your company online when they are not at work. Any social networking policy must address both types of online use.2. Do you want to permit social networking at work, at all? It is not realistic to ban all social networking at work. For one thing, you will lose the benefit of business-related networking. Further, a blanket ban is also hard to monitor and enforce.3. If you prohibit social networking, how will you monitor it? Turning off Internet access, installing software to block certain sites or monitoring employees’ use and disciplining offenders are all possibilities, depending on how aggressive you want to be and how much time you want to spend watching what your employees do online.4. If you permit employees to social network at work, do you want to limit it to work-related conduct, or permit limited personal use? How you answer this question depends on how you balance productivity versus marketing return.

Privacy [BLOCKED]. Has technology Leaped Ahead of our Ethics? Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Presentation Here 10:55 am PRIVACY[BLOCKED]Has Technology Leaped Ahead of Our Ethics
  • 2. Statistics70% of management, marketing, and HR executives see socialmedia as a valuable recruitment tool. Sources: Deloitte, LLP. 2009 Ethics & Workplace Survey; Wortham, Jenna. The New York Times, August 2009. www.ThePersimmonGroup.com
  • 3. Statistics35% of employers decided not to offer a job to a candidatebased on the content uncovered on a social networking site. www.ThePersimmonGroup.com
  • 4. Statisticsdsafdsadf60% of employees say they won’t change what they’re doingonline even if their employers are watching. www.ThePersimmonGroup.com
  • 5. Statistics People who surf the Internet for fun at work —within a reasonable limit of less than 20% of theirtotal time in the office — are more productive by about 9% than those who dont www.ThePersimmonGroup.com
  • 6. Privacy [BLOCKED]What is privacy at work?
  • 7. Privacy [BLOCKED]How do we manage ourpublic life vs private lifeat the work place?
  • 8. Privacy [BLOCKED]What is confidentiality?
  • 9. Privacy [BLOCKED]What are organizationalsecurity risks?
  • 10. Privacy [BLOCKED]How will social networkingcorrelate with yourbroader harassment,technology andconfidentiality policies?
  • 11. Statistics 72% of companies believe 27% of employees their employees’ activities on post content online social networking sites could without thinking of the endanger their business’s ethical consequences security50- 60% of companies block social 63% of 18-34 yr oldsnetworks from the office because say that employers haveconcerned about the following: – Employee productivity no business monitoring – Fear of malware their online activity – Employees sharing confidential company information Source: Deloitte, LLP. 2009 Ethics & Workplace Survey. www.ThePersimmonGroup.com
  • 12. Back at the Office… Currently, IT Data Security defines most social media policies
  • 13. Back at the Office… Allow social media but establish a company policy
  • 14. Back at the Office… Recognize it as an integral to business
  • 15. Back at the Office… Resolve with your team the compliance rules and how to balance with personal desires
  • 16. Back at the Office…
  • 17. THANK YOU! www.ThePersimmonGroup.com