Program at a glance per dayWednesday, May 1816:00 – 20:00   Registration desk open16:00 – 20:00   Poster mounting Poster a...
ProgramWednesday, May 1816:00 – 20:00   Registration   Registration desk open                desk16:00 – 20:00   Poster ar...
11:00 – 11:30 Poster area   Coffee & tea breakPARALLEL SESSION I11:30 – 13:00 Auditorium    Informed Consent, nurses and s...
11:30 – 13:00 04A04   Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) I                      Chair:            ...
11:30 – 13:00 12A05         Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case                            Discussion a...
14:00 – 15:30 01A05   Training and education of clinical ethics professionals II                      Chair:             O...
OP-033   Clinical ethics consultations family ‘moral order’ and the                      justification of French laws conc...
PS-3.3        Empirical evaluation of the training. Skills, competencies &                            institutional experi...
16:00 – 17:30 02A06   Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) II                      Chair:             ...
16:00 – 17:30 05A06     Empirical research on the quality, evaluation, processes and                        products of CE...
Friday, May 2008:00 – 17:30   Registration desk open08:00 – 09:00   Coffee & tea Poster area09:00 – 11:00   Plenary panel ...
Friday, May 2008:00 – 17:30 Registration   Registration desk open              desk08:00 – 09:00 Poster area    Coffee & t...
11:30 – 13:00 02A06   The involvement of clients and family members in CES I                      Chair:             OP-05...
11:30 – 13:00 05A06   The involvement of clients and empirical research and goals and                      justifications ...
11:30 – 13:00 06A04         Evaluation of Clinical ethics Consultation (CEC)/Moral                            Deliberation...
14:00 – 15:30 01A05   Training and education of clinical ethics professionals V                      Chair:             OP...
OP-081        Ethics Consultation and the Possibility of Psychiatric Terminal                            Illness?         ...
PARALLEL SESSION VI16:00 – 17:30 Auditorium   Training and education of clinical ethics professionals VI                  ...
16:00 – 17:30 04A04   Moral theory and moral expertise in CES II                      Chair:             OP-094   Conscien...
PP-24       Ethics committees in Belarus: ethics promoters or formal                         structures?                  ...
Saturday, May 2108:00 – 13:00   Registration desk open08:00 – 09:30   Coffee & tea Poster area09:30 – 11:00   Parallel Ses...
Saturday , May 2108:00 – 13:00   Registration   Registration desk open                desk08:00 – 09:30 Poster area      C...
09:30 – 11:00 04A04   Single Case Discussions III                      Chair:             OP-109   Responsibility and the ...
09:30 – 11:00 08A00         Difficulties, ambivalences and experiences in the practice of                            clini...
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Pp 13 johali presentation in program iccec aangepast 4

  1. 1. Program at a glance per dayWednesday, May 1816:00 – 20:00 Registration desk open16:00 – 20:00 Poster mounting Poster area17:30 – 18:30 Public Lecture Aula18:30 – 20:00 Welcome reception & Ethics market FoyerThursday, May 1908:00 – 17:30 Registration desk open08:00 – 09:00 Coffee, tea & postermounting Poster area09:00 – 09:30 Formal Opening Aula09:30 – 11:00 Plenary panel sessions on state of the art of ethics Aula K-001-00211:00 – 11:30 Coffee & tea break Poster area11:30 – 13:00 Parallel Session I Informed Consent, nurses and strikes & withdraw life support Aula OP-001-003 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals I 01A05 OP-004-005 Being a patient, management of moral deliberation & training OP-007-009 curriculum 02A06 Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) I 04A04 OP-010-012 The relationship between CES and quality of care & moral OP-013-015 competence & policy I 04A05 The Importance of Addressing Religious and Cultural Issues in PS-1 End-of-Life Clinical Decisions 08A00 Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case Discussion PS-2 about Bad Blood 12A05 Mediation Tools To Manage Identity Conflict in Clinical Ethics WS-1 Consultation BV-0H5313:00 – 14:00 Lunch & poster viewing Poster area14:00 – 15:30 Parallel Session II Empirical research on the quality, evaluation, processes and OP-019-021 products of CES I Auditorium Training and education of clinical ethics professionals II 01A05 OP-022-024 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) I 02A06 OP-025-027 Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) II 04A04 OP-028-030 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence OP-031-033 & policy II 04A05 Others and the relation between CES and quality 05A06 PP-01-09 Evaluation of Training of Health Care Professionals into Facilitators PS-3 of Moral Deliberation 08A00 Thinking like a psychologist: Useful tools from clinical psychology WS-2 for the ethics consultant BV-0H5315:30 – 16:00 Coffee & tea break Poster area16:00 – 17:30 Parallel Session III Moral theory and moral expertise in CES and the use of OP-034-036 conversation methods Auditorium Training and education of clinical ethics professionals III 01A05 OP-037-039 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) II 02A06 OP-040-042 Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) III 04A04 OP-043-045 Single Case Discussions I 04A05 OP-046-048 Empirical research on the quality, evaluation, processes and OP-049-051 products of CES II 05A06 Moving Beyond the Case: Strategies for Responding to Moral PS-4 Distress 08A00 The seven stage model of moral case deliberation: training WS-3 healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators BV- 0H53
  2. 2. ProgramWednesday, May 1816:00 – 20:00 Registration Registration desk open desk16:00 – 20:00 Poster area Poster mounting17:30 – 18:30 Aula Public Lecture Chair: Guy Widdershoven Responsibility and Authority: Multiple Perspectives on Clinical Ethics Prof.dr. Joan Tronto (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, United States of America)18:30 – 20:00 Foyer Welcome reception & Ethics marketThursday, May 1908:00 – 17:30 Registration Registration desk open desk08:00 – 09:00 Poster area Coffee, tea & poster mounting09:00 – 09:30 Aula Formal Opening Chair: Guy Widdershoven Formal Opening Prof.dr. Guy Widdershoven (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) Introduction to history of ICCEC Prof.dr. George Agich (Bowling Green State University, Ohio, United States of America) Opening music organ player: Playing Bach on a congress of Ethici? Jean van Cleef, The Netherlands09:30 – 11:00 Aula Plenary panel sessions on state of the art of ethics Chair: Guy Widdershoven K-001 Towards a naturalized clinical ethics Prof.dr. Marian Verkerk (University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands) K-002 Committees, cases, and challenges in the UK Dr. Anne Slowther (Warwick Medical School, Coventry, United Kingdom)
  3. 3. 11:00 – 11:30 Poster area Coffee & tea breakPARALLEL SESSION I11:30 – 13:00 Auditorium Informed Consent, nurses and strikes & withdraw life support Chair: OP-001 Medicine, the Media and Moving Standards of Informed Consent in Organ Donation and Transplantation Eleanor Milligan (Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia) OP-002 Caring for Patients during Strikes: a Survey of Nurses’ Dilemmas Ikeoluwa Okerin (Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospital, Ife, Nigeria) OP-003 To Apply Moderate Zero Line View to Clinical Ethics Services in Intensive Care Yen-Yuan Chen (National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan)11:30 – 13:00 01A05 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals I Chair: OP-004 A bridge over troubled waters: Linking emotions, cognitions and ethical responses in everyday clinical practice Paquita de Zuluete (Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom) OP-005 ‘Imagine you are a financially poor student…’ making Ethics relevant to your audience when strict time constraints exist Ruth Todd (Staffordshire University, Stafford, United Kingdom)11:30 – 13:00 02A06 Being a patient, management of moral deliberation & training curriculum Chair: OP-007 Moving and Re-moving Ethics. Being a Patient in the Internet- World Elena Teodora Manea (University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr. T. Popa Iasi, Exeter, United Kingdom) OP-008 How (not) to manage moral case deliberation in a health care institution? Frans Kamsteeg (GGNet, Warnsveld, The Netherlands) OP-009 Building Ethics Consultation and Consultation Training into an Innovative Medical School Curriculum Marin Gillis (Herbert Wertheim School of Medicine, Miami, United States of America)
  4. 4. 11:30 – 13:00 04A04 Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) I Chair: OP-010 Ethos of Russian Medicine and Perspectives of Clinical Ethics and Consultation Elena Grebenshchikova (Kursk State Medical University, Kursk, Russia) OP-011 Commitment in clinical ethics consultations: a benefit or a risk? Nicolas Foureur (Cochin Hospital, Paris, France) OP-012 ????? Hilbert Fleddérus (Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, The Hague, The Netherlands)11:30 – 13:00 04A05 The relationship between CES and quality of care & moral competence & policy I Chair: OP-013 Mapping the gaps in capacity decision support: moving toward clarity in the muddle Christopher Benitez (University of California, San Francisco, United States of America) OP-014 Teaching Ethical Competency to Medical Students – When to Call for a Consult Katharine Meacham (Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, United States of America) OP-015 A Role for Ethics Consultation in Enhancing Conscientious Practice in Health Care Erin O’Donnell (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, United States of America)11:30 – 13:00 08A00 The Importance of Addressing Religious and Cultural Issues in End-of-Life Clinical Decisions Chair: James Walter PS-1.1 The Importance of Addressing Religious Traditions in End-of-Life Clinical Decisions James Walter (Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, United States of America) PS-1.2 The Importance of Addressing Religious Issues in End-of-Life Clinical Decisions Robert J. Walter (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC, United States of America) PS-1.3 The Importance of Addressing Cultural Issues in End-of-Life Clinical Decisions Jennifer K. Walter (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States of America)
  5. 5. 11:30 – 13:00 12A05 Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case Discussion about Bad Blood Chair: Nicholas Kockler PS-2.1 Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case Discussion about Bad Blood Nicholas Kockler (Providence Health and Services, Portland, United States of America) PS-2.2 Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case Discussion about Bad Blood Vina Vaswani (Yenepoya University, Mangalore, India) PS-2.3 Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case Discussion about Bad Blood Anita Ho (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada) PS-2.4 Clinical Ethics across Continents and Cultures: A Case Discussion about Bad Blood …Ilkilic (History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine, Mainz, Germany)11:30 – 13:00 BV-0H53 Mediation Tools To Manage Identity Conflict in Clinical Ethics Consultation Chair: Lauren Edelstein WS-1 Mediation Tools To Manage Identify Conflict in Clinical Ethics Consultation Lauren Edelstein (Johns Hopkins Howard Country General Hospital, Columbia, United States of America)13:00 – 14:00 Poster area Lunch & poster viewingPARALLEL SESSION II14:00 – 15:30 Auditorium Empirical research on the quality, evaluation, processes and products of CES I Chair: OP-019 Ethical challenges and how to develop ethics support in community health care Lillian Lillemoen (University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway) OP-020 A method for detecting ethically challenging situations in end-of- life decision making Eva Winkler (University Hospital of the Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Munich, Germany) OP-021 The Implicit morality of child abuse detection at ER’s Jos Kole (Ethics Institute – University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)
  6. 6. 14:00 – 15:30 01A05 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals II Chair: OP-022 Impact of training on the implementation of ethics consultation services: lessons learnt from a German educational programme Andrea Dörries (Center for Health Ethics, Hannover, Germany) OP-023 From Baseline to Online: Orientation for clinical ethics consult service team members Joan Henriksen Hellyer (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, United States of America) OP-024 The Value of Logic for Clinical Ethics Constance Perry (Drexel University, Elkins Park, United States of America)14:00 – 15:30 02A06 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) I Chair: OP-025 Paediatric Clinical Ethics Service delivery in Australia Catherine Lees (The Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Australia) OP-026 Doctering With Borders: Ethics of Care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Mieke Visser (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) OP-027 Making it Work: Teamwork in Ethics Consultation Andrea Frolic (Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada)14:00 – 15:30 04A04 Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) II Chair: Marian Verkerk OP-028 Models of ethics support in institutional elderly care, a literature review Sandra van der Dam (University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands) OP-029 Moving on after a medical error. Should HECs and clinical ethicists get involved in disclosure? Linda Scheirton (Creighton University, Omaha, United States of America) OP-030 Reflections on two studies of staff’s ethical diaries in adult and in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient care Veikko Pelto-Piri (Psychiatric research center, Orebro, Sweden)14:00 – 15:30 04A05 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence & policy II Chair: John F. Tuohey OP-031 The mentally disabled person has a will – but often no voice Klaus Kobert (Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany)
  7. 7. OP-033 Clinical ethics consultations family ‘moral order’ and the justification of French laws concerning access to reproductive technologies Denis Berthiau (University Paris Descartes, Malakoff, France)14:00 – 15:30 05A06 Others and the relation between CES and quality Chair: PP-01 A Discussion on End of Life Treatment Decision Making Juan Pablo Beca (Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile) PP-02 Can children decide to participate in research? Irma Hein (De Bascule, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) PP-03 Ethical issues involved in patients requesting and clinicians making diagnoses Ananta Dave (Dudley and Walsall Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust, Sutton Coldfield, United Kingdom) PP-04 Evaluation of ethical aspect in clinical practice guidelines Radim Licenik (Palacky University Faculty of Medicine, Olomouc, Czech Republic) PP-05 Truth-telling in cancer patients in a global society Cristine Gavrilovici (University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr. T. Popa, Iasi, Romania) PP-07 Realization of autonomy principle in clinical practice in Ukraine Liudmila Paliei (National Medical Academy for Post-Graduate Education named after P.L. Shupyk, Kyiv, Ukraine) PP-08 The Ethical Debates of Inter-professional Conflicts: a Case Study in Nigeria Samuel Aliyu (Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Osogbo, Nigeria) PP-09 Ethical warrants of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of children and adolescents with ADHD Wilma Göttgens-Jansen (Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands)14:00 – 15:30 08A00 Evaluation of Training of Health Care Professionals into Facilitators of Moral Deliberation Chair: Bert Molewijk PS-3.1 Philosophical background of a training for facilitators of moral deliberation Bert Molewijk (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) PS-3.2 Aims and didactics of training facilitators moral deliberation Menno de Bree (University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands)
  8. 8. PS-3.3 Empirical evaluation of the training. Skills, competencies & institutional experience Bert Molewijk (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)14:00 – 15:30 BV-0H53 Thinking like a psychologist: Useful tools from clinical psychology for the ethics consultant Chair: WS-2 Thinking like a psychologist: Useful tools from clinical psychology for the ethics consultant Cynthia Griggins (University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, United States of America)15:30 – 16:00 Poster area Coffee & tea breakPARALLEL SESSION III16:00 – 17:30 Auditorium Moral theory and moral expertise in CES and the use of conversation methods Chair: OP-034 On the Role of the Clinical Ethicist Zuzana Deans (University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom) OP-035 A psychological model to analyze and solve moral conflicts in ethics consultation Gerald Neitzke (Hannover Medical University, Hannover, Germany) OP-036 Ethic and irony Guido Giacomo Gattai (University of Florence, Florence, Italy)16:00 – 17:30 01A05 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals III Chair: OP-037 How many history direct current ethical decision-making in clinical psychiatry: implications for ethics training and daily practice Rael Strous (Beer Yaakov Mental Health Center, Beer Yaakov, Israël) OP-038 From pseudo philosopher towards ethically competent professional? Questioning the necessity of ethical theory in professional ethics education Mariëtte van den Hoven (University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands) OP-039 Nurses’ Competencies for Participation in Ethics Committees Bart Cusveller (Christian University of Applied Sciences, Ede, The Netherlands)
  9. 9. 16:00 – 17:30 02A06 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) II Chair: OP-040 Moving CEC to New Frontiers: A Collaboration between a Social Entrepreneur and Clinical Ethics Consultant Kate Ettinger (Center for Health Professions, San Francisco, United States of America) OP-041 Moving from the Bedside into the Community: Experience of a clinical ethicist in a community Advance Care Planning Workshop Kate Ettinger (Center for Health Professions, San Francisco, United States of America) OP-042 Moving from Elder Mediation to Elder Ethics: Designing a Different Hat for CEC in the Community Setting Kate Ettinger (Center for Health Professions, San Francisco, United States of America)16:00 – 17:30 04A04 Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) III Chair: OP-043 The clinical ethics consultation (CEC): clarification tool for physicians and patients to avoid complaints? Dario Sacchini (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – Institute of Bioethics, Rome, Italy) OP-044 Where Should We Go from Here? Transformation of Ethics Services in a Culture of Excellence Nicholas Kockler (Providence Health and Services, Portland, United States of America) OP-045 Clinical ethics consultation and the concept of ownership Louise Campbell (Trinity College Dublin, Limerick, Ireland)16:00 – 17:30 04A05 Single Case Discussions I Chair: OP-046 Liver transplantation criteria, their interpretation and application: Challenges raised by the case of JT Katherine Duthie (Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, Canada) OP-047 An ethical process about information in an Alzheimer disease clinical case in a familial context Pierre Boitte (Centre d’éthique médicale, Lille, France) OP-048 Phoenix Arizona Case: Imminent Threat of Death in Pregnancy Gerard Magill (Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, United States of America)
  10. 10. 16:00 – 17:30 05A06 Empirical research on the quality, evaluation, processes and products of CES II Chair: OP-049 Moral deliberation in psychiatry. Needs and expectations of employees in a Dutch psychiatric organisation regarding moral deliberation Maarten van Woelderen (Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands) OP-050 The Use of Practical and Innovative Tools to Improve the Quality of Ethics Consultation Ellen Fox (VA National Center for Ethics in Health Care, Washington DC, United States of America) OP-051 Clinical Ethics Committees and the Language of Care Helen Kohlen (Philosophic Theological University of Vallendar, Vallendar, Germany)16:00 – 17:30 08A00 Moving Beyond the Case: Strategies for Responding to Moral Distress Chair: Lucia Wocial PS-4.1 Moving Beyond the Case: Strategies for Responding to Moral Distress Lucia Wocial (Clarian Health, Indianapolis, United States of America)16:00 – 17:30 BV-0H53 The seven stage model of moral case deliberation: training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators Chair: Menno de Bree WS-3 The seven stage model of moral case deliberation: training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators Menno de Bree (University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands)
  11. 11. Friday, May 2008:00 – 17:30 Registration desk open08:00 – 09:00 Coffee & tea Poster area09:00 – 11:00 Plenary panel session Aula K-003-00411:00 – 11:30 Coffee & tea break Poster area11:30 – 13:00 Parallel Session IV Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) IV OP-052-054 Auditorium Training and education of clinical ethics professionals IV 01A05 OP-055-056 The involvement of clients and family members in CES I 02A06 OP-058-060 Empirical research and the involvement of clients and family OP-061-063 members in CES 04A04 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence OP-064-066 & policy III 04A05 The involvement of clients and empirical research and goals and PP-10-18 justifications and training of clinical ethics professionals 05A06 Clinical Ethics Support – success or failure? An organizational PS-5 perspective 10A00 Evaluation of Clinical ethics Consultation (CES)/Moral Deliberation PS-6 (MD) 06A04 Emotions in moral case deliberation. Is there a right way of dealing WS-4 with emotions? BV-0H1913:00 – 14:00 Lunch & poster viewing Poster area14:00 – 15:30 Parallel Session V Training and education of c linical ethics professionals and the OP-067-069 image of clinical ethics Auditorium Training and education of clinical ethics professionals V 01A05 OP-070-071 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) III 02A06 OP-073-075 Public Health & Advanced Directives 04A04 OP-076-078 Single Case Discussions II 04A05 OP-079-081 Moral theory and moral expertise in CES I 05A06 OP-082-083 Moral Responsibilities and Mental Health 10A00 PS-7 Moralmap.com: website for moral reflection BV-0H19 WS-515:30 – 16:00 Coffee & tea break Poster area16:00 – 17:30 Parallel Session VI Training and education of clinical ethics professionals VI Auditorium OP-085-087 The involvement of clients and family members in CES II 01A05 OP-088-090 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) IV 02A06 OP-091-093 Moral theory and moral expertise in CES II 04A04 OP-094-096 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence OP-097-099 & policy IV 04A05 Empirical research and moral theory 05A06 PP-19-27 Competing Roles of a Clinical Ethics Consultant: Advocacy and PS-8 Value-Neutral Mediation 10A00 Moving Ethics: an experiential workshop connecting body and WS-6 mind in ethics consultation practice BV-0H1918:00 – 22:30 Conference Dinner Rosarium
  12. 12. Friday, May 2008:00 – 17:30 Registration Registration desk open desk08:00 – 09:00 Poster area Coffee & tea09:00 – 11:00 Aula Plenary panel session Chair: Bert Molewijk K-003 Certification of the field: ASBH Taskforce Prof.dr. Mark Aulisio (Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, United States of America) K-004 Clinical ethics in developing countries Prof.dr. Henk ten Have (Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, United States of America)11:00 – 11:30 Poster area Coffee & tea breakPARALLEL SESSION IV11:30 – 13:00 Auditorium Goals and justifications of clinical ethics services (CES) IV Chair: OP-052 Ethicist stat! Towards providing timely ethics consults to the Emergency Department Jacky Parker (The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada) OP-053 Evaluating Ethics Consultation Thomas May (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, United States of America) OP-054 Relevance of the Normative Function of a Clinical Ethics Committee. Elaboration of a guideline for blood transfusions in Jehovah’s Witness patients María Inés Gómez (Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile)11:30 – 13:00 01A05 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals IV Chair: OP-055 Combined use of the ‘Four Topics’ and ‘Clinical Casuistry’ methods in clinical ethics case consultation: a new approach Robert Walker (USF College of Medicine, Florida, United States of America) OP-056 Health Professional’s knowledge and perception about Informed Consent in a Cuban Hospital Dirce Guilhem (University of Brasilia College of Health Sciences, Brasilia, Brazil)
  13. 13. 11:30 – 13:00 02A06 The involvement of clients and family members in CES I Chair: OP-058 The Dilemma of the Right to Die in Cameroon Martin Anu Nkematabong (University of Yaounde, Yaounde, Cameroon) OP-059 Violation of ethical principles: confusion about what is/is not euthanasia and fear of litigation means patients are dying in extreme pain and suffering Colleen Cartwright (Southern Cross University, Tweed Heads, Australia) OP-060 Patient/Relative Participation in Ethical Consultations: a Nigerian Experience Michael Afolabi (Lautech, Osogbro, Nigeria)11:30 – 13:00 04A04 Empirical research and the involvement of clients and family members in CES Chair: OP-061 Moving by experience; aims and results in moral case deliberation Frouk Weidema (VU university medical center/GGNet, Warnsveld, the Netherlands) OP-062 Aiming at equality; Experiences with client participation in moral case deliberation Leonard van Wijk (VU university medical center/GGNet, Warnsveld, the Netherlands) OP-063 Physicians’ awareness and opinions about clinical ethics consultation: Data from Turkey Murat Civaner (Uludag University School of Medicine, Bursa, Turkey)11:30 – 13:00 04A05 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence & policy III Chair: OP-064 Clinical Ethics Consultation Moving through Concentric Circles: the perspective of organizational ethics Renzo Pegoraro (Fondazione Lanza, Padova, Italy) OP-065 Utilizing Clinical Ethics Consult Deliberations to Inform Leaders and Policy Makers in Integrated Health Systems Eric Wasylenko (Alberta Health Services, Okotoks, Canada) OP-066 Developing Practice Standards for Healthcare Ethics: The Canadian Approach Cheryl Cline (Queens University and Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Canada)
  14. 14. 11:30 – 13:00 05A06 The involvement of clients and empirical research and goals and justifications and training of clinical ethics professionals Chair: PP-10 Realization of principles and rules of bioethics in the medical legislation of Russia Irina Aseeva (South-West State University, Kursk, Russia) PP-11 Access to Health Care: Perceptions of People Living with HIV/AIDS Ravi Vaswani (Yenepoya University, Mangalore, India) PP-12 Ethics consultation: who is the target? Juan Pablo Beca (Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile) PP-13 Place of Ethics in SE Health Professions Education and Practice Eisa Johali (King Saud University Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) PP-14 ‘I have learnt to exercise silence’. Senior medical students and their ethics reports: some challenges for medical educators Phillipa Malpas (University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand) PP-15 An evaluation of bioethics learning to undergraduate medical students Lorna Luco (Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile) PP-16 The case-construction method in courses for clinical ethics Kenji Hattori (Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma, Japan) PP-17 New Approach for Teaching Bioethics to Nursing students Dorit Rubinstein (Zefat Academic College, Yehud, Israël) PP-18 What is a role of the instructor in medical ethics case study? Akiko Miyagi (Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma, Japan)11:30 – 13:00 10A00 Clinical Ethics Support – success or failure? An organizational perspective Chair: Ana Borovecki PS-5.1 The impact of the organisation on clinical ethics services Andrea Dörries (Center for Health Ethics, Hannover, Germany) PS-5.2 CEC- well-meant, but dysfunctional activities in the realm of medical ethics In the countries in transition Ana Borovecki (University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia) PS-5.3 ‘Taking Ethics Out of Isolation: A Systems Approach to Organizational Quality Improvement’ Evan DeRenzo (Washington Hospital Center, Rockville Maryland, United States of America) PS-5.4 Case study: a thematic discussion group on respect for elderly people in a French hospital Pierre Boitte (Centre d’éthique médicale, Lille, France)
  15. 15. 11:30 – 13:00 06A04 Evaluation of Clinical ethics Consultation (CEC)/Moral Deliberation (MD) Chair: Jan Schildmann PS-6.1 Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Consultation (CEC)/Moral Deliberation (MD) Jan Schildmann (Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany) PS-6.2 Normativity in the evaluation of clinical ethics consultation (CEC) & moral deliberation (MD): a critical review and plea for a theory and context sensitive approach Jan Schildmann (Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany) PS-6.3 Evaluation and normativity of CEC/MD Gerald Neitzke (Hannover Medical University, Hannover, Germany) PS-6.4 Is the discussion of patient cases in clinical ethics- committees useful for the clinicians? Reidun Førde (University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway) PS-6.5 Evaluation of moral case deliberation through responsive evaluation. Dialogue on dialogue Bert Molewijk (VU university medical center/GGNet, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)11:30 – 13:00 BV-0H19 Emotions in moral case deliberation. Is there a right way of dealing with emotions? Chair: Dick Kleinlugtenbelt WS-4 Emotions in moral case deliberation Dick Kleinlugtenbelt (GGNet, Warnsveld, the Netherlands)13:00 – 14:00 Poster area Lunch & poster viewingPARALLEL SESSION V14:00 – 15:30 Auditorium Training and education of clinical ethics professionals and the image of clinical ethics Chair: OP-067 Advance Care Planning: benefits and challenges of implementation at a health care facility Elizabeth Clark (JJ Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, United States of America) OP-068 Training Ethics Committee Members as a Necessary Step Naama Wietchner (International Center for Health Law and Ethics, Zur Yigal, Israël) OP-069 Who’s Afraid of Ethics Consultations? Kurt Schmidt (Center for Medical Ethics, Frankfurt, Germany)
  16. 16. 14:00 – 15:30 01A05 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals V Chair: OP-070 A Comparison of Methods of Training Robert Orr (Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, United States of America) OP-071 Informational Deficits in Clinical Ethics Consultation: When clinicians (unintentionally) manipulate facts to achieve a preferred outcome Daryl Pullman (Memorial University, St. John’s Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada)14:00 – 15:30 02A06 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) III Chair: OP-073 Moving Clinical Ethics Consultation Services into the Future: Becoming Proactive; a Necessary Paradigm Shift Thomas Foreman (The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada) OP-074 Moving Ethics into the Community Mary Caldwell (Mission Hospital, Asheville, United States of America) OP-075 Good policymaking in clinical ethics: from a sense of urgency to institutional change in the case of artificial nutrition and hydration Jürgen Wallner (Hospital of St. John of God, Vienna, Austria)14:00 – 15:30 04A04 Public Health & Advanced Directives Chair: OP-076 Clinical Ethics Consultation as a Model for Public Health Ethics Consultation Jaro Kotalik (Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada) OP-077 Missing the Mark? Advance Health Directive’s (AHD) in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Australia Eleanor Milligan (Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia) OP-078 Ethics of Embryo Research: A Muslim Perspectives Ahmed Ragab (Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt)14:00 – 15:30 04A05 Single Case Discussions II Chair: OP-079 Are We Doing the Right Thing? Dealing with Moral Distress in the Clinical Setting Kurt Smidt-Jernstrom (Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center, Clackamas, United States of America) OP-080 The Ethical Challenge of Smoking in Hospitals: A Moving Tale Eleanor Milligan (Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia)
  17. 17. OP-081 Ethics Consultation and the Possibility of Psychiatric Terminal Illness? Mark Aulisio (Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, United States of America)14:00 – 15:30 05A06 Moral theory and moral expertise in CES I Chair: OP-082 To Account for or To Disregard Social Vulnerability when Allocating Resources K.G. Gervais (Minnesota Center for Health Care Ethics, St. Paul, United States of America) OP-083 Moral Courage: Necessary Skill for Moral Expertise Vicki Lachman (Drexel University, Philadelphia, United States of America)14:00 – 15:30 10A00 Moral Responsibilities and Mental Health Chair: Elleke Landeweer PS-7.1 Explaining why mental disorders can influence moral responsibility Gerben Meynen (GGZ Ingeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) PS-7.2 Seclusion and responsibility: dilemmas and limitations in reducing seclusion Cecile Gijsbers van Wijk (GGZ Ingeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) PS-7.3 Moral Responsibilities and Mental Health Elleke Landeweer (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) PS-7.4 Moving health care professionals in moral case deliberation: a dialogue about responsibility Margreet Stolper (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)14:00 – 15:30 BV-0H19 Moralmap.com: website for moral reflection Chair: Myra van Zwieten WS-5 Moralmap.com: website for moral reflection Myra van Zwieten (Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)15:30 – 16:00 Poster area Coffee & tea break
  18. 18. PARALLEL SESSION VI16:00 – 17:30 Auditorium Training and education of clinical ethics professionals VI Chair: OP-085 Accrediting Training Programs and Developing a Code of Ethics for Clinical Ethics Consultants: Recent ASBH Initiatives Robert Baker (Union Graduate College, Schenectady, United States of America) OP-086 Revisiting Non-physician Consultations: the Need for Ethical Education Michael Afolabi (Lautech, Osogbo, Nigeria) OP-087 Bioethics and Nursing: Theory and Clinical Practice Dirce Guilhem (University of Brasilia College of Health Sciences, Brasilia, Brazil)16:00 – 17:30 01A05 The involvement of clients and family members in CES II Chair: OP-088 Involvement of parents in Clinical Ethics Committees in end-of- life decisions regarding children Marianne Bahus (Section for Medical Ethics, Oslo, Norway) OP-089 An impartial perspective – the interaction between family members and a clinical ethicist Dorothea Touwen (Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands) OP-090 Ethical challenges in Norwegian nursing homes. The experience of patients and next of kin Elisabeth Gjerberg (Center of Medical Ethics, Oslo, Norway)16:00 – 17:30 02A06 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) IV Chair: OP-091 Who is the clinical ethicist? – and how does that affect the implementation of ethical support services? Rouven Christian Porz (University Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland) OP-092 Moving from the Bedside into the Clinic: Preventative Ethics Education in an Outpatient Clinic Kate Ettinger (Center for Health Professions, San Francisco, United States of America) OP-093 Setting up a students’ clinical ethics committee Carolyn Johnston (King’s College London School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom)
  19. 19. 16:00 – 17:30 04A04 Moral theory and moral expertise in CES II Chair: OP-094 Conscientious objections to end-of-life procedures: a neglected topic in clinical ethics services research Chris Gastmans (Catholic University Leuven, Leuven, Belgium) OP-095 Different types of expertise in clinical ethics consultation – lessons to learn from the debate on empirical medical ethics Sabine Salloch (Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany) OP-096 Autothanatography: An Ethical Approach to Dying Annette Allen (University of Louisville, Louisville, United States of America)16:00 – 17:30 04A05 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence & policy IV Chair: OP-097 Moral Distress & The Health Care Professional Thompson Faller (University of Portland, Portland, United States of America) OP-098 Moving reproductive ethics: From the laboratory and the clinic to the organization of maternity care Raymond de Vries (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States of America) OP-099 Autonomy, Dignity and Discharge of the Elderly Patient Lynn Maitland (Trinity Health, Novi, United States of America)16:00 – 17:30 05A06 Empirical research and moral theory Chair: PP-19 Patient’s will and doctors’ competence: Reasoning in clinical ethics consultation (CEC) Margarete Pfaefflin (Epilepsy-Center Bethel, Bielefeld, Germany) PP-20 Taking care of elderly patients in intensive care units: a gradual elaboration of a clinical ethics grid as an experimental co- construction among professionals and researches in ethics Jean-Philippe Cobbaut (Catholic University of Lille, Lille, France) PP-21 Early Indicators of Ethical Issues: Strengthening Nurses’ Voices Katherine Brown-Saltzman (UCLA Healthcare System, Los Angeles, United States of America) PP-22 Moral Distress Thermometer a New Screening Tool for Moral Distress Lucia Wocial (Clarian Health, Indianapolis, United States of America) PP-23 The Ethics Tower of Babel: a need for common language in the documentation and practice of clinical ethics services Mike Kekewich (The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada)
  20. 20. PP-24 Ethics committees in Belarus: ethics promoters or formal structures? Andrei Famenka (State Service of Forensic Medicine of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus) PP-25 Ethics in practice Pernilla Pergert (Karolinska Unversity Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden) PP-26 Clinical Ethics Support for end-of-life decisions in intensive care – Coming of age of an innovative model Barbara Meyer-Zehnder (University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland) PP-27 ‘Thick ethical concepts’ in child abuse detection at ERs Jos Kole (University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)16:00 – 17:30 10A00 Competing Roles of a Clinical Ethics Consultant: Advocacy and Value-Neutral Mediation Chair: Dien Ho PS-8.1 Competing Roles of a Clinical Ethics Consultant: Advocacy and Value-Neutral Mediation Dien Ho (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, United States of America) PS-8.2 Value-Neutrality in Clinical Ethics Consultation Dien Ho (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, United States of America) PS-8.3 Advocacy in Ethics Consultation with Vulnerable Patients: Case Study Involving a Ward of the State Maureen Kelley (University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, United States of America) PS-8.4 Is Advocacy Only for Patients? A Case Study Susan Miller (Methodist Academic Medicine Associates, Houston, United States of America) PS-8.5 Approaching Advocacy in Clinical Ethics Consultation with Caution Lisa Rasmussen (University of North Carolina, Charlotte, United States of America)16:00 – 17:30 BV-0H19 Moving Ethics: an experiential workshop connecting body and mind in ethics consultation practice Chair: Andrea Frolic WS-6 Moving Ethics: an experiential workshop connecting body and mind in ethics consultation practice Victoria Slager (Victoria Slager Choreography, Ancaster, Canada)18:00 – 22:30 Rosarium Conference Dinner
  21. 21. Saturday, May 2108:00 – 13:00 Registration desk open08:00 – 09:30 Coffee & tea Poster area09:30 – 11:00 Parallel Session VII Moral theory and moral expertise in CES III Auditorium OP-100-102 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals VII 01A05 OP-103-104 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) V 02A06 OP-106-108 Single Case Discussions III 04A04 OP-109-111 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence OP-112-114 & policy V 04A05 Cheap and Fair and use of restraint 12A05 OP-115-117 Difficulties, ambivalences and experiences in the practice of PS-9 clinical ethics consultation 08A00 Training health care professionals as facilitators of moral case WS-7 deliberation: learning by doing BV-0H1911:00 – 11:30 Coffee & tea break Poster area11:30 – 12:45 Plenary closing session: debate on ethics in practice with Stakeholders Aula12:45 – 13:00 Closing remarks Aula13:00 – 14:00 Poster dismantling Poster area
  22. 22. Saturday , May 2108:00 – 13:00 Registration Registration desk open desk08:00 – 09:30 Poster area Coffee & teaPARALLEL SESSION VII09:30 – 11:00 Auditorium Moral theory and moral expertise in CES III Chair: OP-100 Narrative and hermeneutical approaches to clinical ethics support services Rouven Christian Porz (University Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland) OP-101 Macro ethics and moral deliberation on the ward. Development of a normative framework for reproductive centres in the Netherlands. Norbert Steinkamp (Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands) OP-102 Ethics is Moving – As Long as Being Lost Isn’t So Bad Melinda Ann McGarrah Sharp (Phillips Theological Seminary, Tulsa, United States of America)09:30 – 11:00 01A05 Training and education of clinical ethics professionals VII Chair: OP-103 An Innovative and Interactive Bioethics Consultation Curriculum from the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Bioethics Hannah Lipman (Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, United States of America) OP-104 Consent in Medical Practice: Gap between Theory and Practice Vina Vaswani (Yenepoya University, Mangalore, India)09:30 – 11:00 02A06 Formats and structures of clinical ethics services (CES) V Chair: OP-106 Building and sustaining a clinical ethics service (CES): challenges and successes Marie-Eve Bouthillier (CSSSS de Laval, Laval, Canada) OP-107 Challenges and Accomplishments in Delivery of Clinical Ethics Service: Perspective from the North-western Ontario Julija Kelecevic (Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada) OP-108 Medical Ethics Committees in Patients’ Rights Act: Ethics, Law and Reality Naama Wietchner (International Center for Health Law and Ethics, Zur Yigal, Israël)
  23. 23. 09:30 – 11:00 04A04 Single Case Discussions III Chair: OP-109 Responsibility and the Urge to Follow-Up: An Example of Moral Complexity in Clinical Ethics Practice Stuart Finder (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, United States of America) OP-110 The Utrecht Method – an ethical case deliberation model Carla Kessler (Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands) OP-111 Never again: One patient’s experience in completing a psychiatric advance directive Cynthia Griggins (University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, United States of America)09:30 – 11:00 04A05 The relation between CES and quality of care & moral competence & policy V Chair: OP-112 An Ethics Strategic Plan (saves us from going madly off in all directions) Rick Singleton (Eastern Health, St. John’s Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada) OP-113 Preserving Human Dignity during Treatment of Handcuffed Prisoners Dorit Rubinstein (Michal Peiser Zefat Academic College, Yehud, Israel) OP-114 Case Features and Systemic Pressures Impacting Incapacitated Patients Alone at a Safety Net Hospital Eric Isaacs (University of California, San Francisco, United States of America)09:30 – 11:00 12A05 Cheap and Fair and use of restraint Chair: OP-115 Is it possible to make cheap services fair? Allerdiena Hubbeling (South-West London and St. George’s NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom) OP-116 End of Life Issues and the Brazilian Medicine Leo Pessini (Saint Camillus University, Sao Paulo, Brazil) OP-117 Soft restraint or hard alternative? The ethics of technological alternatives to restraints in residential care for people with dementia or intellectual disabilities: a research project Brenda Frederiks (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  24. 24. 09:30 – 11:00 08A00 Difficulties, ambivalences and experiences in the practice of clinical ethics consultation Chair: Eva Winkler PS-9.1 Pitfalls in clinical ethics consultation (CEC): conflicts of duty and interest Margarete Pfaefflin (Epilepsy-Center Bethel, Bielefeld, Germany) PS-9.2 Success factors and problems in getting an ethics consultation up and running Eva Winkler (University Hospital of the Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Munich, Germany) PS-9.3 Living with the result of an ethics consultation – the Ethics consultant’s influence on outcome and process Stella Reiter-Theil (Medical Faculty, Basel, Switzerland)09:30 – 11:00 BV-0H19 Training health care professionals as facilitators of moral case deliberation: learning by doing Chair: Margreeth Stolper WS-7 Training health care professionals as facilitators of moral case deliberation: learning by doing Margreet Stolper (VU university medical center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)11:00 – 11:30 Poster area Coffee & tea break11:30 – 12:45 Aula Plenary closing session: debate on ethics in practice with Stakeholders Chair: Bert Molewijk What American ethics consultants are talking about...and NOT talking about Cynthia Griggins (University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, United States of America) Ideas regarding future needs of clinical ethics support Ana Borovečkim (University of Zagreb, School of Medicine “Andrija Štampar” School of Public Health, Zagreb, Croatia) Evaluation of clinical ethics support services: normative and empirical challenges Jan Schildmann (Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany) Capacity Building in Clinical Ethics Consultation Karim Syahirah (Research Assiociate Center for Biomedical Ethics National University of Singapore, Singapore, Republic of Singapore)12:45 – 13:00 Aula Closing remarks13:00 – 14:00 Poster area Poster dismantling

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